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Richard E. Cytowic
Works at Author, Neuroscientist, Lecturer
Attended Duke University, University of London, Wake Forest University of School of Medicine, George Washington University, American University
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Author and Neurologist
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Explaining complex issues of mind, brain, & society in clear terms
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  • Author, Neuroscientist, Lecturer
    present
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Twitter: @Cytowic
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Washington, DC
Story
Tagline
Writer, Talker, Sometimes Thinker. Plucked synesthesia from oblivion.
Introduction
Richard E. Cytowic, MD, MFA is best known for rediscovering synesthesia in 1980 and returning it to the scientific mainstream.
He also writes literary non-fiction and fiction.

Bragging rights
"Wednesday is Indigo Blue" won the 2011 Eric Hoffer Book Award's Montaigne Medal.
Education
  • Duke University, University of London, Wake Forest University of School of Medicine, George Washington University, American University

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Richard E. Cytowic

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An amusing kind of synesthesia in the news.
The BBC and Smithsonian Magazine reported on James Wannerton, a London pub owner who literally tastes words whenever he hears them, reads them, or even thinks them. Wannerton has a neurological trait called synesthesia (“joined sensation”), a word that rhymes with anesthesia (“no sensation”).All of our brains have cross–talk among the senses. Synesthetes just have more of it. For example, we routinely lip–read without giving it a thought, making ...
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I don't get this at all. Is there software to download, or all web based? The tutorials are useless--none of the "categories," organizers," or other options mentioned are anywhere to be found.
    Every page link from their tutorials directs me back to http://feedly.com/#discover.    HELP!
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You can use feedly on a browser and all mobile platforms. Have a look at this. 
http://feedly.com/apps.html
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Richard E. Cytowic

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After leading IBM for six decades Thomas Watson Jr. was asked what lessons he had learned from making bad decisions. “Good judgment,” he said, “comes from experience. And experience comes from bad judgment.” His adage illustrates that error is a powerful…
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Richard E. Cytowic

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Helicopter parents prevent children from coping with setbacks and disappointment.  People in their 20s do not consider themselves adults.
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Richard E. Cytowic

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Well-meaning parents try to shield their kids from unpleasant facts, assuming that tough details of reality will upset their children and inflict harm. But evidence to the contrary shows how mistaken they are.
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Richard E. Cytowic

Classroom Resources  - 
 
Two thirds of the population believes a myth that has been propagated for over a century: that we use only 10% of our brains. Hardly! Our neuron-dense brains have evolved to use the least amount of energy while carrying the most information possible -- a feat that requires the entire brain. Richard E. Cytowic debunks this neurological myth (and explains why we aren’t so good at multitasking).
http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-percentage-of-your-brain-do-you-use-richard-e-cytowic
Two thirds of the population believes a myth that has been propagated for over a century: that we use only 10% of our brains. Hardly! Our neuron-dense brains have evolved to use the least amount of energy while carrying the most information possible -- a feat that requires the entire brain. Richard E. Cytowic debunks this neurological myth (and explains why we aren’t so good at multitasking).
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In their circles
437 people
Have them in circles
233 people
David Greer's profile photo
Mind Agilis's profile photo
Teodora Petkova's profile photo
David Mixner's profile photo
Cristean Afroz's profile photo
Irene Ziegler's profile photo
VSI BATAM's profile photo
Jeff Wills's profile photo
Micheal Romeo's profile photo

Richard E. Cytowic

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How about the myth that we only use 10% of it? http://youtu.be/5NubJ2ThK_U A TED-Ed lesson, "What Percentage of your Brain do you Use?
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Richard E. Cytowic

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There are 1 million bytes in a Megabyte, not 1 thousand.  But I don't view the brain as a digital computer, so maybe the analogy is already strained.
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Richard E. Cytowic

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For a long time we’ve known that we’re far more sensitive to negative feelings than to pleasant ones. In gambling language the rule of deterrence might be stated as, “The fear of losing outweighs the pleasure of gains.” The pain of loss is quantitatively…
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When you throw a party, you don’t clean up until everyone’s gone home. Sleep is a VERY active state, not passive at all.The brain parties every moment you are awake. While it’s being lively it makes a mess, like partiers everywhere. A good night’s sleep…
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My latest TED-Ed lesson: a tale about energy efficiency, and why multitasking is a fool's errand.
Two thirds of the population believes a myth that has been propagated for over a century: that we use only 10% of our brains. Hardly! Our neuron-dense brains have evolved to use the least amount of energy while carrying the most information possible -- a feat that requires the entire brain. Richard E. Cytowic debunks this neurological myth (and explains why we aren’t so good at multitasking).
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Thanks for the low down on this oh-so-annoying misconception.
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Richard E. Cytowic's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
“Baby Brain” and Addled Mothers–To–Be
www.psychologytoday.com

Maternal hormones wreak havoc on cognition and road accidents

Sleep: The Clean-Up Crew of a Dirty Mind
www.psychologytoday.com

A good night's sleep literally clears your head

Can Fish Oil Help Preserve Brain Cells?
www.psychologytoday.com

By fillet or capsule, omega-3s really do help the brain

A TED-Ed Lesson on Synesthesia
www.psychologytoday.com

An animated lesson from TED talks about grapheme synesthesia in stop motion.

Donuts Trump Healthy Desires, Hands Down
www.psychologytoday.com

We want one thing yet often act against self-interests.

Hand Movements Give Your Poker Game Away
www.psychologytoday.com

The hands, not your face, give your intentions away.

The Maddening Normality of Autistic Brains
www.psychologytoday.com

Brain scans of autistic kids are frustratingly normal despite profound deficits.

It Takes Emotion, Not Facts, to Change a Habit
www.psychologytoday.com

A jolt of feeling beats out reason as a prod to personal change.

Richard E. Cytowic
www.goodreads.com

Author of The Man Who Tasted Shapes, Wednesday Is Indigo Blue, Synesthesia, Neurological Side of Neuropsychology, Nerve Block For Common Pai

Do Things Make You Happy, or Does Your Disposition?
www.psychologytoday.com

The admiration of others makes us want the things that we do.

No is a Complete Sentence! | Psychology Today
www.psychologytoday.com

Declining obligations imposed by others By Richard E. Cytowic, M.D....

Time Travel: The Trip of a Lifetime | Psychology Today
www.psychologytoday.com

Buckle in, your mind's going forward and backward in time. By Richard E. Cytowic, M.D....