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David Nestler
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It is time for American to elect a third-party candidate! Join our fight at www.GaryJohnson2016.com!
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How cool is this.
Facebook Twitter Google+ Reddit StumbleUponLooking deep into the Carina Nebula, the Hubble Space Telescope caught a glimpse of over 2,000 bright young stars in Trumpler 14. The stars seen sparkling in the new image are some of the brightest found in the Milky Way galaxy. Trumpler 14 is the largest and youngest star cluster in the Carina
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An image of the Rosette Nebula, one of the nebulae featured in the new book "The Armchair Astronomer — Vol. 1 (Nebulae)." 
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Unexpected Changes of Bright Spots on Ceres Discovered | ESO
Image Description: This artist’s impression is based on a detailed map of the surface compiled from images taken from NASA’s Dawn spacecraft in orbit around the dwarf planet Ceres. It shows the very bright patches of material in the crater Occator and elsewhere. New observations using the HARPS spectrograph on the ESO 3.6-meter telescope at La Silla in Chile have revealed unexpected daily changes on these spots, suggesting that they change under the influence of sunlight as Ceres rotates.

March 16, 2016: Observations made using the HARPS spectrograph at ESO’s La Silla Observatory in Chile have revealed unexpected changes in the bright spots on the dwarf planet Ceres. Although Ceres appears as little more than a point of light from the Earth, very careful study of its light shows not only the changes expected as Ceres rotates, but also that the spots brighten during the day and also show other variations. These observations suggest that the material of the spots is volatile and evaporates in the warm glow of sunlight.

Ceres is the largest body in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter and the only such object classed as a dwarf planet. NASA’s Dawn spacecraft has been in orbit around Ceres for more than a year and has mapped its surface in great detail. One of the biggest surprises has been the discovery of very bright spots, which reflect far more light than their much darker surroundings [1]. The most prominent of these spots lie inside the crater Occator and suggest that Ceres may be a much more active world than most of its asteroid neighbors.

New and very precise observations using the HARPS spectrograph at the ESO 3.6-meter telescope at La Silla, Chile, have now not only detected the motion of the spots due to the rotation of Ceres about its axis, but also found unexpected additional variations suggesting that the material of the spots is volatile and evaporates in sunlight.

The lead author of the new study, Paolo Molaro, at the INAF–Trieste Astronomical Observatory, takes up the story: "As soon as the Dawn spacecraft revealed the mysterious bright spots on the surface of Ceres, I immediately thought of the possible measurable effects from Earth. As Ceres rotates the spots approach the Earth and then recede again, which affects the spectrum of the reflected sunlight arriving at Earth.”

Ceres spins every nine hours and calculations showed that the effects due to the motion of the spots towards and away from the Earth caused by this rotation would be very small, of order 20 kilometers per hour. But this motion is big enough to be measurable via the Doppler effect with high-precision instruments such as HARPS.

The team observed Ceres with HARPS for a little over two nights in July and August 2015. "The result was a surprise," adds Antonino Lanza, at the INAF–Catania Astrophysical Observatory and co-author of the study. "We did find the expected changes to the spectrum from the rotation of Ceres, but with considerable other variations from night to night.”

The team concluded that the observed changes could be due to the presence of volatile substances that evaporate under the action of solar radiation [2]. When the spots inside the Occator crater are on the side illuminated by the Sun they form plumes that reflect sunlight very effectively. These plumes then evaporate quickly, lose reflectivity and produce the observed changes. This effect, however, changes from night to night, giving rise to additional random patterns, on both short and longer timescales.

If this interpretation is confirmed Ceres would seem to be very different from Vesta and the other main belt asteroids. Despite being relatively isolated, it seems to be internally active [3]. Ceres is known to be rich in water, but it is unclear whether this is related to the bright spots. The energy source that drives this continual leakage of material from the surface is also unknown.

Dawn is continuing to study Ceres and the behavior of its mysterious spots. Observations from the ground with HARPS and other facilities will be able to continue even after the end of the space mission.

Notes
[1] Bright spots were also seen, with much less clarity, in earlier images of Ceres from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope taken in 2003 and 2004.

[2] It has been suggested that the highly reflective material in the spots on Ceres might be freshly exposed water ice or hydrated magnesium sulphates.

[3] Many of the most internally active bodies in the Solar System, such as the large satellites of Jupiter and Saturn, are subjected to strong tidal effects due to their proximity to the massive planets.

More information
This research was presented in a paper entitled “Daily variability of Ceres’ Albedo detected by means of radial velocities changes of the reflected sunlight”, by P. Molaro et al., which appeared in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

The team is composed of P. Molaro (INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Trieste, Italy), A. F. Lanza (INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, Catania, Italy), L. Monaco (Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago, Chile), F. Tosi (INAF-IAPS Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Rome, Italy), G. Lo Curto (ESO, Garching, Germany), M. Fulle (INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Trieste, Italy) and L. Pasquini (ESO, Garching, Germany).

ESO is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world’s most productive ground-based astronomical observatory by far. It is supported by 16 countries: Austria, Belgium, Brazil, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom, along with the host state of Chile. ESO carries out an ambitious program focused on the design, construction and operation of powerful ground-based observing facilities enabling astronomers to make important scientific discoveries. ESO also plays a leading role in promoting and organizing cooperation in astronomical research. ESO operates three unique world-class observing sites in Chile: La Silla, Paranal and Chajnantor. At Paranal, ESO operates the Very Large Telescope, the world’s most advanced visible-light astronomical observatory and two survey telescopes. VISTA works in the infrared and is the world’s largest survey telescope and the VLT Survey Telescope is the largest telescope designed to exclusively survey the skies in visible light. ESO is a major partner in ALMA, the largest astronomical project in existence. And on Cerro Armazones, close to Paranal, ESO is building the 39-meter European Extremely Large Telescope, the E-ELT, which will become “the world’s biggest eye on the sky”.

Image Credit: ESO/L.Calçada/NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA/Steve Albers/N. Risinger (skysurvey.org)
Image Caption: European Southern Observatory (ESO)
Release Date: March 16, 2016

+Dawn Mission Engagement and Communications (E/C) 
+NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory 
+European Southern Observatory (ESO) 
+DLR, German Aerospace Center 
+NASA Solar System Exploration 

#NASA #ESO #Astronomy #Space #Science #Ceres #DwarfPlanet #Dawn #Spacecraft #SolarSystem #Telescope #LaSilla #Observatory #Chile #Atacama #Artist #Illustration
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Hot spots.
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David Nestler

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Nothing like the real thing.
 
The early flash of an exploding star, cought for the first time by the Kepler space telescope. Animation inside!

De första ögonblicken av en supernova fångades av rymdteleskopet Kepler.

#Kepler   #SpaceTelescope   #science   #supernova   #star   #NASA  
For the first time, the shock breakout of a supernova has been caught
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I see you.
 
View from Mars
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An image of the Rosette Nebula, one of the nebulae featured in the new book "The Armchair Astronomer — Vol. 1 (Nebulae)." 
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TODAY: We're hosting a Women’s History Month event at 12 p.m. EDT that examines the role of women in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), featuring some of our top leaders – women in STEM. Watch live at: http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv Question? Use #askNASAWomen
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Artist’s view: Ceres' bright spots found by NASA's Dawn spacecraft
This artist’s impression video is based on a detailed map of the surface compiled from images taken from NASA’s Dawn spacecraft in orbit around the dwarf planet Ceres. It shows the very bright patches of material in the crater Occator and elsewhere. New observations using the HARPS spectrograph on the ESO 3.6-meter telescope at La Silla in Chile have revealed unexpected daily changes on these spots, suggesting that they change under the influence of sunlight as Ceres rotates.

Credit: ESO/L.Calçada/NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA & Steve Albers
Release Date: March 16, 2016

+Dawn Mission Engagement and Communications (E/C) 
+European Southern Observatory (ESO) 
+NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory 
+NASA Solar System Exploration 
+DLR, German Aerospace Center 

#NASA #ESO #Astronomy #Space #Science #Ceres #DwarfPlanet #Crater #Occator #Dawn #Spacecraft #SolarSystem #Artist #Illustration #HD #Video
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On Friday, three humans will launch to the International Space Station. Their Soyuz spacecraft rolled out to the launch pad by train in the earlier today in Kazakhstan. The rocket is scheduled to lift off at 5:26 p.m. EDT carrying two Russians cosmonauts and NASA astronaut Jeff Williams to begin their five and a half month mission on the station. More: http://go.nasa.gov/1ROuDjN
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