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Burley House Dental Care
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Extra sugar makes British cereal favourites among sweetest in world....

British cereals are among the least healthy in the world, with favourites from Nestle and Kellogg's having more sugar than their equivalents in other nations.

Among the worst offenders are Crunchy Nut Cornflakes and Multigrain Cheerios, the U.K. Versions of which contain higher sugar levels than in any other country.

In Britain, packs of Crunchy Nut Cornflakes contain 35g of sugar per 100g- equivalent to half the daily recommended intake of sugar for a 3 year old in one serving.

Experts described the levels of sugar in cereals as "shocking" and called on Nestle and Kellogg's to "save lives" by dramatically cutting the amount it adds to its products. The attempt by manufactures to please the sweet tooth of British families goes against the Government's crackdown on sugar, introduced over fears it is fuelling dangerous levels of childhood obesity.
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08/12/2016
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Did you know that children were given cocaine drop for tooth ache in 1885.
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This month is Mouth Cancer awareness month.
Mouth cancer is one of a very small number of cancers that is on the increase. It is the fifth most common cancer in the world ( the most common cancer in India) and is more likely to kill us than skin cancer, which most people are far more aware of.

Smoking and drinking greatly increase your risk of developing the condition, but experts think that in the next decade Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) will overtake smoking to become the leading cause of the disease. HPV is sexually transmitted and was the cause of the cancer Michael Douglas had.

In this country, teenage girls are vaccinated against HPV primarily to protect them against cervical cancer, but they are also protected against mouth cancer caused by HPV. Teenage boys are not vaccinated, hopefully this will change in future.

Major symptoms to look out for are ulcers that persist more than 3 weeks, unexplained red or white patches in the mouth and unusual lumps and swellings.

The good news is that you are all screened for mouth cancer at your dental checkups by Catherine and Laura, who know exactly what to look for as they both have undergone specialist training in oral surgery and worked part time as teachers at Leeds Dental Institute.
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Brush with danger..

A motorist is caught finishing his morning routine at the wheel by a fellow commuter on the M62. The man allegedly brushed away for five minutes, at speeds of up to 60 mph...
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'Smiliest' time of the week revealed in new survey

The 'smilies the time of the week is five o'clock on a Friday according to a new survey.

The Oral Health Foundation carried out a nationwide survey of more than 2,000 UK adults to find out when the most popular time to smile was to help raise awareness of National Smile Month.

Five o'clock was found to be the most popular, tailing off throughout the weekend.

The most frowny time was shown to be seven o'clock on a Monday morning, although this remains relatively low throughout the whole week.

At Burley House we Buck the trend as we smile constantly especially first thing on a Monday when we have a week of teeth to look forward to...
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Ever wonder what Catherine and Laura do with the teeth they take out?
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November is Mouth Cancer Action Month, so be like Clare and Helen and show your support by wearing your blue lips at:
http://www.bluelipselfie.co.uk

Mouth cancer doesn't discriminate and can affect anyone, regardless of age, gender or lifestyle. Find out more:
http://bit.ly/2fbzFyO
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16/11/2016
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Brighten your day by reading these tooth fairy stories from Readers Digest.
http://www.rd.com/funny-stuff/tooth-fairy-stories/

We defy you to read these and not smile!

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Catherine's Friday fact
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Australian freshwater crayfish have a tooth enamel very similar to humans. Nature sometimes copies its own particularly successful developments. Scientists have now found that the teeth of the Australian freshwater crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus are covered with an enamel amazingly similar to that of vertebrates. Both materials consist of calcium phosphate and are also very alike in terms of their microstructure. This extremely hard substance has apparently developed in freshwater crayfish independently from vertebrates, as it makes the teeth particularly strong.
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