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T Kurtovic
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T Kurtovic

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#onthisday   in 1833, the Belgian Symbolist artist Félicien Rops was born in Namur.
 
“Whenever the pain becomes too much, I saddle my horse and disappear in the forest... silent as desire, silent as myself. For I am not the cheerful gentleman with whom you are acquainted. Within this body is imprisoned a soul like a half-starved tiger in an iron cage, bellowing out its dreadful passions. All men seem mean and pretty to me, ingloriously lewd, travelling salesmen with their second-rate eroticism!” (Félicien Rops)

Paris obviously was sending out something along the lines of Bohemian shockwaves during the second half of the 19th century. Or something along these lines, since most aspiring artists coming to the capital of arts seem to have thrown the remnants of their provincial provenances’ bourgeois morals overboard and lost themselves in alternative lifestyles. Under these auspices, Belgium spawned quite a few remarkable artists and Parisian expats, writers like Maeterlinck and Verhaeren and painters like James Ensor and Fernand Khnopff and Félicien Rops. All part of the Symbolist movement or its varieties like the Decadents, the Belgian artists were obsessed with the undercurrents of the soul, myth and legends and enlarged upon the more Gothic sujets the Romantics had revealed a few decades before. And usually added an overtly sensual note to the potpourri, often bordering or encompassing pornography, as it was the case with Félicien Rops.
 
Ironically enough, censorship in Napoleon III’s Second Empire ensured that many of the works of the poètes maudits had to be published abroad, with Baudelaire leading the way.  At his publisher’s in Brussels, the aging Baudelaire met the aspiring illustrator Félicien Rops, Rops, quite impressed by the poet, agreed to design the frontispiece for “Les Épaves” and a lasting influence was established. The Belgian artist moved to Paris and became a decadent. Living in a ménage à trois with two sisters, meeting in the regular spots with the usual suspects, d’Aurevilly, Mallarmé, Verlaine and Péladan, illustrating their works and climaxing their thoughts to a visual erotic Fin de Siècle satanism mélange to a point, where seriousness was long since overstepped and resulted in pure irony. Thus, the fantasies of the symbolists and decadents, often at least as schoolboy-like and cliché-ridden as those of the academic artists the bohemians despised, experienced a ribald and refreshing twist in perception that keeps Rops’ illustrations as fresh, purple and scandalizing as it was 150 years ago.

Depicted below is Félicien Rops’ racy symbolist painting “Pornocrates” (1878).

And more on:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F%C3%A9licien_Rops

#art   #arthistory   #symbolism   #europeanart  
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T Kurtovic

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eccentricity
 
Watch "Glenn Gould: Off & On the Record," 2 Gorgeous Short Films About the Life & Music of the Eccentric Musician 
Canadian pianist Glenn Gould was one of those child prodigies whose spectacular talents were matched by some serious eccentricities.
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pablo nerruda
 
Listen to Pablo Neruda’s Historic First Reading in the US. Recorded in New York in 1966. http://cultr.me/1s35Hhd  
Few public figures of the 20th century are as dear to the hearts and minds of Latin America as Chilean poet Neftali Ricardo Reyes Basoalto -- AKA Pablo Neruda. He became famous for his writing before he was 20 years old and he won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1971.
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Anti-Inflammatory Remedies For Pain: Used Topically And Orally (Video) http://b4in.org/f3Mn

Coffee:  Caffeine stresses out the adrenal glands, round disk shaped organs only a few inches across which sit atop each kidney on the posterior side of the body which is, you guessed it, right in the area of the lower back.

Just a single caffeinated drink stimulates your adrenal glands which translates into the energy boost that is the primary reason folks consume caffeine in the first place.

Nightshade vegetables:  Nightshade vegetables like tomatoes, potatoes, and eggplant may trigger arthritis and pain conditions in some people.
 
Here’s the goodies:
 
- Eat fresh pineapples daily! Pineapples contain Bromelain (pineapple enzyme) and is a very powerful anti-inflammatory. I try to drink fresh pineapple juice every morning. Pineapples have become one of my favorite fruits of all time.
 
- Take the herb valerian which helps with muscle spasms and relaxation. I use this and it really works!
 
Hypericum also known as St. Johns Wort not only makes you happier and treats deppression but it also helps with pain relief.
 
Jamaican dogwood is great for people who have migraines and insomnia. It’s not only an anti-inflammatory but also an antispasmodic and can be used along with other herbs to treat the musculoskeletal pain of arthritis and rheumatism.
 
- To make natural aspirin tablets can be made with willow bark and meadowsweet...you will for sweet after taking this remedy!
 
- Taking ginger, cayenne, horseradish, lobelia, and crampbark internally and externally by rubbing it on the painful area can help tremendously!

More http://b4in.org/f3Mn
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eat your spinach popeye
 
How tall we grow reflects how well we grew up. http://theatln.tc/1l8qRUG
Men grew four inches in 100 years, mostly in the early 20th century. How they managed that speaks to how our childhood living conditions influence our stature.
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comic irony in nature
 
Why were a butterfly and a bee drinking tears from a crocodile's eyes? Find out about the phenomenon known as "tear-feeding."
Moths, butterflies, and bees are known to feed on mammal tears, but the phenomenon remains poorly understood.
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beautiful
 
Download 55 Free Online Literature Courses: From Dante and Milton to Kerouac and Tolkien http://goo.gl/GNGebc
Here at Open Culture, we don't just feature education in your recommended daily servings of culturally wide-ranging video, audio, text, and image — we also feature it in a form that goes deep: whole courses you can download to your computer or mobile device of choice and experience at your own pace.
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afrique
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An alternative path to prosperity. http://buff.ly/1qovMCR
After days of coordinating with me over patchy cell phone connections, Hao Shengli arrived in Mozambique's capital city of Maputo. He'd come to load up on supplies and to collect me for the long ride back to the farmland he owned in a remote southern part of the country. When his white Toyota pickup stopped...
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A forgotten Belgian genius dreamed up the internet over 100 years ago
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#onthisday   in 1291, the last crusader stronghold of the Levant, St John d’Acre, present-day Acre in northern Israel, was captured by the Mamluks, ending the Age of Crusades in the Near East.

“With the conquests the whole of Palestine was now in Muslim hands, a result that no one would have dared to hope for or to desire. Thus the whole of Syria and the coastal zones were purified of the Franks, who had once been on the point of conquering Egypt and subduing Damascus and other cities. Praise be to God!” (Abu'l-Fida, “The Concise History of Humanity“ 1329) 

The disaster of St Louis’ seventh crusade that foundered in Egypt and ended in 1254 with the King of France having to leave the Levant almost bankrupt after the payment of a king’s ransom to the new Mamluk rulers, spending more money to strengthen the defences of the few remaining Frankish cities and castles in Syria and the failure to establish an effective alliance with the Mongols pushing in from the North, the last hours of the Kingdom of Jerusalem had come. The Mameuk Sultan Baibars defeated the Ilkhanate Mongols at Ain Jalut in 1260 and the Franks in several battles, captured Antioch in 1268 along with several stongholds, among them the famous Krak des Chevaliers, and played a pivotal role in the conversion of the Ilkhanate to Islam. His successors continued his mopping-up actions against the Franks and when Tripoli fell in 1289, St John d’Acre was the last place in Christian hands.

The call for help towards Europe did not go completely unheeded. A few shiploads of mob from Tuscany and Lombardy came to Acre during the summer of 1290 and were a bit surprised to find thriving Muslim and Jewish communities in the place, a feature that had become quite common in all the lost cities of the Outremer, and, first things first, massacred them while the Frankish lords of the place along with the military orders watched open-mouthed. In the meanwhile, the Mamluk Sultan Qalawun had mustered a huge army in the region, allegedly over a hundred thousand men, and moved in for the kill but died in Cairo before he could take command, giving the Franks a last bit of breathing space and the possibility to evacuate at least some of the 40.000 surviving civilians of Acre to Cyprus. In April 1291 the siege began under the command of Qalawun’s son al-Ashraf Khalil.

It was a small comfort to the Frankish defenders of Acre that the Mamluks did not fight a religious war against them but basically tried to secure a firm frontier against the Mongols and Turks in Asia Minor and couldn’t afford the hostile Franks as a thorn in their side in the Levant. Not that they liked each other very much, but the Mamluks had no scruples whatsoever to establish firm trade relations with the West. However, after six weeks of siege, in the dawn of May 18th, al-Ashraf Khalil gave the signal for a full-scale attack on Acre. After a desperate defence, all of the town was in Mamluk hands by nightfall, except the headquarter of the Knights Templar that held out until May 28th. But the Age of Crusades ended on that day and the final Mamluk conquest of the Levant left the place a thinly populated semidesert until the 19th century.

Depicted below is a Romantic imagination of the Hospitalier Master Mathieu de Clermont defending the walls of Acre by Dominique Papety (circa 1840).

And more on:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siege_of_Acre_(1291)

#history   #medievalhistory   #ageofcrusades   #militaryhistory   #europeanhistory  
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