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Marcus Acosta
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"Computer programs have come to dominate stock-market trading over the past 20 years. The goal is speed, and it’s led to an arms race as companies develop ever-faster programs. High-speed trading came under public scrutiny following the “flash crash” of May 6, 2010, when a glitch erased 600 points from the Dow Jones industrial average in five minutes.
One of the latest weapons in the arms race is machine-readable news. The Thomson Reuters service, one of the more popular offerings, scans 50,000 news sources and 4 million social media sites for stories.
Brown says his programs take news articles and announcements and automatically flag answers to the essential questions — who, what, where, when and why. The answers are translated into a code that an investment firm’s trading program can understand and then sent to clients. All of that takes less than one-thousandth of a second.
It’s up to the investment fund to place a value on each word and rank established news outlets over other sources like blogs or social media websites, Brown said.
Tapping into the stream of comments on Twitter has become increasingly popular. Earlier this month, the Securities and Exchange Commission cleared companies to release key announcements on Twitter, Facebook and other social-media venues. Bloomberg also added Twitter to its terminal, a fixture on every big bank’s trading floor.
Regulators have been studying the problems posed by automatic computer trading for years. Last month, the SEC proposed tighter oversight of automatic trading. Stock exchanges would be required to test their trading systems routinely, and report to the SEC about problems that could damage trading, like hacking.
“The exchanges love speed,” said Bart Chilton, a member of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, a regulator that has been reviewing high-speed programs. “I’m not so sure that fast is always better.”
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Have him in circles
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Cabot Heritage Corporation's profile photo
Eric Stevenson's profile photo
ShitCtrl Del's profile photo
Edward Scott's profile photo
Infosecurity Magazine's profile photo
anwar avaloy's profile photo
Tina Chohan's profile photo
Susannah Goya-Pack's profile photo
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