Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Terry Dawson
1 follower -
Writer, blogger and a tech fan
Writer, blogger and a tech fan

1 follower
About
Posts

Post has shared content
Had to look at this twice - amazing.
45 Of The Most Powerful Photos of 2013!
Link: www.webburgr.com/powerful-images-2013/
Here you’ll see 45 pictures from the year 2013, each of which are incredibly powerful in their own way. Beautiful, heartwarming, but certainly heartbreaking. 
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
you are having a laugh! Not for me
Suspended Boulder, Kjerag Mountains, Norway

Kjeragbolten is a Norwegian boulder, located in the Kjerag mountain in Rogaland, Norway. The rock itself is a 5 m³ glacial deposit wedged in the mountain's crevasse. It is a popular tourist destination and is accessible without any climbing equipment, however it is suspended above 984-meter deep abyss. It is also a popular site for BASE jumping.

Rogaland lies in a weak tectonic zone, allowing the river to dig into the surrounding sandstone fjord. During the several ice ages, which are known in Scandinavia, Norway was completely covered in glaciers. Between the ice ages, the meltwater reformed and reformed the valley up to twenty two times. After the last ice age, the global warming caused a rise in sea level, flooding the fjords. The boulder was deposited during the last glacial period, at around 50,000 B.C.E. As the Norwegian Glacier melted, it was accompanied by a rebound in rock formations as the ice was removed. In Kjeragbolten's case, the rebound was actually faster than the rising sea level, which wedged the rock into its current position.
http://www.piccentre.com/2013/04/suspended-boulder-kjerag-mountains.html
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
The Coldest Place on Earth
Image Credit: Ted Scambos (National Snow and Ice Data Center) et al., Landsat 8, USGS, +NASA
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap131211.html

How cold can it get on Earth? In the interior of the Antarctica, a record low temperature of 93.2 °C (135.8 °F) has been recorded. This is about 25 °C (45 °F) colder than the coldest lows noted for any place humans live permanently. The record temperature occurred in 2010 August - winter in Antarctica - and was found by scientists sifting through decades of climate data taken by Earth-orbiting satellites. The coldest spots were found near peaks because higher air is generally colder, although specifically in depressions near these peaks because relatively dense cold air settled there and was further cooled by the frozen ground. Summer is a much better time to visit Antarctica, as some regions will warm up as high as 15 °C (59 °F).
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
Yay I finally got an Google enhanced winter picture to share!
Animated Photo
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded