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Sig Christenson
Worked at San Antonio Express-News
Attended University of Houston
Lives in San Antonio
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Sig Christenson

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There has long been talk of women facing the draft. The first step is requiring that they sign up with the Selective Service System, and that could be coming. St. Mary's School of Law professor Jeffrey Addicott thinks it's inevitable. South Texas College of law professor Geoffrey Corn who was in Europe and couldn't respond in time to get into the story, predicts Congress won't touch this one. 'I just think the entire issue of a draft, mandatory service, the burden on the all volunteer force, etc, is too politically charged. It seems to me like a Pandora's Box - once they open it for one purpose where will it go?'
Romo, in a speech he will give Friday at the National Press Club, notes the Pentagon is working with Congress to “address the legal implications” on “the male-only registration requirement” as well as on how to implement the decision to open all combat roles to women. “In the past, the courts have allowed the military wide discretion in the criteria to exclude based on a number of factors,” Addicott added, referring to weight, height, age, gende...
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Sig Christenson

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One historian tells me that Billy Mitchell is more revered in the Air Force than by the Army. He believed in a separate air service and was certain you could cripple a nation's capacity to wage war by mounting a strategic bombing campaign. He also envisioned jet aircraft, cruise missiles and the attack on Pearl Harbor. His vision of that attack 74 years ago this morning had it only half right, but Mitchell alone saw it coming - in 1924.
Rather than flying from aircraft carriers, Mitchell thought Japan would launch large numbers of long-range bombers from Pacific islands, Air Education and Training Command historian Gary Boyd said. “It’s really far out because at that time the airplanes that they had couldn’t carry significant amounts of bombs or even torpedoes, so he really projected future capabilities,” he said of Mitchell’s prediction, which was made at a time many people as...
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As coincidences go, it's a good one. A little more than six weeks after testifying in San Antonio on behalf of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, the man who investigated his case took the helm of the Army's Installation Management Command at Fort Sam Houston. Gen. Mark Milley, who ordered Bergdahl's hearing, cracked a few jokes at a ceremony here, one about a local general's hunting skills, but nothing was said about Outpost Mest.
Lt. Gen. Kenneth Dahl, the chief investigator of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl’s 2009 disappearance from Outpost Mest in Afghanistan, on Tuesday took the reins of the Army’s Installation Management Command at Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston. $86 million annual payroll — brought Dahl and another key player in the Bergdahl saga to San Antonio for a formal ceremony marked by jokes and frequent laughter. Halverson had led the command since April 2014 ...
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We all know a mother never stops loving for her children, but Juanita Segovia has never stopped grieving for her 'Betin,' as you'll see in the short video clip. She's cried for Heriberto Segovia Hernandez every day since his death in a firefight on Dec. 5, 1968. 'I don’t know why I’m here,' she said when we talked a few days ago. 'He’s gone.' H/t to my friend Billy Calzada, who captured so much of their love in a single portrait.
Heriberto Hernandez often volunteered for dangerous missions along canals and rivers to patrol against the Viet Cong, sometimes joining sailors in a 13-foot fiberglass Boston Whaler that had no armor or heavy weapons. On Dec. 5, 1968, Hernandez, 20, and three other Coast Guardsmen made a fateful journey up the Rach Nang River on the southernmost tip of Vietnam and became locked in a firefight that left him mortally wounded. Even now, she has a ...
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If you've seen 'The Great Escape,' you've met Wallace Kirkpatrick - after a fashion. A B-17 navigator, he fell into Luft Stalag III and became part of history as a "punguin." The best part of this story for me, though, is how much his kids and grandchildren love him.
Some said another U.S. bomber hit by German ground fire smashed into his B-17 Flying Fortress or that his plane clipped the wing of another aircraft, sending both into catastrophic tailspins. Col. Richard Lindlan of the Air Force Personnel Center paid tribute to Kirkpatrick, presenting five decorations under a program created by Congress to provide veterans with the medals they earned during their wartime service. Kirkpatrick, who helped in the...
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I said long ago that military medicine was the one true 'good-news' story that came out of our wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. It's an inspiring tale that includes troops trained to provide first-aid, Air Force and Army medical teams in Baghdad, Balad, Kandahar, Bagram Air Base, Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, and stateside hospitals. But the last stop on the long home, the Center for the Intrepid, may be the most amazing of all.
After suffering life-altering injuries that included amputations and burns, U.S. troops came to a $62 million rehabilitation facility built entirely with private donations. It was the first one of its kind in the Department of Defense, and has helped 1,300 military personnel get back on their feet.
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The few Pearl Harbor veterans still alive have stories that are burned into their souls William St. John, 94, came off the midnight shift with a shipmate. They were in a radio transmitter building surrounded by three 180-foot towers. Dawn broke on Sunday and suddenly the sky was filled with planes that dropped bombs and torpedoes. Then, in a chilling moment, the Japanese pilots made a bead straight for St. John and his friend.
[...] I could see the planes fly over us that morning — with another machinist’s mate and myself — drop the torpedo that hit the (USS) Helena, John Buchanan said, giving an invocation that was as much a recollection of his survival as a prayer. The surprise raid by waves of Japanese planes killed 2,335 American sailors, soldiers and Marines. Awakened by what might have been an explosion from the USS Arizona, Anderson ran out of his barracks in ...
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In real life, and in the movies, there's always a German officer who tells the newly captured airman, 'For you, the war is over.' A funny thing, but Bob Inghram and a bunch of other prisoners of war at Stalag Luft III didn't stop fighting, helping dig the tunnels Tom, Dick and Harry. Those men took the fight to the Germans from inside the wire and made history along the way. Here's a look at how the real 'Great Escape' happened. Happy Sunday!
Fighter pilot Bob Inghram didn’t know how low he could go after being shot down off the coast of France in a friendly-fire mishap, but the day would come when he slipped 25 feet underground at a German prisoner-of-war camp and helped dig a dark tunnel. A POW in Stalag Luft III, he was on the ground floor of a breakout that would become famous in the movie “The Great Escape.” [...] Inghram, now 95 and a retired Air Force lieutenant colonel, neve...
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Most experts have long felt it was vital to get the worst-injured patients to a hospital in an hour, but the military didn't have statistics to prove it. Thanks to Texas A&M lead researcher Russ Kotwal, a retired battalion surgeon with the 75th Ranger Regiment who helped immensely in explaining a complicated story, and Nicole Frugé, who did great work years ago when we were with the Alamo Dustoffs in Iraq.
Researchers scouring data from the long war in Afghanistan found that rushing wounded troops to hospitals in less than an hour, along with improved care on the battlefield and in medical evacuation helicopters, saved hundreds of lives. While trauma care experts have long considered it critical to get badly injured patients to emergency rooms within 60 minutes, the study proved it with detailed information on 4,542 casualties in Afghanistan. “Th...
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Every now and then a story is so strange it might be true. This one started with a command-directed investigation that was leaked to us and spelled out a series of shocking accusations substantiated by the investigator. We met with a one-star general and asked many, many follow-up questions over the span of two weeks. Our inquiries prompted the Air Force to order six commander's calls that found other DLI workers who echoed what was in the report. What you're about to read doesn't seem possible at one of the U.S. military's premier language schools, but there may be more.
An Air Force investigation last year agreed with complaints that a supervisor at the Defense Language Institute on Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland sexually harassed students and fellow instructors. The inquiry, which was not a criminal investigation, found that the supervisor, John A. Wilson, made students from foreign military forces sit in his lap, inappropriately touched staffers and once took a student into a closet and closed the door, acco...
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In more than 18 years on the beat, I've never seen anything like this - a lawyer sharing the Article 32 transcript. One reason is that most of these hearings produce summaries, not transcripts, but Eugene R. Fidell is giving us a glimpse into a process the military does its best to keep secret. His goal is to combat a series of Pentagon leaks and harsh comments from politicians and the public about his client, Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, by letting you see the evidence for yourself. Here's a look at how Fidell is shaping the battlefield, complete with the entire Article 32 transcript.
The lead attorney for Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, hammered by politicians, pundits and the public as a deserter and a traitor who placed fellow soldiers at risk, on Wednesday released a transcript of the recent hearing that could determine if he goes to trial. If the case goes to trial, the public relations campaign could also shape the battlefield of the courtroom, where combat veterans will decide if Bergdahl is guilty of either of the two charge...
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Now we know the 'why' part of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl's disappearance from Observation Post Mest in Afghanistan. His civilian attorney, Eugene Fidell, wouldn't call it a crazy scheme, but it was clearly intended to get attention and underscored testimony given by the two-star general who investigated the case. Home-schooled and living 'on the edge of the grid' in Idaho, Maj. Gen. Kenneth Dahl told the court, Bergdahl was bright, well read and highly principled, but 'had outsized impressions of his own capabilities.'
Maj. Gen. Kenneth Dahl, who led an investigation into the case, said Bergdahl believed that the intensive search resulting from his disappearance from Observation Post Mest would bring enough attention to him to allow him to talk to a general once he arrived at Forward Operating Base Sharana. The Army is seeking a court-martial of Bergdahl on charges of desertion with intent to shirk important or hazardous duty and misbehavior before the enemy b...
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