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Bob Waldron
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418 followers
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I recently developed a concept proposal for an unconference on communities centered around some of the Richard Rohr's concepts of compassionate action and contemplation (need unconference co-organizers...). The communal living article below has aspects that would be interesting discussion material at the unconference.

Was also looking at the upcoming Mozilla Festival (https://2015.mozillafestival.org/) and would love to participate in the session on computational sociology (https://github.com/mozilla/mozfest-program/issues/521). Being an engineer and a fan of Hari Seldon, it seems there must be value for applying technology to formation and maintenance of high-value social groups or networks.

http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/Tech-entrepreneurs-revive-communal-living-4988388.php

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Mealku is an interesting case study for a hybrid social network (online & offline). "But food is also the most vulnerable product we could possibly share. Salmonella will always be a more real, ever-present danger than, say, renting an Airbnb room from an axe murderer...Mealku addresses this by, first, sending "welcome cooks" to evaluate the kitchens – and the motives – of every person who wants to cook in the network. They poke through fridges, into cupboards, and under sinks, homing in on expiration dates...Mealku also has a slightly less objective standard: "No lazy, crazy or selfish people are allowed.""

http://www.citylab.com/tech/2013/08/sharing-economy-want-change-way-you-eat-dinner/6389/

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Civic hacking meetup at The Avenue HQ in Appleton, WI, USA tonight, July 22, starting at 6 PM

http://dhmncivichacks.blogspot.com/2015/07/civic-hacking-today-722-at-avenue-hq.html

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+justin kruger as a JavaScript ninja, do you think Dart has a reasonable chance of being as big as or bigger than JavaScript in five years?  "...Dart meanwhile is Google’s open-source Web programming language, which has an ultimate goal of replacing JavaScript..." http://thenextweb.com/google/2013/11/21/google-building-chrome-app-based-development-environment-using-dart-polymer/ 

+thomas knoll , I got your Nov 6 email asking about the status of my proposed DEMO Las Vegas project. Sent a reply, and a couple followups on that reply, but no word back from you, so it looks like maybe my emails are still being filtered out. Am still very interested in working with you to get the proposal in front of Tony Hsieh. Is there a different email address I should use to connect with you, or should I give you a phone / +Hangout / Skype call? Thanks!

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+justin kruger , in case you didn't see it, there's a recent article about Jeff Hawkins you might want to look at
http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2013/07/the-intuition-machine/309392/

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+justin kruger , apologies if you posted this and I missed your post, but if you didn't read this, it's likely of interest to you,
http://www.wired.com/business/2013/04/kurzweil-google-ai/

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Here's a cool post about Nikola Tesla:
http://zachtratar.com/tesla.html

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Fantastic post which I think illustrates well the type of organic growth G+ is having and will continue to have. This type of resilient organic growth bodes well for G+ longevity. G+ users are there because they're getting something valuable out of participating on G+, not simply because they heard or know that lots of other people are on it. When people have to try it out and discover the usefulness and value of G+, that will help maintain a high signal to noise ratio much more so than G+ becoming a viral phenomenon. Yay, Rosa!
One user at a time...
I rolled my eyes when "the Google+ project" — Google's umpteenth attempt to take on "social" — was announced on June 28, 2011. But I found myself curious about the whole thing, so I tweeted: "What's a girl gotta do to get a Google+ invite around here?"

Despite finding an invitation in my inbox minutes later, I didn't bother posting anything to Google+ until July 10, 2011. That first post of mine received 123 comments and 41 +1s by the end of the next day. Nonetheless, I allowed the general consensus — that Google+ is D.O.A. and a "ghost town" — to get the better of me and ignored the social network for the most part. I often copy-and-pasted whatever I happened to be posting to my Facebook page to Google+ and ... well, that was it. I don't think I even bothered to check my notifications more than once every few weeks.

Then I attended Google I/O 2012 and had candid conversations with a Googler or two. Their passion for the product was enough to make me hesitate and reconsider my immediate dismissal of Google+.

"Some guy — who happens to do something at Google — made me promise that I'll start actually using Google+ properly," I began a Google+ post on June 29, 2012. "A promise is a promise .... so here I am, typing words."

Over the next two months, I diligently used Google+. I posted photos, shared my thoughts on random topics, revealed how terrible my taste in music can be, tried Hangouts, interacted with those who commented on my posts, and so on. I watched my follower count grow from about 11,000 to over 240,000.

"I may have misjudged Google+ the first time around," I remarked at that point. The Googler who cajoled me into giving Google+ a second chance smiled knowingly and said something about convincing "one user at a time."

I rolled my eyes again. But I kept using Google+.

And now? Well, now it's been nine-and-a-half months and over 1,100 publicly shared posts since the day I really started using Google+. I'm watching the follower count on my profile approach 1 million and I'm smiling at the many memories that probably wouldn't exist if it weren't for "the Google+ project."

This user is convinced.

Photo by +Vincent Mo.
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