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Fender Minerals
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Feel the Magic, Discover the Wonder of Gemstones
Feel the Magic, Discover the Wonder of Gemstones

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"No one is useless in this world who lightens the burdens of another." - Charles Dickens
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9/24/17
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"Success isn't permanent, and failure isn't fatal." Mike Ditka
Agate Stalactite Polished Solar Quartz
http://etsy.me/2fyprY2 via @Etsy

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"Success isn't permanent, and failure isn't fatal." Mike Ditka
Agate Stalactite Polished Solar Quartz
http://etsy.me/2fyprY2 via @Etsy
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“If you cannot do great things, do small things in a great way.” — Napoleon Hill

Have a great week!
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7/16/17
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Enjoy the show!

July 15-16—DARRINGTON, WASHINGTON: Annual show; Darrington Rock and Gem Club, Mansford Grange; 1265 Railroad Avenue; Sat. 10-5, Sun. 10-5; Free Admission
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Two gems that are alternatives to sapphire. Benitoite and Tanzanite.


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7/14/17
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7/14/17
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Happy Birthday July - Your birthstone is ruby!!

Rubies and sapphires are made of aluminum oxide (corundum). The red in rubies is caused by trace amounts of chrominum. The redder the ruby, the more chrominum. Some rubies are bicolored or multicolored. Rubies grow in crystal form and belong to the hexagonal family of shapes, before cutting and polishing.

Crimson with just a tinge of blue, rubies can be even more valuable than diamonds. A ruby ring sold at auction five years ago for $4 million. Crown jewels always display the fire-glow of rubies. Like diamonds, rubies are cherished for their color, clarity, cut and weight. Similarly, a large single ruby will bring a higher price than two smaller stones of equal weight and quality. Especially prized are stones exhibiting a six-rayed star when viewed from above. Transparent rubies are valued more than those with tiny, visible inclusions.

Can be cleaned in ultrasonic cleaners.
Rubies come from Burma, Thailand, and Ceylon. In biblical times, and prehistoric time, they came from Mogok and Burma. Ancient prehistoric tools and ruby chips found by archeologists give rise to this knowledge, and the mines of Mogok are still in operation.

In 1988, a 15.97 carat ruby sold for $3,630,000.00, that's $227,300.00 per carat. High quality rubies of one carat, are many times more rare than diamonds of one carat and can cost more.

This stone was given as offerings to Buddha in China and Krishna in India.

A common belief was that dreaming of rubies meant the coming of success in business, money matters, and love.

The ruby is thought to change colors (grow darker) when the owner was in danger or when a illness was coming. It was also thought that it would chase off the spirits of the dead and evil spirits not contained in hell.

In China and Europe, in the 10th century, dragons and snakes were carved in their surfaces to increase the flow of money and power to their owners.

Courtesy of the Jeweler’s Bench
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Do you love Pyrite?: http://etsy.me/1CW4MUi
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7/10/17
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Mica is a mineral name given to a group of minerals that are physically and chemically similar. They are all silicate minerals, known as sheet silicates because they form in distinct layers. Micas are fairly light and relatively soft, and the sheets and flakes of mica are flexible. Mica is heat-resistant and does not conduct electricity. There are 37 different mica minerals. The most common include: purple lepidolite, black biotite, brown phlogopite and clear muscovite.

More mica: https://www.etsy.com/shop/FenderMinerals?ref=seller-platform-mcnav&search_query=mica
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