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MSology
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MSology is a free website for people whose lives have been affected by multiple sclerosis.
MSology is a free website for people whose lives have been affected by multiple sclerosis.

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With the CUPID trial results in, it appears that there are mixed results for the use of marijuana as a treatment for people with progressive multiple sclerosis (#MS). Read more: http://msology.ca/mixed-results-for-marijuana 
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About 1 in 3 people with multiple sclerosis will experience difficulty swallowing at some point during their illness, according to a new analysis of studies published over the past 30 years. The researchers combined data from 15 surveys that involved over four thousand respondents. The overall prevalence of swallowing difficulties was 36%.

Read more at: http://msology.ca/difficulty-swallowing-is-common-in-multiple-sclerosis
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In our continued coverage of #ACTRIMS / #ECTRIMS we look at new data on #MS therapies administered by intravenous (into the vein) infusion.

Read more about these infusion drugs: http://msology.ca/actrimsectrims-2014-–-part-2
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Part 1 of our ACTRIMS / ECTRIMS 2014 coverage looks at the summary of new data on the three oral MS therapies currently available: Gilenya, Tecfidera and Aubagio.

The three themes at this year’s meeting were effectiveness, safety, and how one drug compares to another.

Read the summary: http://msology.ca/actrimsectrims-2014-–-part-1
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T’ai chi is often recommended for people with multiple sclerosis because of its potential physical and psychological benefits. The movements can build muscle strength, flexibility and stability and its meditative aspect can also help with mindfulness (living in the moment).

But is there any evidence that t’ai chi actually works?

Read more: http://msology.ca/the-benefits-of-t’ai-chi
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Beta-interferon drugs (Avonex, Betaseron/Extavia, Rebif) and Copaxone have been the mainstay of treatment for MS for over two decades. But is one type of treatment better than the other?

Read more about how Interferons compare with Copaxone: http://msology.ca/interferons-vs-copaxone-how-do-they-compare
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MSology will be attending this year’s largest event on MS Research; a joint meeting of ACTRIMS - ECTRIMS, which will be held September 10-13, 2014 in Boston.

A lot of new information will be presented. Help us pick the stories that are most important to you by completing our short survey:
http://msology.ca/msology-at-actrims-ectrims-–-boston-2014
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Promising new results have now been published for two monoclonal antibody (MAb) drugs in development that may provide additional options for people with multiple sclerosis over the next few years.

Read more about these two novel therapies: http://msology.ca/new-results-for-two-novel-therapies
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Most people with multiple sclerosis experience fatigue. It’s not the normal feeling of being tired, but more of a sick weariness that sucks the energy out of mind and body. About 40% overall, say that fatigue is their most disabling MS symptom.

Recent reviews of the many studies that have been done have offered some advice on what works best for fatigue.

Read more: http://msology.ca/dealing-with-ms-fatigue
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Over the past five years, a theory emerged that multiple sclerosis is caused by poor blood flow from the brain. This theory was called chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI), and it led to some centres offering surgery to dilate the veins to relieve the problem (with venous angioplasty).

The first well-controlled study of CCSVI has now investigated whether venous angioplasty is effective in MS. Read more: http://msology.ca/ccsvi-revisited
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