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Adrienne St. Aubin
Worked at Google
Attended Cornell University
Lives in San Francisco, CA
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Adrienne St. Aubin

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People who know about plumbing: any idea what could cause a shower to suddenly stop working (and just dribble) when the apartment's other taps are working fine?
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This happened to us.  Our low-flow showerhead insert was clogged with gunk.  We took off the head, pried out the offender, and now have high-flow water.
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Adrienne St. Aubin

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Philip Glass on the difference between his previous and current work:
"I don’t mean to give you a Zen koan, but the work I did is the work I know, and the work I do is the work I don’t know. That’s why I can’t tell you, I don’t know what I’m doing. And it’s the not knowing that makes it interesting."

From a short but sweet piece on collaboration (even if you don't care for his music it's worth a read): http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/07/magazine/philip-glass-and-beck-discuss-collaborating-on-rework.html?_r=1&
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I'm a big fan of Glass and Beck and I yet had no idea they were collaborating. Thanks for sharing!
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Adrienne St. Aubin

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Michaelo Pollan on how California’s Proposition 37, which would require that genetically modified (G.M.) foods carry a label, has the potential to change the politics of food not just in California but nationally too: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/14/magazine/why-californias-proposition-37-should-matter-to-anyone-who-cares-about-food.html?ref=magazine&_r=0
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Adrienne St. Aubin

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Wow. Creepy.  I'm mostly amazed that someone had the stomach to pick it up.
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Adrienne St. Aubin

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New research suggests creativity is linked to longer life!

One possible reason creativity is protective of health is because it draws on a variety of neural networks within the brain, says study author Nicholas Turiano...“Individuals high in creativity maintain the integrity of their neural networks even into old age,” Turiano says—a notion supported by a January study from Yale University that correlated openness with the robustness of study subjects' white matter, which supports connections between neurons in different parts of the brain.

One might also guess it's also linked to happier life (would be interested if anyone has good data on that part).

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=open-mind-longer-life&fb_action_ids=10100705413781925&fb_action_types=og.likes&fb_source=timeline_og&action_object_map=%7B%2210100705413781925%22%3A10151013174165264%7D&action_type_map=%7B%2210100705413781925%22%3A%22og.likes%22%7D&action_ref_map=%5B%5D
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Adrienne St. Aubin

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What percentage of my positive feelings for my laptop come from the fact that it's a reliable source of warmth in an over-air-conditioned world? 

I wonder whether there are usage differences between warmer and cooler smartphones (with otherwise identical features and performance).  

It would also be interesting to see if there are gender differences in preferred device temperature. Do I prefer warmer devices because of a general human affinity for objects that feel more like living things, or because I am female and often feel cold?
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Why so quick to go to gender differences as the explanation?
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Adrienne St. Aubin

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Long but fascinating article about the lifestyle on a tiny Greek island whose population experiences outstanding longevity.

"If you pay careful attention to the way Ikarians have lived their lives, it appears that a dozen subtly powerful, mutually enhancing and pervasive factors are at work. It’s easy to get enough rest if no one else wakes up early and the village goes dead during afternoon naptime. It helps that the cheapest, most accessible foods are also the most healthful — and that your ancestors have spent centuries developing ways to make them taste good. It’s hard to get through the day in Ikaria without walking up 20 hills. You’re not likely to ever feel the existential pain of not belonging or even the simple stress of arriving late. Your community makes sure you’ll always have something to eat, but peer pressure will get you to contribute something too. You’re going to grow a garden, because that’s what your parents did, and that’s what your neighbors are doing. You’re less likely to be a victim of crime because everyone at once is a busybody and feels as if he’s being watched. At day’s end, you’ll share a cup of the seasonal herbal tea with your neighbor because that’s what he’s serving. Several glasses of wine may follow the tea, but you’ll drink them in the company of good friends. On Sunday, you’ll attend church, and you’ll fast before Orthodox feast days. Even if you’re antisocial, you’ll never be entirely alone. Your neighbors will cajole you out of your house for the village festival to eat your portion of goat meat."

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/28/magazine/the-island-where-people-forget-to-die.html?
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Whoa... Probably lots of wisdom in them there hills... 
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My thoughts on Estonia's recent announcement about teaching schoolkids computer science...
 
Google Public Policy & Government Relations Analyst +Adrienne St. Aubin writes about lessons the US and other countries can learn from Estonia's plans to teach kids how to write code starting in the first grade. 
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In which I make friends with a llama (a video from a few months ago).
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U have to watch them. They Will spit on you !!!!!!
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A mindblowing exchange during a taxi ride in SF this afternoon made me wonder if I might be the victim of an elaborate Uber marketing scheme designed to teach me that regular taxis are infernal places that exist in a strange realm beyond logic. 

Me: Could you turn on the AC please?
Cabbie: This is an old cab, there's no AC. You can roll down your window...and I suppose I can turn off the heater.
Me: YOU HAVE THE HEAT ON?! This is the hottest day of the year.
Cabbie (grumpily, while wearing hooded sweatshirt): I was cold.
*SILENCE FOR REST OF RIDE*

I was baffled by this conversation. Are there drugs that could cause someone to feel cold in 90-degree weather? Could this person be a sadist? Or have some kind of sweat fetish? 
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I think we're the victim of the same conspiracy (see my post from Sunday night).
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Estonia will soon have 100% of publicly educated students learning to write code starting in first grade.

The crucial difference between their approach and how we approach tech and education in the US is that they're emphasizing the creative aspect (making stuff) while our initiatives mostly focus on consumption (using tech in the classroom). Our kids are learning to be consumers of tech, while the Estonians are learning to be developers. 

My general admiration for Estonia and thoughts on tech education are topics for deeper posts in the future. But my brief Saturday morning reflection on this is that it's a great time to be a six-year old in Estonia, and the US needs to majorly up our game if we want to retain our reputation as a nation of builders and dreamers, and not just consumers. 

http://venturebeat.com/2012/09/04/estonia-code-academy/
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i would like to copy this image for my blog. Can i do it?
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In her circles
382 people
Have her in circles
9,846 people
Michael Cole's profile photo
Deniz Borisch's profile photo
Sodron Megenuk's profile photo
meneer Franssen's profile photo
tunde bamidele's profile photo
Angie “Black Queen” Harried-Finch's profile photo
Harshitha harshu's profile photo
Steven Sandner's profile photo
Mina  Hanna's profile photo
Work
Employment
  • Google
    2007 - 2014
  • John S. Knight Institute for Writing in the Disciplines, Cornell University
    2004 - 2006
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
San Francisco, CA
Previously
Heidelberg, Germany - Berlin, Germany - Ithaca, NY - Rhode Island / Massachusetts
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Introduction
interested in feelings, technology, design
Education
  • Cornell University
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Gender
Female