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Abraham Williams
22,993 followers -
Experienced developer, start-up founder, and international speaker working at Bendyworks
Experienced developer, start-up founder, and international speaker working at Bendyworks

22,993 followers
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Progressive Web App Example code

In preparation for presenting Leverage the Power of Native with Progressive Web Apps at WindyCity DevCon this past week. +Pearl Latteier and myself developed a sample app we call Sprinkle. It is written in ES2015 and uses a service Worker to cache offline rich media pulled from the Unsplash API.

App: https://sprinkle.works/
Source: https://github.com/abraham/sprinkle

#gde #webtechnolgy #html5 #opensourcecode
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First +Google Glass update in almost three years...

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Join the Material Gallery Early Adopter Program!

Like staying ahead of the curve when it comes to design tools? Meet Gallery, a design collaboration app that makes it easy to find, present, and discuss work from a shared, central place. Brought to you by the #MaterialDesign team, Gallery simplifies a designer’s workflow and gives you a handy hub for team feedback, organization, and a magic link that always leads to the latest iteration of your work.

Be one of the first to try Gallery by participating in the Early Adopter Program, and visit material.io/gallery for more info.
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Google is making it easier than ever to give any app the power of object recognition

The company has open sourced a number of mobile-first machine vision programs. Smartphones have fast become the new frontier of artificial intelligence. Algorithms that used to run in the cloud, beaming results down to our devices via the internet, are now being replaced by software that runs directly on phones and tablets. Facebook is doing it, Apple is doing it, and Google is (perhaps) doing it slightly more than anyone else. The latest example of mobile AI from the Silicon Valley search giant is the release of MobileNets, a set of machine vision neural networks designed to run directly on mobile devices. The networks come in a variety of sizes to fit all sort of devices (bigger neural nets for more powerful processors) and can be trained to tackle a number of tasks. MobileNets can be used to analyze faces, detect common objects, geo-locate photos, and perform fine-grained recognition tasks, like identifying different species of dogs. These tools are extremely adaptable, and could be put to a number of different uses, including powering augmented reality features, or creating apps to help the disabled. Google says the performance of each neural net differs from task to task, but overall, its networks either meet or approach recent state-of-the-art standards. For consumers, this is going to mean more mobile apps with AI functions as developers start incorporating these tools. Running these sort of tasks directly on-device has a number of benefits for everyday users, including faster performance, greater convenience (you don’t have to connect to the internet), and better privacy (your data isn’t being sent off-device).


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Android Things Developer Preview 4.1

Today, we’re releasing the Developer Preview 4.1 of Android Things, which now includes support for new NXP development boards, as well as bug fixes and improvements for other platforms.

Boot times have been improved on some hardware platforms, and an optimized variant of Google Play Services for IoT is now included. We have also made all our talks and codelabs from Google I/O available so developers can easily learn how to get started with Android Things.

See the blog post https://goo.gl/44ioX5 for more information, watch the videos, try the codelabs, and join the discussion in our Google+ community at https://g.co/iotdev. #AndroidThings

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Making the G+1 button load more quickly

The G+1 button is shown billions of times per day on web pages around the world, so it’s important that it load as quickly and efficiently as possible. To make it easier for people to load and share the pages they’re interested in, we’ve created a simpler G+1 button sharing experience.

Beginning in a few weeks, clicking the +1 button will open a streamlined new Google+ sharing dialog, and the G+1 button will no longer display a +1 count. If you’re a publisher, you can rest assured that these +1s do not affect search ranking and the size and layout of the button will remain the same.

These changes will only affect the G+1 button outside of Google+. The +1 button within Google+ will continue to work the same way it always has.

If you’d like to view all of the pages you’ve +1’d over the years, you can download a list using Google Takeout.

We hope this change makes it that much easier to check out and recommend all the interesting things you discover!

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