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Jim Hall
Works at Amec Environment and Infrastructure
Lives in Nashville TN
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Jim Hall

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Amazing. LG has built a TV that can be rolled up like a poster: http://on.mash.to/1y4ju6H
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cool..  can't for my "scroll" form factor device!
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Nintendo should just move to tablets for its simple games and port to the PS4 and Xbone.
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A great song and cause for my co-workers family.
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SciTech #ScienceSunday Digest 42 – 1st Dec 2013.
DNA crystals, soldering nanotubes, topological darkness, quantum biology, 2D tin, implanting genetic regulators, sensor polymers, pushing 3D printing, and others.

1. DNA-Mediated Crystal Formation.
Complementary DNA strands bound to nanoparticles (5 - 20nm in size) can cause highly disordered dispersions to condense into ordered arrays and finally form precise crystal structures as the temperature is slowly lowered http://phys.org/news/2013-11-slowly-cooled-dna-disordered-nanoparticles.html. The self-assembly process depends crucially on the ratio of DNA length to nanoparticle size, a relationship that the group has accurately determined. While the crystals are not quite atomically precise there certainly seems to be scope to achieve this, and the team predict creating extraordinarily large crystals in future. Computational modelling of such systems is also moving along swiftly http://phys.org/news/2013-11-scientists-genetic-algorithm-self-assembling-ssdna-grafted.html

2. Self-Soldering Nanotubes.
By exploiting the fact that arrays of carbon nanotubes get hot at the junction points where they cross-over you can now trigger a local chemical reaction at these hot spots in order to “solder” and permanently connect these junctions http://news.illinois.edu/news/13/1125nanosoldering_JosephLyding.html. The process is simple, easy to implement, and self-regulating and improves device (e.g. transistor) performance by an order of magnitude. The process can be used to produce transistor arrays that can be connected into circuits. 

3. Creating Topological Darkness with Metamaterials.
Newly developed bulk plasmonic metamaterials made of self-assembled arrays of nanoparticles comprising metallic cores surrounded by silica have been shown to exhibit the property of topological darkness http://www.nanowerk.com/spotlight/spotid=33424.php. Topological darkness means that these materials produce no reflected, scattered, or transmitted light - they are an almost perfect embodiment of black, which can have useful applications in devices like telescope and camera lenses, displays and optical sensors. Only 4 - 7 layers of nanoparticles are required to produce a topologically dark surface and the fabrication process can already cover large areas. 

4. The Case for Quantum Effects in Biology.
The warm, wet environments that characterise biological systems have been thought - for good reason - to be fundamentally hostile to any quantum effects. However, a new study on the large light-harvesting protein pigment used by green sulfur bacteria presents evidence that this fundamental mechanism of energy capture and conversion is dependent on quantum phenomena http://www.technologyreview.com/view/522016/quantum-light-harvesting-hints-at-entirely-new-form-of-computing/. Further, the transmission of light energy through the protein is almost 100% efficient and dependent on the interplay of both quantum and classical phenomena. The group wish to look for the same mechanism elsewhere (e.g. the brain) and also ponder computational devices based on these light-harvesting devices that could be 1000 times more efficient. Also, for the first time the complete crystal structure of the large multi-domain light-harvesting protein from cyanobacteria has been isolated and characterised http://phys.org/news/2013-11-scientists-photosynthetic-megacomplex.html

5. The Electrical Performance of 2D Sheets of Tin.
A new material known as stanene is comprised of 2D sheets of tin that incorporate fluorine atoms. Calculations reveal that stanene is a topological insulator, the edges of which should be able to conduct electricity with 100% efficiency at room temperature https://www6.slac.stanford.edu/news/2013-11-21-tin-super-material-stanene.aspx. 100% efficient electricity conduction at room temperature would be a boon for most electrical applications, minimising heat and thermal losses. While interfaces with other circuit elements would still entail losses, there appears to be some confusion differentiating this material from superconductors. I’d certainly like to see them make a sample and I wonder if it was made into a ring whether perpetual currents could be established in the edges. Also, electrons travelling in a certain direction appear to be confined to a certain spin.

6. Implantable Genetic Weight-Loss Circuit.
A genetic regulatory circuit implanted into human cells, which were loaded into tiny capsules, that were subsequently implanted into obese mice . . . helped the mice lose weight https://www.ethz.ch/en/news-and-events/media-information/media-releases/2013/11/implantable-slimming-aid.html. When the mice were fed fatty food the cells in the implant detected the increased fat content in the blood, causing the engineered regulatory circuit to produce a signal that suppresses the animal’s appetite. Despite having as much high-fat food as possible the animals ate less and lost weight. While still a while away from human testing and treatment of obesity this is yet another promising development for implantable tools that utilise engineered cells.

7. Sensor Platform Combines Polymers and Nanotubes.
A new sensor platform combines amphiphilic polymers and carbon nanotubes http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2013/creating-synthetic-antibodies-1124.html. The amphiphilic polymers are designed to incorporate hydrophobic segments on either end of a hydrophilic middle segment; the ends bind to the nanotubes and leave the central portion to extend in a loop away from the tube. Custom designing the polymer sequence means the loops can be engineered to detect and bind a huge array of specific molecules, almost like synthetic antibodies. The proof-of-concept study created molecular recognition sites for riboflavin, estrogen, and a thyroid hormone. Being cheap and easy to create there are many applications that could arise from this.

8. Pushing 3D Printing Forward.
The number of inks available for 3D printing electronic components continues to grow, with research groups now able to print lithium-ion batteries and other electronic components such as ellectrodes, wires, and antennas with greater ease than before http://www.technologyreview.com/demo/521956/printing-batteries/, with the process working on better tools and print-heads at room temperature and using materials that are sensitive to pressure. Meanwhile great strides are being made to 3D print realistic and natural-looking synthetic skin that can match a patients age, gender, and ethnic group http://phys.org/news/2013-11-natural-looking-3d-printed-skin.html.

9. Exploiting Surface Biomimicry to Kill Bacteria.
An analysis of the surfaces of cicada and dragonfly wings revealed nanopillar structures that were particularly potent killers of bacteria. Such surface structures are similar to those exhibited by black silicon and further analysis of this material revealed that it too was incredibly effective at ripping open the cell walls of bacteria http://phys.org/news/2013-11-germ-killing-nanosurface-front-hygiene.html. While such surfaces feel smooth to the touch they were shown to be effective against gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria as well as the spores they produce. 

10. Gearing-Up Fleets of Nanosatellites.
The development and launch of nanosatellites is really starting to ramp up and seems to be ever more accessible to those who wish to develop applications for devices in Earth orbit. The company Planet Labs launched its two latest satellites this week and will follow this up with by launching a constellation of 28 nanosatellites by the end of the year http://nextbigfuture.com/2013/11/flock-of-28-nanosatellites-is-targeted.html. Would anyone like to buy an eye in space? 

The weekly SciTech Digests are also available as a Google Currents Edition here: 
https://www.google.com/producer/editions/CAow4-hB/scitech_digest 

+ScienceSunday, with your hosts +Buddhini Samarasinghe, +Rajini Rao, +Chad Haney, +Allison Sekuler, and +Robby Bowles!

+STEM on Google+ Community
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This is a good outcome, these devices are great but they need oversight.  The police know they want to track these guys and a judge would likely agree.  I think that people being aware of the seriousness of this use of tracking will but a chill on private use as well.
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This is a great job at partially correcting a terrible tragedy.  And we learned a new word; parbuckling.
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Nerd requirement; watch Wils' show.
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Shan Shui City fusiona la naturaleza con la arquitectura  http://www.tecnoneo.com/2014/01/shan-shui-city-fusiona-la-naturaleza.html#more
 ·  Translate
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This man needs a hero's welcome not a prison cell.
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This is good for the satellite companies. I wonder what those communities that made, or wanted to make, it illegal to capture aerial photography are going to think about this.
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I wonder what will happen when ATT alert web security figures out how to block g+ like it does Facebook for it corporate clients?
 
Google+ Surpasses 1 Billion Users!
Look out Facebook, here we come!

Yesterday it was revealed that Google+ has quietly surpassed the 1 Billion user mark. This is very exciting news-- how could I not create an #infographic  for that?

I also shared my thoughts on the numbers here: http://dustn.ws/15UmW7Z

These numbers only represent the number of registered users, as opposed to the number of active users. While the real test of a successful social network is in it's active user numbers, the registered user numbers are nothing to take lightly.

What are your thoughts on this new data?

#socialmedia   #evang+   #googleplus   #twitter   #instagram   #pinterest  
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Orange County, CA Offers its Parcel Base for Free .... kinda, sorta
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Have him in circles
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