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Joseph Bennington-Castro
Works at Self
Attended New York University
Lives in Aiea, Hawaii
340 followers|13,352 views
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Brain scans reveal when your decisions are getting risky.
For the first time, scientists have shown that they can predict when people will make risky decisions based on brain activity patterns. Could this lead to a world where we consult brain scans to predict whether we're making a risky choice or not?
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Zombie ants!
Throughout the tropical forests of the world, there's a parasitic fungus that turns unwitting ants into "zombies." Just how the fungus is able to control the brains of its insect slaves is unknown, but Charissa de Bekker, a post-doctoral researcher at Penn State University, is determined to find out. We caught up with de Bekker to learn more about her fascinating work.
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Why would a bird help another raise its chicks?
Humans often rear their children with help from family and friends. But why would such a strategy evolve? What could we possibly get out of rearing somebody else's child? Now, scientists believe that they've unraveled this mystery -- at least when it comes to birds. In some species, birds temporarily forgo having chicks so that they can help their family members raise their children. Here's why this "cooperative breeding" strategy might have evol...
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Meet the duck-billed dinosaur with the rooster comb.
When scientists discovered that some dinosaurs had feathers, it completely changed our perception of what the ancient animals looked like -- and pissed a lot of people off. Now, in another twist, researchers have found that the duck-billed dinosaur Edmontosaurus regalis had a fleshy crest similar to a rooster's comb.
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Just in time for the holidays: Why would we evolve to poop in the same place as our friends and family?
Humans aren't the only creatures who share communal toilets -- many mammals do this. In fact, new research shows this behavior was an ancient evolutionary development. Scientists have discovered a large, rhino-like reptile defecated in "communal latrines" some 240 million years ago.
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Did snakes help steer our evolution?
The “snake detection theory” holds that snakes played a significant role in the evolution of humans and other primates. They molded our brains, shaped our visual systems, and helped us survive. Now there is new evidence to back up this unusual theory, which explains both our agile minds and our uncanny ability to sense the presence of snakes.
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Why having a green thumb may be important on a mission to the red planet
A space architecture team has five reasons why astronauts need space greenhouses.
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Meet the tobacco hornworm, a caterpillar that regularly eats tobacco leaves loaded with nicotine. Research now shows this little bugger has a strange and unique defense against hungry spiders: It "puffs out" nicotine, creating a kind of toxic bad breath.
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How did cats become domesticated? 
Researchers studying a 5,000-year-old archaeological site in China have discovered that wildcats first came to ancient villages to feed on rodents, which were stealing farmers' grains. The research shows, for the first time, how the process of cat domestication started.
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Which fruits do fruit flies like most?
It seems like fruit flies will target any fruit that's lying around in your kitchen. But when given the choice, these annoying pests actually prefer citrus like oranges, limes, and lemons. And there's a good reason for it, too.
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This experiment changed our understanding of parasite resistance
It's common scientific wisdom that parasite resistance comes from repeated exposure to a parasite. But a new study has turned this idea on its head. Guppies who were removed from rivers swarming with parasites actually evolved an improved parasite tolerance in just a few generations. Here's how it happened.
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Marmosets Have Conversations That Sound Strikingly Human
Marmosets are fluffy, 8-inch-long monkeys native to South America. They are also very polite. New research shows that these little mammals carry on lengthy, back-and-forth discussions without interrupting one another. This is a conversation style adopted by only one other kind of primate: humans.
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People
Have him in circles
340 people
take “MMIMMH” movies's profile photo
Laura Geggel's profile photo
qari Usman's profile photo
Юлия Маркова's profile photo
Usman Saleem's profile photo
Fabrizio Fubelli's profile photo
oyinloye stephen's profile photo
Bliz Video's profile photo
Patricia Diaz's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Science journalist
Skills
I write about science!
Employment
  • Self
    Freelance Science Journalist, 2012 - present
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Aiea, Hawaii
Previously
New York City
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Tagline
Science!
Education
  • New York University
    Science Journalism, 2010 - 2011
  • University of Hawaii
    Professional Writing, 2009
  • University of Hawaii
    Physics, 2002 - 2007
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Gender
Male
Other names
Bennington-Castro