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Justin Mazzi originally shared:
 
This post is a bit overdue but I feel the need to share it. For those of you who don't know the former co-founder of Site5, +Matt Lightner, passed away back on Christmas day 2011 http://www.site5.com/blog/s5/saying-goodbye-to-a-founder/20111228/. The news came as a complete shock to everybody. Matt had many passions - coding, music and cooking to name a few - and was full of life.

When I first took over engineering at Site5 I started work on one of his biggest projects, Synco & Backstage. You can read about the projects here http://www.eng5.com/projects.html. Over the years there have been many contributers but I'm not here to talk about them. Synco development has been an amazing adventure for me, one full of twists and turns that kept things exciting and new everyday. When questions would arise I would shoot Matt an email or try to hit him up on chat. He was excited to help me with anything I needed. What's more is he was excited about what I was doing with the app; that meant a lot to me. Unfortunately I never had the pleasure of meeting Matt in person, and yet I feel like I knew him pretty well. I know this may sound really corny, but I feel like I got to know him pretty well reading his code. Sometimes a surprise commit message like,

"Gor tickets almost working perfectly in Backstage. Going on 40 hours straight programming... can hardly type or see. Can't sleep--clown will eat me!"

would just totally make my day. Other times I would read over an implementation of something that didn't make it's way into the Ruby community until YEARS later. One great example of that was the task processing system we still use today. It's basically delayed_job but with a little more functionality.

Over the years of reading through his code, sweat, and tears I would be lying if I said I didn't learn a lot. That's one of my favorite parts of software development; you leave your mark and it can stay for many years to come. Right now we're in the process of rewriting Synco & Backstage and that makes me both sad and excited. One thing that puts my mind at ease is knowing that some parts of his work will be reborn in the second version. The code still continues to inspire me to build ontop of what he had done and make it my own.

I wish Matt's family the best and want to thank you for the support you gave him growing up. Without Matt, Site5 wouldn't have been started and I wouldn't have had the pleasure of working for what I consider a great company.
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Allen MacCannell's profile photo
 
After his mother posted on a web hosting board about how he started the company at 14 and she was instructed not to tell customers that they had to wait until he got home from school before calling them back, someone replied "You now have millions of sons".