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Valley Automotive
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Now is a good time to think about snow tires, windshield wipers, and maybe even a new battery. Stop in and talk to Valley Auto about all your Auto needs.

Snowfall Outlook Through Monday While it is too far out in time to specify exact forecast snowfall totals, areas in the purple and pink contours have a higher chance at heavy snowfall. The higher totals in the Great Lakes snowbelts are also from a lake-effect event later this week.  Weather.Com


Snow is coming! Are you ready?
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Holidays Holiday Hours 2016
Closed thanksgiving Nov 24 and Friday, Nov 25

Close at 3pm on Friday, December 23rd

Closed December 26th

Closed January 2nd

Wishing all our customers Happy Holiday Season

Wishing all our customers Happy Holiday Season!
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Winter is coming we can help you get ready, it is a good time to replace your wiper blades and tires.
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We repair and install Jasper Diesel Engines in Chester, NJ
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Top 10 Spring Car Care Tips

Our spring car care tips will help you stay safe and keep your vehicle running smooth.
1- Batteries, Plugs & Wires: All of these components give the spark to your your vehicle and they work extra hard when it’s cold. Winter stress can compromise their performance up to 60 percent. Test and replace old or weak batteries, plugs and wires, especially those more than three years old. It will certainly be cheaper than a tow and replacement down the road.
2-Tire Pressure: Cold weather can reduce tire pressure, so make sure all tires, including the spare, are properly inflated and balanced. You can check the inside of your car door to find out what the proper air pressure should be.
3-Belts and hoses: Inspect and replace worn or cracked belts, as well as hoses that are blistered, brittle or too soft. Belts and hoses older than five years, even if they look intact, might need to be replaced.
4-Brakes: After a season of snow and ice it is advisable to inspect the brake system, including lines, hoses, parking brake and brake fluid for proper level. We rely on our brakes and something as simple as a brake pad change can help put an end to any worrys about brake safety.
5-Suspension & Wheel Alignment: Deep potholes aren’t friendly to shocks and struts. An inspection to determine wear or leaks can alleviate bigger issues down the road. Also having your wheels properly aligned after a season of tough conditions can help keep you on the road in a safe direction.
6-Fluid Levels: There are lots of things to check but don’t skip over any of them: engine oil, transmission fluid, brake fluid, antifreeze/coolant and, yes, even windshield washer fluid. Commonly a brake fluid flush can get your sluggish brakes working as good as new and because this is recommended once a year there is no better time to get it done.
7-Engine Air filter: Changing out the engine air filter is a quick job that can be done during any oil, brake or transmission fluid change.
8- Windshield Wipers: Check them for wear and cracks and replace them if necessary, think about doing this each spring and fall.
9-Clean the interior: It’s easy to use your car or truck as a storage area for all kinds of things (including useless junk and garbage), especially in the cold months when you don’t feel like cleaning your car in the freezing cold. Take the time to declutter your car, losing the extra weight can significantly increase your gas mileage too. It’s worth it.
10-Clean the exterior: Take special care to address the undercarriage where road salt can eat away or corrode the metal. A thorough cleaning at a car wash should do the trick.

Get your car ready for spring
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100,000 mile maintenance
The average family drives about 12-15k miles which means that it is around the 7-10 year mark and time for a little more than your average overhaul. If you keep up with seasonal maintenance and the major maintenance benchmarks then there is no reason that you can’t see your vehicles odometer go to 200,000 miles and beyond.
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Tips for driving in the snow:

Accelerate and decelerate slowly. Applying the gas slowly to accelerate is the best method for regaining traction and avoiding skids. Don’t try to get moving in a hurry. And take time to slow down for a stoplight. Remember: It takes longer to slow down on icy roads.
Drive slowly. Everything takes longer on snow-covered roads. Accelerating, stopping, turning – nothing happens as quickly as on dry pavement. Give yourself time to maneuver by driving slowly.
The normal dry pavement following distance of three to four seconds should be increased to eight to ten seconds. This increased margin of safety will provide the longer distance needed if you have to stop.
Know your brakes. Whether you have antilock brakes or not, the best way to stop is threshold breaking. Keep the heel of your foot on the floor and use the ball of your foot to apply firm, steady pressure on the brake pedal.
Don’t stop if you can avoid it. There’s a big difference in the amount of inertia it takes to start moving from a full stop versus how much it takes to get moving while still rolling. If you can slow down enough to keep rolling until a traffic light changes, do it.
Don’t power up hills. Applying extra gas on snow-covered roads just starts your wheels spinning. Try to get a little inertia going before you reach the hill and let that inertia carry you to the top. As you reach the crest of the hill, reduce your speed and proceed down hill as slowly as possible.
Don’t stop going up a hill. There’s nothing worse than trying to get moving up a hill on an icy road. Get some inertia going on a flat roadway before you take on the hill.
Stay home. If you really don’t have to go out, don’t. Even if you can drive well in the snow, not everyone else can. Don’t tempt fate: If you don’t have somewhere you have to be, watch the snow from indoors.

Visit AAA’s YouTube page for more videos on winter driving tips.

Prepare you and your car for snow.
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Here are some quick facts and tips that should put the idling question to rest:
1. Driving Warms the Car Faster than Idling.
If your concern is not the health of the car, but simply your own creature comforts, energy experty Bob Aldrich points out that "idling is not actually an effective way to warm up a car - it warms up faster if you just drive it." The coming electric cars, such as the Nissan Leaf, will incorporate a wonderful feature that allows the owner to use a cellphone to tell the car (which is plugged into the grid) to pre-warm or pre-cool the interior. No idling necessary.
2. Ten Seconds Is All You Need.
The Environmental Defense Fund, which produced the Idling Gets You Nowhere campaign, advises motorists to turn off their ignition if they're sitting stopped for more than 10 seconds. "After about ten seconds, you waste more money running the engine than restarting it, said Andy Darrell, deputy director of the EDF Energy Program. "Switch the car off at the curb and you'll be leaving money in your wallet and protecting the air in your community."
3. Idling Hurts the Car.
According to the Hinkle Charitable Foundation's Anti-Idling Primer, idling forces an engine "to operate in a very inefficient and gasoline-rich mode that, over time, can degrade the engine's performance and reduce mileage."
4. Idling Costs Money.
Over a year of five minutes of daily idling (which causes incomplete combustion of fuel), the "Anti-Idling Primer" estimates that the operator of a V-8-engined car will waste 20 gallons of gasoline, which not only produces 440 pounds of carbon dioxide but costs at least $60.
5. Idling in the Garage Can Kill You.
Idling a car in a garage, even with the door open, is dangerous and exposes the driver to carbon monoxide and other noxious gases. If the garage is attached, those fumes can also enter the house.
6. Block Heaters Beat Remote Starters.
Lori Strothard of the Waterloo Citizens Vehicle Idling Reduction Task Force says, "Remote starters can too easily cause people to warm up their cars for five to 15 minutes, which is generally unnecessary. A block heater, which is designed to heat the engine and can cost under $30, on a timer set to start one to two hours before driving does the trick in very cold climates.
7. Quick Errands Aren't Quick Enough.
Natural Resources Canada points out that "quick errand" idling is another way to waste gas and pollute both your town and the planet. "Leaving your engine running is hard on your pocketbook, produces greenhouse gas emissions and is an invitation to car thieves," the agency says.
8. Idling is Bad for Your Health (and Your Neighbor's Health).
According to Minneapolis' anti-idling ordinance, "Exhaust is hazardous to human health, especially children's; studies have linked air pollution to increased rates of cancer, heart and lung disease, asthma and allergies." Isabelle Silverman, who runs EDF's anti-idling campaign, says that car idling "is the second-hand smoking of the outdoors. One of the problems is that cars idle close to the curb, where pedestrians are walking. And when you have a child in a stroller, they are particularly close to the tailpipe. Studies show that children's IQ levels are lower when they live near major roads with lots of traffic."
Alex Scaperotta, who created an anti-idling campaign with a classmate when he was in fifth grade in Wilton, Connecticut, came up with a slogan that was used on bumper stickers and websites: "If you're stopped for more than 10, turn it off and on again." Sounds like good advice.
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