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David Eldridge
Attends Personal Learning
Lives in Topeka, KS
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David Eldridge

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David Eldridge

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The only thing ridin' dirty in this video is whatever's in your nose. :)
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David Eldridge

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I am excited to see our Governor (Sam Brownback, Rep., Kans.) taking care after the Constitution and our rights to life, liberty and property. I hope that this stands for the whole of the Constitution and that he stands against the modern misinterpretation of the Supremacy Clause. The Federal Government's supremacy has force in those cases where they are enforcing the constitution itself "and laws of the United States made in pursuance thereof" not every law that they create without regard to their Constitutionality. Or Else why were the 9th and 10th Amendments written? If the Supremacy Clause declares all federal laws as supreme those two amendments are a vapor.
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I'll make a brief response or two:

I don't “delete any and all”. I did in your case, after a previous private request (https://plus.google.com/u/0/114532675570920907037/posts/3L8ZUbpmsD3) delete comments from you. Google+ is not a forum that is intended to encourage anonymous confrontation.

I do remember that you said some things about Ron Paul that got me thinking, and less fervent about my position on him. I did not ultimately vote for him in the primaries (caucuses in Kansas that year), and because of his position on homosexuality (or what I perceive it to be), I ultimately discouraged others from voting for him.

On the issue of rights, the 9th and 10th amendments explicitly show that the Bill of Rights are inclusive and not exhaustive. Consider the amendments:

IX: The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people. (… and …) X: The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.

We can clearly see that those are not intended to be all-encompassing.

Additionally, what does the statement "The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people" mean if the powers are elastically bound by the will of the courts of the agent's own choosing? If that is a tautology, then it doesn't belong in the Bill of Rights. If it is not, then it is a constraint, a limitation. If it is a tautological bound that ebbs and flows as our nine black-robed deities determine, then there is no right outside of those expounded earlier in the Bill of Rights, because the rest of them are the central government's as they are not fixed by anything but this fluid idea of constitutionality which only flows and never ebbs (which is hyperbole of the most milquetoast order).

I don't know that your appeal to the work on the banks of the United States proves so much as you say. If you use later actions of signers of the Constitution to prove what they thought (or professed to think) at the time of the signing, then Jefferson and Madison (signers of the Kentucky Resolution of 1798) might as well have been Federalists. Madison was clearly a nationalist (i.e. Federalist). Jefferson's Louisiana Purchase and trade embargoes prove that he too was a nationalist. But, I think that at the time of the signing even Hamilton would have said that a national (central) bank was a bridge too far, ostensibly based upon their construction of the Constitution. If they would have told the people of those recently-emancipated states that the newly-formed federal government was just as powerful as their former absolutist monarchies, how do you imagine that most of the citizens of those states would have taken that?

Consider, the drafters were initially commissioned—not to draft a Constitution so-called, but—Articles of Confederation. The powers of the federal confederate government were always sold to the people as being weak, and their taxing powers nearly absent. Later actions of these men are not necessarily good indicators of their professed intentions at the point of their signing.

I think that the point that you make about the Bible and the Constitution is fair insofar as you mistook my point: they are not comparable. I was talking about the over-estimation of the interpretation of a work by favored priestly types (whether they be pastors or Supreme Court justices). If the states created the institution of the federal government as their agent, then they (principles) are the arbiters of the nature and scope of their agent's purpose, duties and authority. Not the other way around. We bought a watch dog, and now we are duty bound to coddle it, when this mangy, rabid beast should be put down.

The point that you make about Jefferson is about as useful as making the point that the infallible Word of God was (in God's own impeccable, foreordaining providence) in large part gathered by Erasmus of Rotterdam. He is thought to have been a Sodomite, known to have been a bastard, and never left the Catholic church in the time of Reformation. Moses murdered a man. King David did much more. Paul, killed (or aided in the killing of) many. I don't deny that Jefferson was an unbeliever (a Deist), and likely a philanderer, or that he was inconsistent in his political views (as I showed some of his tendency toward centralized powers above).

Let God be true and every man a liar. Jefferson was but a man, unseemly at points (even as you and I). Though in his death, he seems never to have repented of his unbelief. But who among the founders did better. I am not arguing scripturally for our form of government. I am arguing only for the consistent application of it to and among our own citizens.

Now, since you continue to post anonymously, I will delete your future points. But since the points you make seem valuable, I will leave what you have written thus far alone. If you would like to post more, please answer my aside post: https://plus.google.com/u/0/114532675570920907037/posts/3L8ZUbpmsD3 .) And I will keep that information to myself, and plan to leave you to post as you would like.
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David Eldridge

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There is mounting evidence that Americans are more afraid of government than terrorists. Polls from right- and left-leaning news outfits, polling organizations, and pundits indicate increasing fear of our surveillance state.
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Would there ever come a point when we would step back and say, maybe the reason that they hate us stems from the fact that we are killing their innocents? Is it possible that we (with our 'preemptive war' policy have struck the first blow to our own destruction)? Would we hate what we do in the gulf and Pakistan more if we could see what it looked like more (as we did in Boston)? I think that if we would stop and empathize with those that have lost their innocent loved ones, we would potentially stop much unnecessary bloodshed on our own soil. Consider, this one day in Boston was like so many days in Pakistan, or many places in the Gulf.
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From http://SitesNotSpies.org: What's wrong with CISPA? (in as few words as possible)

As it's written, CISPA won't protect us from cyber threats, but it will violate our 4th Amendment right to privacy.
• It lets the government spy on you without a warrant: <http://goo.gl/tvBTv>.
• It makes it so you can’t even find out about it after the fact: <http://goo.gl/TW6KM>.
• It makes it so companies can’t be sued when they do illegal things with your data: <http://goo.gl/j5kEL>.
• It allows corporations to cyber-attack each other and individuals outside of the law: <http://goo.gl/sq6zr>.
• It makes every privacy policy on the web a moot point, and violates the 4th amendment: <http://goo.gl/N4SGM>.

Please consider contacting your senators, the house has already sold you down the river.
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Question: there is a command in *nix that allows you to ping with a single response, rather than a continual string of responses. Anyone know what that is?
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Daniel Michael's profile photoJason Divis's profile photoPeter Carrero's profile photoDavid Eldridge's profile photo
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+Jason Divis I remember the first time I ran a ping on my Mac, and I didn't know to expect anything different. It just kept running. I think it took me a little bit to pull that ctrl+C interrupt out of the cobwebs of my DOS thinking. Fortunately, that worked as expected. :) … (Sorry for the late response.)
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I think that Susan Sarandon honestly believed that Obama would bring transparency. And when she found that it wasn't so, she admitted as much. She is very involved in releasing a movie at the Tribeca Film Festival called Silenced, and it is quite critical of Obama's treatment of whistleblowers: particularly as its exceeding frequency is contrasted historically against other president’s administrations. https://youtu.be/4zsAADM51bE
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This is an explanation of the my new cover/banner image on Google+
These are numbers of folks that are killed annually by Americans:

150 in mass shootings
This has been pretty constant for close to (or over) 30 years running now.

10,000 - make that 12,000 are gun deaths
This does not include suicides, but does include all 'justifiable' homicide like any police-initiated shooting and self-defense. When including suicide, it is more like 32,000. It should probably be more like 12,000 when excluding suicide.

100,000 are casualties in the "War on Terror"
This is based on the average of the deaths that have occurred in the Middle East and Pakistan since the Second Gulf War started. That number is measured to be between one and three million depending on things like counting missing people as dead, counting deaths related to destroyed infrastructure (power outages, destroyed hospitals, etc.), fratricide, collateral damage, military dead, etc. It includes Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya, and Pakistan. If you take the lowest estimate and average it out over 10 years, it comes to roughly 100,000/year.

1,200,000 are abortions
I gather that this number is generally-agreed upon. The reason that I am so guarded is that it seems like a number that big would be embarrassing to the left, and they would dispute it (in the same way that I am surprised that Madeleine Albright never disagreed that 500,000 children died as a result of the "Oil for Food" program).
1.2M is a recent decrease from the middle of the last decade where it was estimated that 1.5M were aborted annually. I have a few times recently heard that decrease attributed to the morning after pill (and so-called emergency contraception), which is arguably still abortion.

It is convenient to love those cute little seven-year-olds that died in Newtown, while neglecting the ones that never see the light of day. But it is still murder. The biggest difference is that the perpetrators kill far more, they use medication and medical implements, and they have government permission.
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Back in 2005, Jerry Falwell said that Hurricane Katrina was God's judgment for our wickedness. Someone in my family rightly pointed out that it would be presumption to say that you know such a thing. So, let's assume that it's not God's judgment.

What would he judge us for? How long would it take before he would do it? How bad would it have to be? And how would we know why he did it?

And is it reasonable to assume that Hurricane Katrina, 9/11, Sandy Hook, the Boston Bombing, the OKC Bombing, etc. are all the outpouring of his kindness upon us for our faithfulness to keep his commandments?

I am not necessarily agreeing with Falwell. I am merely asking, would God ever judge us? If so why? If not, why not? And how is that fair to Sodom, Babylon, Rome, and so many others?
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Over the past 20 years we have remained constant in the number that have died in mass shootings in the U.S. (around 150). And we have had a history of school shootings that goes back around 200 years. But if you measure mass shootings statistically, they make up ½ of a percent of a percent of a percent of the U.S. population annually, while deaths by abortion measure at nearly ½ of a percent (1.2 million and around 1.5 if you count RU-486). We could save as many children in one year of abolishing abortion (and the “morning after” pill) as in 10,000 years without mass shootings.
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I saw something a few days ago that broke down your likelihood of being attacked by a terrorist compared to other things, like being struck by lightning, etc. It said that you are eight times more likely to be killed by a police officer than a terrorist <http://j.mp/ZiSiOT>. Wow!
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I am happy to say that CISPA is dead as it stands:
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One Web Guy That Thinks Too Much…
Introduction
I am a web developer in northeast Kansas.

I moved to Topeka to be closer to my church, which I began attending while at Fort Riley to the west. I really enjoy living here.

(Please note the following about pictures: I post images, and maintain no rights over the images that I created: both photo and art. I only ask that you do not misrepresent authorship or intent. I don't pretend to give license to images created by others: I may not believe in IP, but I am not willing to die on that hill.)
Bragging rights
I can kill a comment thread like nobody's business. :(
Education
  • Personal Learning
    History, Economics, Technology, etc., 2007 - present
    I am a student of the human condition (with its brilliance and depravity), history, economics, technology, and law.
  • Friends University
    Business Administration (BBA), 2007 - 2009
  • Washburn University
    Web Development (BIS), 2006 - 2007
  • Allen County Community College
    General Studies, 2008 - 2009
  • Barton County Community College
    General Studies, 2001 - 2001
Basic Information
Gender
Male
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Married
Other names
Dave, dw, Wally, Bert, Peanut
Work
Occupation
Front-end (Web) Developer
Skills
CSS, HTML, PHP, JavaScript, OS X, Regex, Repurposing text, Googling, and on, and on
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Topeka, KS
Previously
Bitburg, Germany - Denver, Colorado - Austin, Texas - Palmer, Alaska - Huber Heights, Ohio - Wright Patterson AFB, Ohio - Aurora, Colorado - San Antonio, Texas - Fort Riley, Kansas - Junction City, Kansas - Kladanj, Bosnia-Herzegovina
I was having problems with my Mac (disk I/O failures), and brought it in and spoke with them. They gave me good advice which helped me to determine a good course of action, and I was able to take care of it myself. I didn't even have to leave it in the shop.
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It has been a year and a half since I visited, and the grass-fed steak that I had there is still quite memorable. I can't believe that I haven't made a special trip out there since then.
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