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ASD and Me

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A great explaination of Asperger's from Dude, I'm an Aspie!
My name is Fuzzy and I have Asperger’s syndrome. What’s that mean, you ask? Well, you’re in luck, cause I’ve made this helpful guide! Asperger’s is a type of autism. Sometimes it makes me look differe...
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Check out this seven step process to teaching children with special needs about doing chores. How do you teach your child to do chores?
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A great post about respecting all the different viewpoints in the ASD community.
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ASD and Me

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Great post about the perspective of "person with autism" vrs. "autistic".
Stuart Duncan (AutismFather) originally shared:
 
The last word on “person first language”

I am writing this for one reason: far too many people tell me what to say, so instead of explaining to everyone, I’ll just give you this link. Please read.

The idea

The idea behind “person first language” is that you put the person first, for example: person with #autism . This emphasizes the person and not the disorder. Fine. Or so I thought.

But then I heard from several (and by several, I mean a LOT) of “people with autism” who specifically told me that they prefer the term “autistic” because autism is very much a part of who they are and how they perceive the world. They accept it, they embrace it and they want to be known as such. Fine. Or so I thought.

Not every “autistic” feels that way. Some actually do prefer “person with autism” because they hate how much autism has made their life suck (their words, not mine, really). Fine?

For some education systems, the teachers are actually told to use “person first language” because that’s what some parents insist on and it’s best that the education system not aggravate the parents. Fine.

So which did you tell me to do?

Here’s the thing. If I have dozens, even hundreds of “autistics” tell me to call them “autistics” because it’s what they want and then I have dozens, even hundreds of parents tell me to use “person with autism” because it’s what they want…. who do I side with?

Nobody.

I don’t take sides. First of all, it’s just ridiculous anyway. Seriously, is this what we spend our time on? Is this really a reason to get mad at each other? Can something this childish really begin to divide a community?

Well, no. The truth is, there’s a third group of people. They’re the “I don’t care” group. I love this group.

For most “autistics”, which are “people with autism”… they don’t care. Actually, they’d prefer you call them by their name. They’re more likely to respond. Further more, person, people, person of humanitarian decent… you know, what ever. It really doesn’t much matter.

For most parents of “autistic” children, which are “children with autism”… they don’t care. Again, using their name is generally the best option. But those parents really don’t mind how you refer to their children so long as you do it politely, nicely and with respect. They are their children after all.

I fall into the “I don’t care” group myself but in a way, I do care. I mean, if someone tells me they prefer one or the other, I’ll do my best to use that one method with that one person. I respect their wishes. But if that person is in a group of people, all of whom have various wishes or don’t care…. well, be ready for a mixed bag of terminology.

Don’t tell me how to speak, I don’t tell you how to dress

Quite frankly, I find it rude to tell me how I am to refer to my own child. Who are you anyway?

When my son comes to that point, if he does, and he tells me he prefers one way or another… you can bet your life I’ll stick to that one term…. with him. I’ll still use another term with another person if it’s what that person prefers.

In the mean time, until he tells me, or others tell me which they prefer, I’ll use the term that best fits the sentence. Because “the journey of my autistic child” sounds far better than “the journey of my child of which has autism”. That can’t be right.

Anyway, if you’re reading this because you’ve told me what to say, please visit the closest Walmart, buy some overalls, cowboy boots, pink shirt with the ruffles and the biggest hat you can find and wear that. Because I feel it’s only fair that you do something for me too.

It’s not that I don’t value your wishes, it’s not that I don’t understand exactly where you’re coming from. I do. And if the entire world said in one unanimous voice that it should be one way… then I would abide by that.

But it’s not that simple. I don’t make one group of people mad for the sake of making another group happy. There’s far better things to focus on that can benefit all people than this.

Thanks for reading.
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Yeah, I hear that. I will call anyone the way they want to be called, even if they want to be called ``Alabama Baked Donkey", or something that seems similarly insane to me. I don't care- I'm not being called it. But I expect the same from them. Call me autistic: Ok, that's what I call myself. Call me a ``person with autism": I'm not going to call you out in front of a group, but I'll probably let you know later that I prefer not to be referred to that way. Say I ``suffer from autism": Yeah. BIG mistake. Don't care who or where you are. You are getting the lecture that you can ONLY use that one if the person you are talking about has told you they suffer from being autistic. If they've said/typed/signed/otherwise communicated that they suffer because of it, go right ahead. You're saying something they've said is accurate.
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Autism originally shared:
 
Inspiring article below helping those on the spectrum with jobs in their community!
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Have them in circles
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ASD and Me

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Addison is in the 6th grade, her first year in middle school. She did pretty well in elementary school, but she’s getting slammed in 6th grade. A couple of her teachers have described her appearing distracted, making mistakes with details, and being disorganized with her work. Addison admits to “zoning out” a lot during classes like English, Spanish, science, and geography. So clearly she has ADHD and could use some medication to help her focus.

Except that maybe she doesn’t have ADHD at all.
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I have high functioning autism and I am 31 yrs old . It doesn't go away and always stays a part of you :0)
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Voting has opened for About.com's favorite special needs book of 2012. There are a couple of autism books that have made the finals, including ASD and Me! Check out the link and vote for your favorite special needs children's book today!
Vote for Favorite New Special-Needs Children's Book
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From wandering to inclusion, NBC's Parenthood has put disability issues at the forefront since its debut in 2010. Now, the show is set to take on excuses.
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Stuart Duncan (AutismFather) originally shared:
 
Joint ASAN-Autism Society Statement on DSM 5

By the way, if you're getting tired of hearing from me about this, or all of the links, just let me know. It just seems to be the hot topic in the #Autism world right now.

If you do still want more, check out this join statement from the Autistic Self Advocacy Network and Autism Society.
The autism spectrum is broad and diverse, including individuals with a wide range of functional needs, strengths and challenges. The DSM-5's criteria for the new, unified autism spectrum disorder ...
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Check out this great post about the feelings a parent can go through when they see their child interacting with other children. I could really relate to this post. Even though I am so blessed and lucky that my son has so many skills, I still sometimes get teary-eyed when I realize that has trouble doing the things that other kids can do so easily.
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Have them in circles
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Dedicated to explaining Autism Spectrum Disorder to children.
Introduction
This page is dedicated to explaining autism and Aspergers to children. A couple of years ago, my then five year old son, Donnie, asked me when his younger sister would attend “PIE School,” the autism therapy center that he attended. This simple question got me thinking about how I would explain to him why he is different from other children. What would I tell him when we have our first talk about his autism?

Even though my son has some trouble communicating, he still has lots of big thoughts and ideas. I searched for a children’s book that had a character with autism that my son could relate to and look up to. When I couldn’t find such a book, I was inspired to write ASD and Me.

Written for kids diagnosed with Aspergers, PPD-NOS, or autism, parents will appreciate the way this heartwarming book will help them explain high functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) to their child on the spectrum. ASD and Me is written from the point of view of Eli, a seven year-old boy that has high functioning autism spectrum disorder. Through the story, Eli explains how he was diagnosed and how ASD affects the way he thinks and interprets the world around him. He also talks about some of the social and life skills he has learned that help him fit in with others. The story concludes with some of the interests and activities that Eli shares with other children. A Letter to Parents section at the end of the book offers detailed information about the symptoms of high functioning ASD, which would be helpful in explaining the disorder to extended family and friends.
 
View this video on youtube to see a preview of the book, ASD and Me.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SU-7946HlMw 
 
Links to purchase:  Check out our website:  http://charitypressbooks.com/.  Ebook available at Smashwords, iTunes, Barnes and Noble, Kobo, Diesel and Sony.  Print version available on Amazon.

We would love to hear your insights on parenting an ASD child or living with ASD. We would especially like to hear about the experience you have had either telling your child about their ASD diagnosis, or what is it was like to find out that you have ASD.