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The BCAT

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Cognitive Decline Tied to Brain's Insulin Resistance
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The BCAT

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Diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s disease at 49!
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The BCAT

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IMPROVING MEMORY THROUGH MUSIC
Recently, the PRI program, The World, featured a story about the phenomenon known as “earworm.” Earworm is a term referring to the experience of a song or melody that sticks in our heads. Researchers also refer to this as “stuck song syndrome.” Certainly most of us have had this experience when a song from our past is somehow triggered by a current experience, or a phrase (or a melody) of a song keeps popping into our consciousness. Most of the time, the musical memory is fleeting, but occasionally it appears to endure. The relationship between music and memory has a biological basis.
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The Alzheimer's Reading Room is a phenomenal resource for AD and dementia!
Bob DeMarco originally shared:
 
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The BCAT

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LifeHouse Buchanan Meadows, a 40-bed facility mostly for people with different levels of dementia, is training its staff in a Montessori-style approach to caring for patients, helping them find their level of success and steady routines.

"You use different techniques with the elderly, especially those with dementia," says executive director Kristin Baker. "The more you create a routine, the more apt they are to follow that routine. You do that daily."

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Alzheimer's Disease
Buchanan Meadows, at 809 Carrol St., was built in 1995, and has been part of California-based LifeHouse for more than five years. The secured facility has two connected 20-bed wings, one for people in early stages of dementia, one for those in later stages.

"We are doing full dementia care," Baker says. "We take care of some who don't have dementia." Occupancy is usually more than 90 percent, but recent losses have left 20 percent of the facility open.

The section for people in the earlier stages of dementia provides feeding, activities of daily living and help with physical needs. The side for people in later stages, including some who might wander or become agitated, provides more help with ordinary daily activities as well as needs such as feeding and transfer to a wheelchair.
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LIVING ALONE WITH ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE

According to the United Nations, residing within one’s home is a fundamental right. In articles 12 and 17 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the document states “No one shall be subjected to arbitrary interference with his privacy, family, home…..” (Article 12). “No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his property” (Article 17). Unfortunately, neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are not respectful of the Universal Declaration, creating ethical, societal and psychological dilemmas. As people age, they are more likely to live alone with severe impairment that will compromise safety and function. Most of us can appreciate the need to protect citizens from “arbitrary interference.” However, how one determines whether, when and how to intervene in order to protect vulnerable older adults is more complex.
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To continue Alzheimer's medications or to stop them? It can be an agonizing decision. New research indicates there may be some benefit to continuing the drugs into the severe stage, although it also suggests the benefits are modest.

A new study in the New England Journal of Medicine finds that patients with moderate or severe Alzheimer’s disease appeared to retain a small but significant benefit with the donepezil (Aricept) -- even as their condition still continued to worsen -- over those who added or switched to memantine (Namenda) or stopped taking any medication for Alzheimer’s.
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Recently a good deal of blog activity has centered on an article first published in August 2011, entitled: Google effects on memory: Cognitive consequences of having information at our fingertips, by Dr. Sparrow and her colleagues. The essential point Dr. Sparrow derives from her research is that having nearly instant access to information via the internet is changing how people make and store memories. Because one can instantly Google a question (e.g., who was the most valuable player in the 2011 Super Bowl? Who was the 16th President of the United States?), and get a quick answer, there is less of a need to actually remember the facts. Knowing where to find information is supplanting actually knowing the information. In other words, where is more important than what.Memory researchers refer to this as “transactive memory” – relying on other sources to store our information (so we don’t have to store it ourselves).
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Great post!
Gabriel Barliga originally shared:
 
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A cognitive screening tool, with an online scoring/interpretive program.
Introduction
The BCAT is a cognitive screening tool, complete with an online scoring and interpretive program. The BCAT:
  • can be completed in approximately 10-15 minutes;
  • can differentiate among Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), mild dementia, and moderate dementia;
  • contains strong verbal recall components;
  • has a complex executive function component; and,
  • predicts Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) (functional) performance.