Profile

Cover photo
Erik J. Scully
Works at Harvard University
Attends Harvard University
1,919 followers|10,128 views
AboutPostsPhotos

Stream

 
 
Tackling the global scourge: Nature calls for an intergovernmental panel on antibiotic resistance 
When antibiotics came on the scene beginning with the discovery of Penicillin, they were revolutionary saving the lives of millions and creating an albeit short lived visions of conquering deadly infectious diseases. With widespread use and often misuse with the most infamous being the widespread use of antibiotics as "growth promoters" for farm animals, the scourge of antibiotic resistance was an evolutionary certainty. After all most antibiotics (the lead molecules) existed in nature we stumbled on them and they were produced by environmental microbes (mostly fungi or streptomyces) to gain advantage over other microbes. Introduce sufficient selection pressures as would happen with widespread use in cattle feed, emergence of widespread resistance was natural. 
We have reached a situation, this is no longer isolated cases in remote places but a reality all over the world. If you are struck with a deadly resistant strain, there is little any one can do. In a competitive world driven by economics, global action is needed to control misuse of antibiotics and curtail their spread while increasing public funding for development of new classes of antibiotics. 
Significant part of the problem is the lack of investment in developing new antibiotics. Big pharmaceutical companies see little profit in antimicrobial. They would rather invest in money spinning sector like chronic lifestyle diseases or cancer where opportunities to extract ransom are greater. Here Mark Woolhouse and Jeremy Farrar call for an intergovernmental panel to coordinate global efforts in tackling this scourge. #antimicrobialresistance   #policy   #WHO  
1
Add a comment...

Erik J. Scully

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Thanks for the hands and feet coelacanth!!!
1
Add a comment...

Erik J. Scully

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
They're baaaack! And you can build a sensor and participate in a monitoring project. Looks like a great thing for makers...  (attn. +Mad Art Lab )
1
Add a comment...

Erik J. Scully

Curator's Choice - Mods only  - 
 
Everyone, be sure to check out Harvard HEB professor +Katie Hinde's Mammal March Madness. Fill out your brackets at http://mammalssuck.blogspot.com/ and cheer on the Dik-Dik as it takes on the Elephant in the first round. I'm smelling upset!
1
Add a comment...

Erik J. Scully

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Join me and a bunch of scientists on Friday in Washington DC. We'll be talking about "De-Extinction"--the possibility of using cloning and DNA sequencing to bring some species back from oblivion.

(My vote goes to the Stellar Sea Cow, the 25-foot-manatee cousin eaten to extinction in the 1760s.)

http://tedxdeextinction.org
1
Add a comment...

Erik J. Scully

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
What are you doing tomorrow night, Chicago?  Wish I could go!!!!

Chicago's own Dr. Neil Shubin has been a major force behind a new evolutionary synthesis of expeditionary paleontology, developmental genetics, and genomics. He is the author of the bestselling Your Inner Fish. The Illinois Science Council has partnered with the Chicago Public Library to host Dr. Shubin discussing his new book THE UNIVERSE WITHIN: Discovering the Common History of Rocks, Planets, and People. With this work he answers a scientific mystery story as big as the world itself: How have astronomical events that took place millions of years ago created the unique qualities of the human species?


Monday, February 11, 2013     6:00pm
Chicago Public Library, Pritzker Auditorium
Harold Washington Library Center
400 S. State Street, Chicago
FREE and open to the public

In Your Inner Fish, Neil Shubin delved into the amazing connections between human anatomy-our hands, our jaws-and the structures in the fish that first took over land 375 million years ago. Now, with his trademark clarity and exuberance, he takes an even more expansive approach to the question of why we are the way we are. Starting once again with fossils, Shubin turns his gaze skyward.  He shows how the entirety of the universe's 14-billion-year history can be seen in our bodies. From our very molecular composition (a result of stellar events at the origin of our solar system), he makes clear, through the working of our eyes, how the evolution of the cosmos has had profound effects on the development of human life on earth. 
1
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
1,919 people
Jovan Maud's profile photo

Erik J. Scully

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Carnivorous Plant Throws out 'Junk' DNA:

New research shows that the Utricularia gibba genome contains almost no noncoding DNA, demonstrating that vast quantities of this so-called "junk DNA" may not be necessary for complex life.

Read more: http://goo.gl/4joi6

[Article via: +Science Daily / +University at Buffalo / +Nature Publishing Group | Photo: A scanning electron micrograph shows the bladder of Utricularia gibba, the humped bladderwort plant. Via: Enrique Ibarra-Laclette, Claudia Anahí Pérez-Torres and Paulina Lozano-Sotomayor]
1
Add a comment...

Erik J. Scully

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Smacks and Wobbles

Gelada baboons live in the highlands of Ethiopia in very small troops, which band together in giant conglomerations to hang out in meadows and eat grass. There are a gazillion interesting things about them - for example, because they spend so much time sitting down and grazing, the usual place for sexual signals isn't visible. Instead, they have bright red patches on their chest - like most baboons' sexual swellings on their rumps, females' chest patches change in color and swell a little across the estrus cycle.

But what's gotten these guys in the news recently is their vocalizations. They chatter to eachother constantly. The similarities between gelada vocalizations, especially their periodicity and the required lip mobility to make these sounds, may be analagous to human language. Since this stuff is difficult, if not impossible, to reconstruct in the fossil record, showing that a living primate actually makes its vocalizations in similar ways to modern humans is very exciting! The Wired article includes video of geladas chatting to eachother, and it's hard to believe that it isn't human.

This short article is #openaccess  at Current Biology, so take a look!
Bergman TJ. Speech-like vocalized lip smacking in Geladas. Current Biology  23(7): R268-R269.
http://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(13)00209-1?large_figure=true

#scienceeveryday   #monkeymonday  
1
Add a comment...

Erik J. Scully

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Today's TED Talk: Monkeys that strategize and the neuroscience of game theory.
1
Add a comment...

Erik J. Scully

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
I thought I'd try to compile a list of free/oss Game Theory code

Last week I posted some +Python code: http://drvinceknight.github.com/Gamepy/

Have I missed any?

#gametheory     #sciencesunday  
1
Add a comment...

Erik J. Scully

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
When we plant trees, we plant the seeds of hope

Wangari Maathai was a professor of veterinary anatomy at University of Nairobi - the first East African woman to receive her PhD. She was a politician and a political activist who fought against state-sanctioned torture and for the rights of women in Kenya. She founded the Green Belt Movement, combining environmental justice and women's empowerment, helping to reforest Kenya and prevent erosion by funding women and women's collectives in tree planting. Dr. Maathai won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2004. Despite her death in 2011, the Green Belt Movement is still vital and active in Kenya and worldwide!

http://www.greenbeltmovement.org/

#internationalwomensday   #womensday   #steminspire  
1
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
1,919 people
Jovan Maud's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Graduate Student
Employment
  • Harvard University
    Graduate Assistant, 2012 - present
  • Villanova University
    Field Research - Akumal, Mexico, 2010 - 2012
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Story
Tagline
Harvard University, Villanova University
Introduction

I study the phylogeography of retroviruses that infect wild chimpanzees within Uganda, an emerging infectious disease hot spot. My research takes place at the interface of infectious disease, evolutionary biology, and wildlife ecology. I use non-invasive protocols, molecular methods, and phylogenetic inference to identify the  socio-ecological, demographic, and anthropogenic factors that influence viral diffusion among zoonotic reservoirs and contribute to emergence within human populations.

Education
  • Harvard University
    PhD - Human Evolutionary Biology, 2012 - present
  • Villanova University
    M.S. - Biology, 2010 - 2012
  • Villanova University
    B.S. - Biology, 2007 - 2011