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Fortress Anchors
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Stronger. Faster. Lighter.
Stronger. Faster. Lighter.

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Remember when you were a little kid and you would wake up early on Christmas morning feeling super-excited? That’s how I feel on Super Bowl Sunday.” Clarkson Potter, Super Bowl Sunday Seafood Gumbo

A great way to enjoy your catch!

#recipe #superbowl

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Thanks for choosing Fortress Anchors, Mike! We appreciate your patronage!
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New to #powerboating?

By no means are we a substitute for on-the-water training classes, but these 5 tips are helpful to understand the basics of each maneuver.

1. Leaving a dock:

Backing away from a dock usually offers the best maneuvering control. It also avoids a problem inherent to forward departures when the boat starts to turn and its stern swings into the dock, preventing the boat from departing cleanly. Start by turning the wheel away from the dock, which rotates the propeller away from the dock. Shift into reverse, the stern swings away from the dock as the boat backs away. To avoid scraping the bow against the dock, make your turning angle slight. When clear of the dock, turn the wheel in the opposite direction to bring the boat parallel to the dock. Center the wheel, pause briefly in neutral while counting 1-2-3, then shift to forward.

2. Minimum Speed Control:

A capability that is a "must" for anyone operating a powerboat in close quarters or around other boats or persons in the water. Minimum control speed is the slowest speed at which you can operate and still maintain steering control. Typically, this is less than the speed produced when the engine is in gear and the throttle is set at idle RPM, and is accomplished by the use of intermittent power. With the throttle at idle RPM, shift from neutral to forward and back to neutral. This produces a short, gentle pulse of power to maintain steering control. Repeat this technique to keep the boat under control and moving slowly. 

3. Holding Position:

The key to holding position is to anticipate boat drift and make small, gentle corrections early rather than large powerful corrections late. There are two methods for holding position: Bow into Waves, and Stern into Waves. Since the bow will usually have a tendency to turn away from the wind, you will have to compensate for this by periodically shifting into forward gear and making slight steering corrections to bring the bow back into the wind. Because the bow wants to turn downwind, it is usually easier to hold position with the stern into the wind, provided the waves don't come over the transom.

4. High-Speed Stop:

To avoid a possible collision with a submerged object or another boat it may be necessary to stop your boat quickly. To be able to respond promptly, keep one hand on the throttle and the other on the steering wheel at all times. All occupants should be in their seats and have a secure grip on the boat. As a boat rolls in a tight turn, it always slides sideways. There is a risk in some boats of the boat's wake coming over the transom. To avoid this flooding problem, reduce throttle to idle RPM. Make a 90-degree turn. Shift into neutral. 

5. Docking:

To master this important maneuver you need to be aware of how your powerboat steers and reacts to changes in throttle and gearshift in different wind and current conditions. Place fenders at dock level and prepare dock lines before making the final approach. Be sure everyone knows what to do with the dock lines. Come alongside the dock with the bow pointing into the wind or current, whichever is stronger. Approach the dock slowly at a 25 to 45 degree angle and use intermittent power to maintain minimum control speed. When the bow is 1/2 to one boat length from the dock, make a smooth turn to bring the boat almost parallel to the dock by turning the wheel and briefly shifting into forward. Then shift to neutral. Turn the wheel toward the dock and briefly shift to reverse to bring the stern in as the boat stops.

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Thanks for choosing #fortressanchors, Roger Wilhoit!
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Look for Fortress Marine Anchors at the Miami International Boat Show!
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Thanks for choosing #fortressanchors, Karl Coplan!
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Before the Introduction of the gasoline engine, this watercraft was a well-known fishing boat in Maine.

Stay tuned for the answer! #Trivia
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We hope you had a Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays! We're looking forward to the New Year! 

Have you made your resolutions yet?
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Barbecued Chilean #SeaBass With Orange

Sea Bass is one of the most popular fish, yet some of the fish referred to as Sea Bass are not actually Bass. This allows us the ability to use a wide variety of fish for one recipe or one fish for many recipes. This being said, the sea bass is a lean saltwater fish that is meaty and suitable for most types of cooking.
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