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Clara Moskowitz
Works at Scientific American
Lives in Brooklyn, NY
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Clara Moskowitz

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Loren Chantland's profile photoAlistair Riddoch's profile photoRonald Patrick Marriott's profile photoRalph Ellis's profile photo
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Regards your Carolina Bays article, many moons ago, here is another view on this mystery......

* The Carolina Bays and the Destruction of North America. *

What created the many elliptical Carolina Bay landform depressions?
And what caused the Younger Dryas cooling period 12,900 years ago?

Could these two seemingly disparate topics be linked in any way? Ralph Ellis takes a look at current research on both of these subjects, and discovers that they are likely to be linked to a large meteoric impact in the Great Lakes region some 12,900 years ago. It was the ejecta from this impact that created the Carolina Bays, and it was the same ejecta that blanketed the Earth and caused the Younger Dryas cooling period.

https://www.academia.edu/17274053/The_Carolina_Bays_and_the_destruction_of_North_America

Please contact me for further information.

Sincerely,
Ralph Ellis

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Clara Moskowitz

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Here's a neat proposal on how to use the Kepler telescope now that it's hobbled with just two reaction wheels:
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hm
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Our galaxy's black hole is a messy eater: 
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Eddie Lomax's profile photoClara Moskowitz's profile photoRonald Patrick Marriott's profile photoPeter Dawson's profile photo
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I  saw  a  2012  post  by  Clara  arguing  that  "everything  you  think  you  know  about  black  holes  is  wrong."  I  thought,  "At  last!  Someone  will  agree  with  me  that  black  holes can't  finish  coming  into  existence  relative  to  us!,"  which  means  that  for  our  purposes  there  is  no  such  thing  as  a  black  hole.  But  I  was  wrong.  She  wrote  what  she  wrote  for  other  reasons.  Clara  blurbs  up  above  that the  Milky  Way's  black hole  "is  a  messy  eater."   No  it  isn't.  It  doesn't  exist,  relative  to  us.  The  logic  is  simple:  Relative  to  distant  observers  --  us  --  all  collapsars  never  stop  being  collapsars.  As  the  collapsing  material   approaches  its  own  event-horizon-in-formation,  relative  to  us,   it  approaches  the  event-horizon-in-formation  asymptotically  --  slower  and  slooooooooower  and  sloooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooower,  relative  to  us.  That  is  why  we  call  it  an  "event  horizon,"  is  it  not?  So,  every  single  one  of  these  things  which  astronomers  call  "black  holes"   aren't  "black  holes."    They  are  collapsars  with  accretion  disks  --  without  exception.  For  these  things  to  be  black  holes,  relative  to  us,   we  have  to  be  non-distant  observers.  When  we  are  non-distant  observers,  the  perfect  paradox  of  relativity  is  experienced  --   what  doesn't  exist   relative  to  distant  observers  "suddenly"  "begins"  to  "exist"   relative  to  us  for  the  same  object.  It  was  this  logic  which  made  me  think  that  those  who  expressed  a  fear  that  what  they  referred  to  as  "mini  black  holes"   might  be  created  by  the  Collider  might  be  correct.   In  fact,  the  objects  would  be  permanently-extant-and-perpetually-destructive  "mini  collapsars,"   just  as  dangerous  as  the  imagined  black  holes,  carving  their  way  through  Earth  with  ever-growing  super-hot  accretion  disks  and  jets!
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It's definitely a concept under consideration!
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It's pretty exciting to think what this Planck data might tell us: 
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I'm not bringing religion into this equation but if something is 100% efficient isn't that equal to God?
Or some type of Devine creation that is beyond our most wildest dreams to be 100% efficient
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These images are absolutely gorgeous:
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Wow. Makes me think of this Monty python - Universe song ( original )
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Here what we know now about the developing situation on the space station:
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Dark matter is just one of the reasons the Fermi telescope may be changing tacks:
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+Mamudou Gumaneh
Yes... antigravity antioxygen and more
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Water, oil, molten rock and plasma all have differing viscosities. They do not pool in certain areas but move about the earth, by forces, perhaps other than gravity. Frequency may play a role, as well as human interaction.
My point is though that perhaps the inconsistent measurement of gravity may be caused by the location and quantity of these viscous bodies.
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I can't recommend the new shuttle Atlantis display at Kennedy Space Center high enough - truly amazing!
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I can't wait to observe the stars on August, 28
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I'll be very curious to see if this potential dark matter signal pans out: 
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Hi Clara,
I have regular reader of your post. Please share your skype to send you message.
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Awesome night sky photos from Bangalore by +Ajay Talwar 
 
A Garden in the City of Gardens
All Sky Image of the Glass house at Lal Bagh and stars above.
17 May 2013
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IVE BEEN INTO QUANTUM FOR QUIT SOMETIME . IM A SIMPLE MAN AND FINDING OTHERS WITH LIKE MINDED THOUGHTS AND INTRESTS ARENT EASILY COME BY. I NEVER BEEN SCHOOLED TO LEARN THE BASICS OF ANYTHING THAT HAS TO DO WITH QUANTUM AND YET I STILL FIND MYSELF IN DELIGHT TO READ AND LEARN AND TEACH. I BELIEVE THE UNIVERSE IS LIKE THOUGHTS IN A SENSE. EVER EXPANDING THE AWARENESS OF THE EXPANSION AND CONTRACTION OF THE UNIVERSE. MY KNOWLEDGE MOSTLY CAME FROM INTENSE THOUGHTS .NATURAL AWARENESS BRINGS ENLIGHTMENT THOUGH "SUN GAZING"
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Have her in circles
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Science Writer
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  • Scientific American
    Senior Editor, 2013 - present
  • Space.com
    Assistant Managing Editor, 2008 - 2013
  • LiveScience
    Senior Writer, 2008 - 2013
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Senior Editor at Scientific American
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