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Learn how to prevent typical volleyball injuries. #SeeAPT1st: Learn how to prevent typical Volleyball injuries. #SeeAPT1st Click Here for the Article http://dlvr.it/QgCLN7
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Course of exercise yields similar results as surgery for knee injury: Physical therapy may be utilized either instead of or after surgery The meniscus is a crescent-shaped piece of cartilage between the thighbone (femur) and the shinbone (tibia), and its job is to stabilize the knee and absorb shock. Damage to the meniscus, which is called a meniscal lesion, can occur from an injury or due to gradual changes over time, which come with age. Patients with meniscal lesions who have knee pain and difficulty performing daily activities may be given different treatment recommendations depending on what type of doctor they see. Some patients are told to follow a wait-and-see policy, in which they rest for a period of time and see if their condition improves. Physical therapy may be utilized during this time. For patients with extreme pain and for those that do not improve, surgery may be recommended instead to repair the damage in the knee. In many cases, patients are referred to a course of physical therapy after surgery to help them rehabilitate. Treatment typically consists of a series of exercises to reduce pain and inflammation and help restore their normal range of motion. Although this is an approach that's commonly recommended, it is not clear how effective exercise therapy is for these patients. Therefore, a powerful pair of studies called a systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted. The systematic review gathered all relevant research on exercise therapy and surgery for meniscal lesions, and the meta-analysis reviewed these all in detail to determine which approach is best for patients. Nine medical databases searched for appropriate studies To collect data for the review, researchers searched through nine major medical databases for studies on exercise therapy and surgery for meniscal lesions. Only randomized-controlled trials and controlled clinical trials—two types of powerful studies—that fit a set of criteria were accepted. This led to a total of 12 studies with data on 594 patients being accepted for the systematic review and meta-analysis. All studies were then analyzed and assessed for strength of evidence and risk of bias. Exercise therapy found to have certain advantages over surgery Overall, exercise therapy and surgery were found to lead to similar outcomes in knee pain, function, and performance for patients with meniscal lesions. Exercise therapy, however, was more effective for improving muscle strength than surgery after a short period of time. In addition, exercise therapy was found to be more effective than no treatment at all for muscle strength and performance in the short term. In the long term after surgery, exercise therapy was also more effective than no treatment on patients' ability to function normally. Taken together, this suggests that patients who have surgery for meniscal lesions can benefit from exercise therapy after the procedure is performed. More research is needed to investigate this topic in greater detail, but it appears that exercise therapy can be considered an alternative option to surgery for treating meniscal lesions, and it may lead to similar overall results. -As reported in the April '16 issue of the Journal of Science in Medicine in Sport http://dlvr.it/Qg5B7d
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ACL surgery patients similar outcomes as ones treated non-operatively: Patients' expectations are not often met after surgery Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are one of the most common injuries in athletes. These injuries are seen in a variety of sports, but athletes who participate in sports that involve lots of cutting movements-like basketball, soccer and football-are at a particularly high risk. Once an ACL tear occurs, the patient is usually presented with two options: treating it surgically with a procedure called an ACL reconstruction, or non-surgically through extensive physical therapy and rehabilitation. Many patients-especially athletes-decide to have an ACL reconstruction and go into the procedure with expectations that they will be able to return to their prior level of activity and avoid further injury. Unfortunately, these goals are not often met after surgery. In one study, only 65% of patients returned to their pre-injury level of sport, while 36% developed knee osteoarthritis within 10 years of surgery. But despite this information, many patients continue to have ACL surgery with lofty expectations that may not be met. To investigate this matter in more detail and better inform patients, a study was conducted to evaluate the differences in overall outcomes over five years in patients treated surgically or non-surgically for an ACL tear. Majority of patients decide to have surgery A total of 105 athletes between ages 14-55 years old, all of whom were involved in cutting and pivoting sports, were enrolled in this five-year study. These participants discussed whether they should have surgery or not with their surgeon and physical therapist, and 83 decided to have ACL reconstruction. The other 22 decided to have non-surgical treatment, which consisted of a physical therapy and rehabilitation program. After the program, patients in this group were instructed to follow a set of home exercises that focused on improving strength and muscular control, as well as helping them return to their former level of sports participation. Surgery was also followed up with a rehabilitation program that focused on bringing these patients back to their respective sport. All patients were assessed before the intervention began and then again five years later for a number of variables, including strength of the quadriceps muscles in the front of the thigh, a single-legged hop test and other patient-reported outcomes. Positive outcomes occur in both groups Five years after treatment, patients in both groups experienced positive outcomes, and the results between the two groups were found to be very similar. In particular, scores from the quadriceps strength and single-legged hop test were high and did not differ between the surgical and non-surgical groups. The same was true for the frequency of cutting and pivoting activities and the participation in pre-injury levels of these activities. Regarding overall activity levels, 61% of patients treated surgically and 50% of those treated non-surgically were able to engage in their pre-injury level of activity at five years. Patients in the non-surgical group reported scores that were slightly lower than the surgical group on quality of life, but scores were not different between groups in measures of knee symptoms or function. Finally, only 5% of patients treated non-surgically developed knee osteoarthritis by this time point, compared to 23% of patients treated surgically. Taken together, these results suggest that ACL reconstruction is not mandatory for all individuals who tear their ACL, and that positive outcomes are still very possible with non-surgical treatment, too. Therefore, if you recently tore your ACL and are currently trying to make a decision on whether or not to have surgery, keep this study in mind and have a thorough discussion with your surgeon and physical therapist. Every case is different, but it is possible that physical therapy alone may be sufficient for your condition and could help you achieve similar results to surgery without the associated risks, at a far lower cost. -As reported in the June '18 issue of The American Journal of Sports Medicine http://dlvr.it/QfrhLT
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Education program explaining pain is beneficial for patient outcomes: Patients generally want to learn more about their pain Pain is necessary for our survival and something that we all experience to a certain degree from time to time. But dealing with pain on a regular or constant basis is not normal and requires appropriate treatment to address it. In addition to treating what's called musculoskeletal pain—a term used to describe any pain that affects the bones, muscles or other connecting structures—education is another tool that may be helpful for improving the outcomes of patients. Studies have shown that people in pain are generally interested in learning more about what is causing their pain, and providing them with this education may reduce their pain and stress levels. There are several different types of educational strategies that focus on various systems of the body, but neuroscience education is believed to be most effective for patients dealing with continual pain. Pain neuroscience education (PNE) aims to explain the many processes at work involving the nervous system that causes pain, with the goal of making patients more aware of how to overcome it. In order to more develop a better understanding of the effectiveness of PNE, a powerful study called a systematic review was conducted. This type of study gathers all the most important literature on the topic and evaluates it in order to establish a conclusion. 13 high-quality studies accepted for review Investigators searched through 11 major medical databases for studies that assessed the use of PNE for various musculoskeletal conditions. This search led to a total of 13 studies called randomized-controlled trials being accepted for the review. Randomized-controlled trials place participants in separate groups to receive different interventions, are they considered the highest-quality individual studies available. Each of these studies was evaluated in detail and then assessed for quality, which helps to establish how reliable its information is. PNE reduces patients' pain and improves their attitudes and behaviors Results from the systematic review showed that PNE did, in fact, lead to several benefits for patients with musculoskeletal pain. In particular, it reduced patients' disability and usage of healthcare and improved their pain ratings, knowledge of pain, as well as their attitudes and beliefs regarding pain. In addition, it was found that when PNE was combined with a physical intervention led by a physical therapist, patients experienced even better outcomes than when following the PNE alone. Finally, all the studies reviewed were rated as having good quality, which shows that their information was reliable. These findings show that PNE is effective for patients dealing with musculoskeletal pain since it can improve their attitudes and beliefs, and actually reduce their disability levels. More research is needed to explore the benefits of PNE further, but this type of education should be viewed as a helpful method for managing these patients. -As reported in the July ‘16 issue of Physiotherapy Theory and Practice http://dlvr.it/QffBQ9
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Recipe Wednesday - Parmesan Rice and Pasta Pilaf: Looking for a good side dish? Click here for this unique recipe! http://dlvr.it/QfCbWj
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Thigh muscle exercises are beneficial for knee condition patients: Updated review of studies needed Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is one of the most commonly reported injuries in the field of sports medicine. The condition is most prevalent in runners and active individuals, and individuals who have it experience pain behind and around the kneecap that tends to get worse with squatting, prolonged sitting and stair activities. Treatment for PFPS typically consists of physical therapy, with a focus on exercises that strengthen the quadriceps muscles in the front of the thigh. This type of intervention is popularly used, but evidence to support its effectiveness is not very strong. The last review of studies on the topic was in 2003, and it only found little evidence that these exercises were effective for PFPS. For this reason, an updated review of the available literature-which is called a systematic review-was conducted, with the aim of determining the true effectiveness of quadriceps-strengthening exercises for PFPS patients. Researchers perform a search of three databases for appropriate studies To conduct the review, researchers performed a search of three major medical databases. They were specifically looking for high-quality studies called randomized-controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated the effects of quadriceps-strengthening exercises for PFPS. RCTs randomly assign patients to various treatment groups and are considered the gold standard for determining whether an intervention works or not. This search led to seven RCTs being included: three RCTs on 204 participants investigated quadriceps-strengthening exercises alone, while five RCTs on 422 participants investigated quadriceps-strengthening exercises combined with other interventions. Once gathered, the researchers reviewed the findings of these RCTs and compared them to one another. The quality of all included studies was also assessed in order to gauge how reliable their results were. Quadriceps-strengthening exercises alone and in combination reduce pain and improve function On the whole, results were supportive of quadriceps-strengthening exercises for PFPS patients, both alone and when combined with other exercises. It was found that when they were performed alone, these exercises were more effective for reducing pain and improving function in patients when compared with advice and information alone. When combined with other interventions-such as hip-strengthening exercises, stretching, kneecap taping and home exercises-these exercises were also found to reduce pain for up to 12 months; however, they did not appear to improve function. This lack of improvement may be due to patients self-reporting their function scores, which has a margin for error. Nonetheless, the findings of this systematic review clearly show that quadriceps-strengthening exercises are beneficial to individuals with PFPS, whether used on their own or combined with other interventions. Based on this, patients currently dealing with pain that could be PFPS should think about seeing a physical therapist to receive an appropriate treatment program with these components to help them improve quickly and safely. -As reported in the June '14 issue of JOSPT http://dlvr.it/Qf5NDY
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Motivational Monday: -C.S. Lewis http://dlvr.it/QdzCVb
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Inline skating is great exercise, learn ways to stay safe. #SeeAPT1st: Inline skating is a great aerobic exercise, learn practical ways to stay safe. #SeeAPT1st Click Here for the Article http://dlvr.it/QdjRPC
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Pitching consecutive days in youth softball leads to pain & weakness: Popularity of softball is growing rapidly in the U.S. Fast-pitch softball is one of the most popular and fastest growing sports among youth females, and the number of high school softball players in the U.S. is nearing that of baseball. But there is one major difference between the two sports: the mechanics of pitching a baseball and the impact it has on the body have been thoroughly studied, but research on the mechanics of the windmill pitch in softball is lacking. While it was once believed that the stress placed on the shoulder in softball is less than in baseball, recent studies have suggested that it may be more similar. The number of injuries in fast-pitch softball is also very high, but the details surrounding these injuries are poorly documented. But despite all these signs that the windmill pitching motion in softball is not as safe as previously thought, there are no pitching limitations in fast-pitch softball as there are in baseball. This means that some softball pitchers can pitch multiple games in a single day, up to three days in a row in some cases. Since research is lacking on the impact of pitching so frequently on these young pitchers' arms, a study was conducted that investigated this effect on strength, fatigue and pain related to windmill pitching in youth softball. Data collected on youth pitchers participating in 2-day and 3-day tournaments For the study, researchers collected data on 17 female fast-pitch softball pitchers between the ages of 14-18 years who were participating in 2-day and 3-day weekend tournaments. Before pitching, information was gathered on these participants' demographics and their history of shoulder injury or pain, as well as any other medical problems that might have had an effect on their ability to pitch. Then, at the start and end of each day of tournament play, these pitchers were assessed for fatigue, pain and strength of the shoulder and elbow in the dominant throwing arm. These values were compared at the end of each day and at the end of the tournament to determine if pitching had a negative effect on their symptoms. Pain and fatigue are found to gradually increase over the course of the tournament Of the 17 pitchers studied, eight participated in 3-day tournaments and six participated in 2-day tournaments. These athletes pitched in 1.5 games per day and threw 82 pitches per day, and there was a total exposure of three games pitched and 166 pitches thrown per tournament. Results showed that over the course of an average single day of tournament play, these pitchers had a significant increase in shoulder pain and fatigue, as well as a decrease in their strength. Over the course of the entire tournament, there was an even greater increase in pain and fatigue, as well as a greater decrease in their strength over this period of time. Finally, it was found that these pitchers did not recover to their baseline strength in many of the tested muscle groups by the day following pitching. How pitch counts and physical therapy can help These findings clearly show that windmill pitching on consecutive days leads to declines in shoulder and elbow strength that are not recovered the next day, as well as significant increases in pain and fatigue. These changes can lead to shoulder damage and increase the risk for injury in young softball players if they continue to pitch on consecutive days without regulations. This is why it has been suggested that implementing pitch counts similar to those used in baseball may address this potential problem and reduce the likelihood of injury in softball. Another possible solution to go along with pitch counts is to better prepare these young athletes for the demands of their sport with a conditioning training program provided by a physical therapist. Doing so can increase overall fitness levels and build up strength in these players so that their bodies are more capable of handling the impact of pitching regularly over the course of a softball season. -As reported in the May '17 issue of The American Journal of Sports Medicine http://dlvr.it/QdMJhf
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Motivational Monday: -Margaret Mead http://dlvr.it/QdFJ56
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