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Intrepid Science
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There's still so much to discover about our planet. Join Professor Chris Turney and his Intrepid Science team as they explore the world.
There's still so much to discover about our planet. Join Professor Chris Turney and his Intrepid Science team as they explore the world.

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#Venus and #Jupiter bright over New Zealand’s beautiful Marlborough Sounds tonight. What a wonderful sight!
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A really important new study just published in +Nature News & Comment looking at Antarctica’s response to warming. The team led by Kevin Welsh at the University of Queensland investigated sediment cores offshore from the Wilkes Basin (Adélie Land), a sector of the ice sheet which sits on the ocean bed and holds enough ice to raise global sea level by more than 3 meters. Welsh and his colleagues looked back hundreds of thousands of years and found each time the planet became warmer than present day – up to 2˚C warmer – the Wilkes lost a considerable amount of ice, contributing to the globally higher sea levels. Yet another study that shows we really don’t want a 2˚C warmer planet. #mission2020 #AdelieLand
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Back burning around Sydney created a beautiful sunrise this morning! +UNSW Sydney
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Spectacular Blood Moon over Sydney this morning!

#bloodmoon #fulleclipse +UNSW Sydney +UNSW Alumni #lunareclipse
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Something very special is happening this Saturday. We are having a total lunar eclipse and it will last for a mighty 1 hr 43 minutes: the longest in a century! And the great news is here in Australia we will have front view seats.

In Sydney, the Earth will start to move between the Moon and Sun at 04.23 am (AEST), casting a long shadow on our lunar neighbour. During the very start of the eclipse, what little light that does reach the Moon will take a relatively long path through our planet's atmosphere, delivering a magnificent red glow – something known as a 'Blood Moon'. You'll need to look to the southwest, and weather-permitting, you should get a spectacular view just about the horizon.

But if you can't face braving the early morning chill, the total eclipse begins at 05.30 (AEST) and will continue until sunrise – still early but maybe not quite as bad...

For those wanting to capture the best possible images of this event, there is an excellent article on Gizmodo (see link below!).

#eclipse #fulleclipse #bloodmoon +UNSW Sydney
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Interested in doing a PhD using cutting-edge #research to solve complex problems and improve the lives of people in local and global communities? PhD projects for +UNSW Sydney's #Scientia #Scholarships are now open.

As part of the #Scientia #Scholarship scheme we're very excited to announce a PhD called 'Back to the Future: Climate Impacts during the Last Interglacial'. The supervisory team is Zoë Thomas, Chris Turney and Andy Baker. The Last Interglacial (130,000-116,000 years ago) is the most recent ‘super-interglacial’, providing an analogue for future change. This project will use lake and coastal sedimentary and speleothem sequences to reconstruct Last Interglacial climate and environmental changes on sub-decadal to millennial timescales across Australia. The candidate will be part of the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage (CABAH), which is a major new research and education initiative that brings together leading Australian universities with strategically important Australian and international partners (https://epicaustralia.org.au).

With tuition fees covered, a stipend of A$40k/year and up to $10k/yr for building your career and supporting your international research collaborations, this is an incredible opportunity to join a high-impact research team at a world top 100 university.

You can find out further details here: https://www.2025.unsw.edu.au/apply/scientia-phd-scholarships/back-future-climate-impacts-during-last-interglacial. Or feel free to contact Zoë as lead supervisor at z.thomas@unsw.edu.au.

Deadline for applications: 20 July 2018.
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Beautiful halo around the Moon tonight over Wollongong!
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Have humans become a geological superpower? Searching for global human impact using the loneliest tree in the world (clue: it's in the Southern Ocean!).

You can listen to my Friday interview on the ABC's Radio National's Blueprint for Living show at http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/blueprintforliving/the-worlds-loneliest-tree/9690562. Hope you enjoy it!
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Had a fascinating interview on +ABC Australia Radio National Blueprint for Living. We discussed our latest research from the ARC Centre of Excellence in Australian Biodiversity and Heritage (CABAH): defining the start of a new human-dominated geological epoch, the #Anthropocene. There’s increasing evidence that humans are the new geological superpower. I’ll post the link as soon as it’s available. In the meantime, if you’d like to learn more you can read our Conversation article at https://www.google.com.au/amp/s/theconversation.com/amp/anthropocene-began-in-1965-according-to-signs-left-in-the-worlds-loneliest-tree-91993
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In 2019, a British team is heading south to search for the wreck of the Endurance, Sir Ernest Shackleton's famous ship lost to the crushing pressure of pack ice in the Weddell Sea back in 1915. As a result, Shackleton and his men found themselves stuck in the ice for two years. A thousand kilometres from civilisation, they faced isolation, starvation, freezing temperatures, gangrene, wandering icebergs and the threat of cannibalism. But by sheer positive attitude and superb leadership, the Anglo-Irishman kept his team together and returned everyone home. No matter how bad conditions became, Shackleton didn't lose a single life. And they even found time to do science! Discovering the final resting place of the Endurance would complete an extraordinary journey.

If you want to learn more, check out https://www.coolantarctica.com/Antarctica%20fact%20file/History/Shackleton-Endurance-Trans-Antarctic_expedition2.php

#Shackleton #Endurance

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