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Radomir Dopieralski (deshipu)
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Robot Master Chef Cooks 2,000 Recipes, Cleans Up, Does the Dishes

Would you buy it?

More at: http://www.industrytap.com/robot-master-chef-cooks-2000-recipes-cleans-dishes/28765
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New version of tcod-rs. New stuff, better (and safer!) way to handle root and offscreen consoles and more! Plus it works on Rust beta (and therefore Rust 1.0.0 in a week and a half).

Admit it -- you've always wanted to write a roguelike in Rust. The time's never been better.

http://www.aimlesslygoingforward.com/2015/05/05/tcod-rs-version-0-6-0-is-out/
The Rust bindings for libtcod are now at version 0.6.0 \o/ tcod-rs is a library for writing roguelike (and other ASCII based) games. It provides a character-based drawing interface, bitmap fonts, path finding and field of view and...
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+Radomir Dopieralski nomination for tentacle of the day #pyrkon
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Tentacle of the day.

Thanks to +Laurens Van Houtven 
  Brisbane-based artist Michael Palmer creates these fierce looking sea-dwelling creatures that sit within a dainty teacup full of “tea.” The “tea” is actually resin, so you can’t drink out of these. Bummer. More than anything, they’re just awesome to look at and would make a cool gift for someone. Even though an Ood from Doctor Who doesn’t technically live in water, I’d like to see one of those within a teacup. You can purchase these cups f...
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Tentacle of the day.
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Build your own quadruped robot and experiment with different gaits, sensors and additional modules.
What is Tote?¶. It's a small walking robot, designed to be as cheap and simple to build as possible, while at the same time serving as a starting point for more complex projects and for teaching. In its basic form it just walks around and turns, controlled by a TV remote, but it can be easily ...
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Red Dwarf Series XI and XII Announced!
As the entire population of the world obsesses over the birth of a baby in London, 3 million light years away in a substantial space vessel belonging to the Jupiter Mining Corporation, 4 hopeless smegheads prepare for more adventures.
Red Dwarf Series XI and XII
Recording starts late October 2015.
12 new episodes.
Broadcast on Dave in the UK, and no doubt on many other channels globally.
Shed loads of Smeg Ups
Original cast (they couldn't get anyone decent to do it)
Original writer (Doug-Chief of Comedy Police-Naylor)
About 18 kilos of rubber, 12 H's, a lot of hair extensions, sequins, Vindaloo and a new smeg hammer.
#deepjoy  
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Yes, Yes, Yes! 
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Supporting old releases of infrastructure software becomes more and more expensive over time. Thats why upstream generally set time limits. E.g. Python M.N will be supported for X months. And then we'll review. The higher up the stack you go, the smaller the user base, the less resources to do long term support, and often the smaller the codebase - so it hard to draw a predictive line... but nearly everyone eventually says 'No, I won't fix that bug in that old release: you can use a new release.'

The challenge then, is when that new release depends on a lower layer component that is not available to the user. For instance, recent Sphinx no longer runs on Python 3.2. There are four things a user can do: 1) suffer the bug they wanted fixed. 2) Fix it themselves [perhaps by backporting from a fix in the new release]. 3) Upgrade the dependency (e.g. from Python 3.2 to 3.3). 4) Complain at upstream that this change has occurred.

Red Hat provide engineering services to their users to do 2) for them for a range of software that typically goes about half way up a stack. E.g. Linux, libc, Python, not-Django, not-sqlalchemy etc etc.

Customers of Red Hat then will have one of two discussions with the top of the stack: a) We're willing to help support our old dependencies, please just keep it in CI and we're there with you. E.g. 2) above. Or b) we're using your software but we need Python 2.6 [Now, until recently it was 2.4 :).] - e.g. 4) above.

Now a) isn't all sunshine and roses - supporting 2.6 means not using anything new introduced since it was frozen, unless there's a backport of it... if a backport can even be done. I support backports of The Python stdlib modules traceback. linecache and unittest - and for all of them I support 2.6 because users tell me they still use 2.6. Thats a bit of column a) and  bit of column b) - I don't deeply care about 2.6, but I'm willing to ensure at least syntax compat and tests passing: deeper analysis or effort I'll push onto folk that directly care.

I think Alex intends to take aim mostly at b) above, but he appears to blame RH for that existing. RH are not the only organisation offering long term support for infrastructure, merely the most successful (AFAICT). Aiming at RH specifically is IMO unreasonable: they're merely enabling folk to ask the question about the next layer up. AIUI all RH's patches are publically accessible. We can and should criticise RH for how readily accessible they are: See https://lwn.net/Articles/430098/ for context on that.

There is no onus on open source projects to say 'yes' to a) above: its entirely reasonable to say 'hey, your dependency is no longer supported upstream, we're not going to try and support it downstream.' There's also a half-way house: "If you have a patch that doesn't detract from our code base, sure we can incorporate it." Or "You're welcome to run a branch of off master for your needs, and to share the bugtracker."
And for b) projects need to learn to say "no" more. Supporting unsupported dependencies has real costs that hold code bases back: they make them unclear, hard to support and fragile. Upstream can't take on the job of supporting everything that once was.

So - push users towards the half-way house a: a branch of their own... and if thats too much effort, and there's not enough interest to spin up a consultancy around it... well thats a pretty clear sign that its not really needed.

https://alexgaynor.net/2015/mar/30/red-hat-open-source-community/
Red Hat has a pretty interesting business model, which is offering support for software that is a decade old, and which its maintainers want nothing to do with. This post isn't about whether maintaining old software is a good or a bad idea. It's about the effect it has on the community.
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Tentacle of the day.
Naturhistoriska Riksmuseet/Simon Stalenhag 2014.
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Garvalf W.'s profile photo
 
Hope you'll like this one as well:
http://museum-of-artifacts.tumblr.com/image/96721772397
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Hej Wszystkim! W środę na cotygodniowych warsztatach PyLadies Poland będzie można ogarnąć TkIntera! Zapraszamy o 18:30 do Centrum Wykładowego Politechniki Poznańskiej. Więcej info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1652424494986208/1652430181652306/
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TkInter, czyli szybkie GUI w Pythonie. Obsługa aplikacji uruchamianych w konsoli bywa bardzo wygodna dla specjalistów. Udostępnienie programu szerszej grupie odbiorców często wiąże się jednak z koniecznością zbudowania przystępnego interfejsu graficznego. Powstało wiele bibliotek umożliwiających ...
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Python programmer, wiki enthusiast, robot builder, miniature painter, Linux user, roguelike games developer and player, SciFi fan.