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Ronald Swope
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Ears, Nose and Throat Treatment for Cancer - Care of Dr. Richard Isaacs
 

 
Have you encountered this big word “otolaryngology”? Quite a mouthful indeed! It comprises of four root words put together to form a new medical term: otic (of the ear), olfactory (pertaining to the nose) and larynx (or the throat) and logy (the study or the care of). Hence, it simply refers to the medical study and care of diseases and problems that beset our ears, nose and throat.
 
Whereas, previously the eyes were part of the three in the former medical acronym EENT, ENT (shorter and simpler way) now refers only to the said vital three organs of the human anatomy, particularly because they are directly interrelated not only in their proximity to one another but also in their functions. The eyes comprise a highly-specialized function although not entirely unrelated to that of the three.
 
So, what is otolarynologic method used for tumors? Let us first describe briefly the connection of the three for a better appreciation of what Dr. Isaacs(https://www.facebook.com/Dr-Richard-Isaacs-548663725287413) can offer for patients suffering this kind of problem.
 
The nose, perhaps, the most prominent of the three, is connected to the throat as well as throat through passageways that allow the air we breathe to be conducted into our lungs. Although the ear was not designed as an air passage, it does allow air to enter through the ear canal with the help of valves that control the intake or outtake. Often, when we cough or sneeze, we can feel some air forced out of our ears and even experience slight deafening when we have colds because of some clogging of the passageways. At times, when we travel up the mountain, we can have the same effect when the pressure inside our ears is higher than that outside. Yawning can easily remove the discomfort by opening up the valves and equalizing the pressure in and out.
 
That is a simple description of the three organs as they relate with one another at their optimal level of functioning. But what if something happens to either one of these organs? Or especially, for example, if a tumor grows in any one of them? We know that cancer cells can occur in any part of the human body. For smokers, often the effect on the throat (not to mention the lungs) is patently tragic as it bears the brunt of the toxins and carcinogens carried by the cigarette smoke.
 
Dr. Rich Isaacs’ expertise will remove tumors or cancer cells from the throat, as well as the ears and nose, through his wide knowledge and experience in otolaryngologic procedures obtained from many years of practice in this field, among other fields he is involved in. His know-how regarding how these organs function and how they can malfunction forms a strong foundation for treating them whenever issues in structure, function and general muscular or cellular conditions arise.
 
Dr. Isaacs provides a complete range of diagnostic, medical, and surgical(https://plus.google.com/communities/111898403072094013868) services for ear, nose, and throat conditions, particularly cancer. Evaluation, diagnosis and/or direct treatment of these conditions which may include chronic ear infections, hearing loss, sinusitis, tonsillitis, airway problems, cysts, and tumors of the head and neck, comprise some of the problems he and his staff are capable of addressing with their professional and expert care.
 
Dr. Richard Isaacs(http://www.manta.com/c/mx5m8k3/dr-richard-isaacs) has practiced with Kaiser Permanente from 1995 to the present and has Advanced Certification in Head and Neck Oncologic Surgery to his name. He specializes, in particular, in orbital, nasal, and maxillofacial surgery and also in thyroid and parathyroid surgery. His many years of experience in otolaryngologic procedure for tumors at the skull base has made him a valuable regional resource for the treatment of advanced tumors of the head and neck.

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Dr. Richard Isaacs Specializes in Head and Neck Surgical Oncology

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Dr. Richard Isaacs - Provides Otolaryngoloic Treatment for Cancer

 

Dr. Richard Isaacs(https://www.scribd.com/user/295340238/Richard-Isaacs-MD) has been a valuable part of Kaiser Permanente since 1995 and possesses Advanced Certification in Head and Neck Oncologic Surgery, with specialties in orbital, nasal, and maxillofacial surgery, as well as thyroid and parathyroid surgery. His works as a regional resource for the management of advanced tumors of the head and neck and provides the otolaryngologic procedure for tumors at the skull base.

In addition, he is trained in Facial Plastic and Reconstructive surgery and has an interest in post-tumor facial reconstruction and facial reanimation surgery.

But what is this otolarynologic procedure used for head tumors? Let us briefly explain to get a better appreciation of what Dr. Isaacs(http://richardisaacsmd.blogspot.com/) offers for patients with this kind of problem.

Otolaryngology simply refers to medical attention given to ear, nose and throat conditions. Whereas in the recent past, EENT put all these three together, that is, including the eye, ENT (perhaps, a shorter and simpler way) now only refers to the said vital three organs of the human anatomy, especially because they are connected and related not only in terms of distance to one another but also in their functions.

The nose, probably the most conspicuous among the three, is connected to the ear, as well as to the throat through passageways that allow the air we breathe to be conducted into our body interiors. Although the ear was not specifically designed to serve as a passage for any fluid, whether air or liquid, it does allow air to enter through the ear canal with the help of valves that control the intake or outtake. Hence, every time we cough or sneeze, we can feel some air going out of our ears and even feel a bit slight hearing loss during colds due to some clogging of the passageways. Likewise, when we climb up a mountain, we can experience the same effect when the pressure inside our ears is higher relative to that of the pressure outside. This is easily solved through yawning, which alleviates the discomfort by opening up the ears valves and equalizing the external and internal pressures.

That is a simple description of the three organs as they relate with one another at their optimal level of functioning. But what if something happens to either one of these organs? Or especially, if a tumor grows in any one of them? We know that cancer cells can occur in any part of the human body. For smokers, often the effect of the habit on the throat (not to mention the lungs) is patently tragic as it bears the brunt of the toxins and carcinogens carried by the cigarette smoke.

This is where Dr. Rich Isaacs’(https://medium.com/dr-richard-isaacs) expertise comes in. Removing tumors or cancer cells from the throat, as well as the ears and nose, requires a wide knowledge and experience in otolaryngologic procedures which he has acquired as a top practitioner in the field, among other fields he practices. Knowing how these organs function is a vital part of treating them when they encounter issues in structure, function and general muscular or cellular conditions.

Dr. Isaacs provides a complete range of diagnostic, medical, and surgical services for ear, nose, and throat conditions, particularly cancer. Evaluation, diagnosis and/or direct treatment of these conditions which may include chronic ear infections, hearing loss, sinusitis, tonsillitis, airway problems, cysts, and tumors of the head and neck, comprise some of the problems he and his staff are capable of addressing with their professional and expert care.

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Dr. Richard Isaacs, MD: The Willingness to Serve

In the modern world, the desire or the willingness to help others solve their problems is not complete without coming out of the confines of one’s comfortable world into the broader community of people struggling through life, in need or in pain.The Internet has helped to bring this eagerness to reach out to others to its fulfillment -- especially in the field of medicine or medical practice, as it should be more properly called by those who are charged with administering health care to the ailing patient.

Medical practice is obviously a wide subject and incorporates so many different aspects of health-care and variations of methods or approaches, from traditional, alternative and even emotional in nature. The majority of people, however, depend on the general field of medical practice recognized by most societies and governments as the scientific and professional field of health-care provided by products of Schools of Medicine and are referred to as Doctors of Medicine (MD’s).

The more common term “physician” has also become synonymous with MD. To be a physician, in general, is to be qualified to provide essential health care using methods recognized by most public institutions as in keeping with accepted modern medical practices. This does not mean, of course, that ancient practices which have proven to be effective are without value in the modern medical profession. It only means that we have progressed to the level of fine-tuning the human capability to provide health care and to alleviate the sufferings of millions of sick people. And the people tasked with providing such highly-specialized skills also possess higher amounts of persistence, diligence and self-sacrifice than most people.

Dr. Richard Isaacs, MD, is a prime example of the qualified modern physician who has made good use of the worldwide web to present his credentials and his services to those who require medical care or assistance. A lot of people might either be surprised or turned off by such a direct approach to promoting one’s profession to the greater virtual community out there. That is because it might come out as somewhat demeaning to the noble profession of the physician which many consider to be more altruistic or service-oriented than most other vocations.

But that was common in the older times when medical practitioners worked silently in the bigger institutions, hospitals or hole-in-the-wall clinics they worked in. Today, doctors form so-called poly-clinics to provide a para-hospital alternative facilities for providing diagnostic and consultancy services. Most doctors, in the past, made do with putting up a sign on their home front-door as simple private general practitioners with a handful of devoted patients in their immediate neighborhood or locality.

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Richard Isaacs MD: The fight of his life

A Makahu father with a rare form of cancer is being denied a drug that may give him more time with his four young children.

James Grieve, 44, was diagnosed with Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumour (DSRCT) last July, when the family were living in Perth.

Grieve told his oncologist the family, who were originally from Britain, were only in Perth on a work visa and he and his wife Victoria wanted to take their children home to Taranaki.

But they were told it was a very aggressive sarcoma and he had to start chemo straight away, Grieve said.

"He made it clear I was going to die. I was going through chemo because I have four kids and something was better than nothing."

After six rounds of chemo, nothing had changed, he said, so they came home.

But before they left, Grieve's oncologist in Australia gave him three months worth of a trial drug, Pazopanib, which may inhibit the tumour's growth and give him more time with his four young children.

However, back home in New Zealand Pharmac won't fund the drug, which costs $10,000 for three months supply.

In a letter to MidCentral oncologist Dr Richard Isaacs, Pharmac said if Grieve was granted Pazopanib, people with other soft tissue sarcomas would also apply, because there was no clinical evidence to support the use of the drug specifically for DSCRT rather than other soft tissue sarcomas.

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Richard Isaacs MD: Kaiser South gets Level II trauma certification

Kaiser Permanente’s South Sacramento Medical Center has been verified by the American College of Surgeons as a Level II trauma center.

The center got provisional verification by the group last year so it could begin operations, but the process requires reviewers to evaluate the program after it is up and running.

Reviewers conducted another on-site review in March to evaluate trauma center staff, equipment and other resources to make sure they meet national standards. Full verification will be in effect until 2013.

Since opening Aug. 1, the new South Sacramento trauma center has treated an average of 150 patients per month.

“We are extremely proud that the American College of Surgeons has verified that our program meets their stringent standards,” Dr. Richard Isaacs, physician-in-chief at Kaiser Permanente South 

Sacramento, said in a press release. “We have an excellent staff here and we are committed to caring for some of the area’s most critically injured patients.”

The South Sacramento hospital serves an area from Interstate 5 east to Rancho Cordova, and from Florin Road south to the San Joaquin County line.

The trauma center is a first for Kaiser Permanente nationwide.

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Dr. Richard Isaacs: Kaiser’s summer internship program

Kaiser’s summer internship program gives high school students a chance to see if medical field is right for them

Valley High School senior Faith Allison thought she was interested in cardiology when she started a paid internship at Kaiser Permanente’s South Sacramento Medical Center this summer, but she liked the variety she saw in trauma.

Luther Burbank graduate Melany Caldera figured “you can’t go wrong with health care,” but she got dizzy every time she saw blood. Human resources, she likes.

The idea behind the Kaiser internship program is to give underrepresented and low-income students a close-up view of the career promise of health care before they make a career choice. A comprehensive program that focuses on careers in demand, it can also serve as a pipeline for future Kaiser employees.

“It’s really important for people who have an interest to see their destination before they begin their journey,” said Dr. Richard Isaacs, physician-in-chief at Kaiser’s South Sacramento hospital. “Our hope is they will go back to their own community with a better idea of what they can and want to do.”

The Summer Youth Employment Program is one of the community benefits Kaiser offers in exchange for tax-exempt status. There are 215 participants in Northern California this summer, about 30 in the Sacramento area.

Eleven high-achieving students were selected from 150 applicants for internships at Kaiser South Sacramento.

The full-time program runs for eight weeks. Students do workshops, projects and rotations in departments, meet weekly to share information — and get paid $8 an hour at a time when many high school students have trouble getting a job.

Other local health systems offer internship programs for high school students, too. But most are unpaid.

“Any organized professional experience we can expose young people to — and high school seems to be the focus now — can pique interest in and provide direction for college and medical school,” said Scott Seamons, regional vice president of the Hospital Council of Northern and Central California.

A lot of exposure’

Karima Ziyarmal, now 23, was a 2006 summer intern at Kaiser’s South Sacramento hospital.

For more related topic:
http://www.vitals.com/doctors/Dr_Richard_Isaacs.html
http://drexel.edu/medicine/News-Events/news-archive/2014/December/Celebrating-Kaiser-Permanente-as-Regional-Medical-Campus
http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-1271606
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