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Dave Alber
Travel Writer • Travel Illustrator. •. Fearless Adventurer. •. http://davealber.com
Travel Writer • Travel Illustrator. •. Fearless Adventurer. •. http://davealber.com
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March 8th exhibition: Ravages of Time & Permanence of Wonder. 2 Person Show: Benj Kinenga & Dave Alber. Amazing communicative and controlled impasto oil painting techniques share the transformations of time through the open state of wonder. Paintings depict stasis and change; the pulsation of the mind between the open state and time-bound awareness. The viewer’s experience is sustained in an open state that transcends the ravages of time. http://ilovetravelart.com. Please like and share!

#travel #china #davealber #suzhou #travelchina travelblogger #painting #oilpainting #travelart #travelartist #suzhou #tourism #art #artist #artexhibit #artshow #artexhibition #contemporaryart #artist #davealber #benjkinenga #artgallery #time #wonder #world
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Dave Alber’s final Bad Year to Be a Cat comic celebrates Chinese Dog Year in China from the perspective of a cat living in multicultural Shanghai. In this final serialized comic, Dave brings us to Saint Ignatius Cathedral in Shanghai and invites us to experience it through the eyes of a cat.
This Travel Art comic, Bad Year to Be a Cat was published in That’s Shanghai Magazine. This final comic visits Saint Ignatius Cathedral in Shanghai.
For more information about Dave Alber’s Bad Year to Be a Cat comic or Travel Art, please visit http://davealber.com or http://travelart.online.
#travelart, #comic, #dogyear, #santignazio, #ignatian, #cathedral, #church, #catholic, #architecture, #cat, #dog, #travel, #shanghai, #2018, #art, #illustration, #chinesezodiac
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China Art Museum! Dave Alber’s Comic Bad Year to Be a Cat celebrates Chinese Dog Year in China from the perspective of a cat living in multicultural Shanghai. In the second serialized comic, Dave brings us to the China Art Museum in Shanghai and invites us to experience it through the eyes of a cat.
This Travel Art comic, Bad Year to Be a Cat was published in That’s Shanghai Magazine. The third comic visits the China Art Museum in Shanghai.
For more information about Dave Alber’s Bad Year to Be a Cat comic or Travel Art, please visit http://davealber.com or http://travelart.online.
#travelart, #Comic, #dogyear, #chinaartmuseum, #2018, #Shanghai, #art, #illustration, #travel, chinamuseum, #chinaart, #shanghaimuseum, #shanghaitravel
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Dave Alber’s Comic “Bad Year to Be a Cat” Celebrates the Yuyuan Garden Bazaar during Chinese Dog Year.
Dave Alber’s Comic Bad Year to Be a Cat celebrated Chinese Dog Year in China from the perspective of a cat living in multicultural Shanghai. In the second serialized comic, Dave brings us to Yuyuan Garden Bazaar in Shanghai and invites us to experience it through the eyes of a cat.
This Travel Art comic, Bad Year to Be a Cat was published in That’s Shanghai Magazine. The second comic visits Yuyuan Garden Bazaar.
For more information about Dave Alber’s Bad Year to Be a Cat comic or Travel Art, please visit http://davealber.com.
#travelart, #Comic, #dogyear, #yuyuan, #2018, #Shanghai, #art, #illustration, #travel
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Dave Alber’s comic “Bedding Shanghai” is available in China as a giclée print. The edition was printed in an edition of 108 on a POD magazine press in Suzhou, China. Prints are available at KunChef in Kunshan.
Bedding Shanghai was featured at the Shanghai International Literary Festival. It contains fully painted comic pages, featuring architectural paintings of the two sides of the Bund: both Puxi, and Pudong. Giving erotic meaning to the painted art is poetry that mythopoetically re-presents the city as an anima image… reimagining it as a lover.
At the Shanghai International Literary Festival, Alber’s comic was so well received, that That’s Shanghai Magazine editors asked Dave to create a similar comic for the magazine. Bad Year to Be a Cat was created for That’s Shanghai Magazine.
Dave Alber says, “It was a pleasure to show the audience at the Shanghai International Literary Festival that comics aren’t limited to men in tights, but that they can communicate something as subtle as the Eros of being a traveller in a great city. The response of people… and the magazine… of asking to see more of this work has been personally affirming. I’m deeply grateful.”
“Bedding Shanghai” prints are available at the INTIMATIONS exhibition at KunChef in Kunshan. KunChef is the master work of three five-star chefs. By visiting all over the world for delicious food, they blend the strengths of Chinese and Western cuisines. Their culinary intention mirros the travel art intention behind the ongoing INTIMATIONS exhibition.
For more information about Dave Alber, the Bedding Shanghai or Bad Year to Be a Cat comics, or Travel Art, please visit http://davealber.com.

#shanghai, #bund, #comic, #art, #illustration, #comics, #davealber, #travelart, #2018
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1/14/19
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Dave Alber’s comic “Bedding Shanghai” was recently featured in the Shanghai International Literary Festival. Part of the Shanghai Erotic Fiction Contest, it was also featured in That’s Shanghai Magazine. The artist and writer, Dave Alber, read the comic while displaying the illustrations at the Shanghai festival event at M on the Bund. The comic was so well received, that That’s Shanghai Magazine asked Dave Alber create a similar comic for the magazine.
The Bedding Shanghai comic contains fully painted comic pages, featuring architectural paintings of the two sides of the Bund: both Puxi, and Pudong. Giving erotic meaning to the painted art is poetry describing the city of Shanghai as a lover.
Ned Kelly, editor of That’s Shanghai magazine stated about the addition of comic art: “This is our seventh Erotic Fiction Competition, going on seven years, and Dave Alber has added a whole new element to it.”
Judges at the Shanghai Erotic Fiction Contest were Ann James of Urban Aphrodite, Clara Davis of Unravel, Lit Fest author Osamah Sami and That’s Shanghai’s Erica Martin. Judges described the Bedding Shanghai comic as follows: “The effort that Dave put into making Bedding Shanghai… it’s just wonderful.” (Osamah Sami, Lit Fest author); “Honestly, I have thought so much about Puxi and Pudong, but I’ve never thought about it like this. The visuals on that page, the breasts swelling, the Puxi and Pudong breasts. I can’t even. So much effort. Thank you for sharing this with us. What a gift.” (Clara Davis, Founder of Unravel); “Very beautifully drawn. ‘Separated by fluid, conjoined by fluid’ is the most poetic description of Pudong and Puxi that I’ve ever heard. I also like the line, ‘Thrusting, thrusting, thrusting’: a very simple description of three Shanghai landmarks. Simple and effective.” (Erica Martin, Arts Editor at That’s Shanghai magazine); “I’d agree, simple and effective. I think you did it very very nicely.” (Ann James, theatre producer at DreamWeaver Productions).
Dave Alber says that the comic is archetypal of his unique genre of Travel Art. In his forthcoming Travel Art catalogue, Intimations, Dave Alber describes his unique genre of Travel Art as being, “… painted with the intent to connect with others and share a mutual — and mirror-like — sense of wonder and joy within this world we inhabit. Paintings depict people, temples, cityscapes, food and drink, rituals of remembrance, and celebrations of friendship. The images are of the world we share... together.”
At the Shanghai International Literary Festival, Alber’s comic was so well received, that That’s Shanghai Magazine asked Dave to create a similar comic for the magazine. Bad Year to Be a Cat was created for That’s Shanghai Magazine. Bad Year to Be a Cat plays on the idea of a cat’s experience during Dog Year in China. The comic celebrates the different cultural areas of Shanghai with humor and beautifully rendered artwork in styles that reflect the cultural diversity of Shanghai. Each comic introduces the reader to a new area of Shanghai and connects the reader to it with humor and a sense of wonder. Some areas highlighted are Shanghai’s Former French Concession, the Yuyuan Garden Bazar, and the China Art Museum.
Dave Alber says, “It was a pleasure to show the audience at the Shanghai International Literary Festival that comics aren’t limited to men in tights, but that they can communicate something as subtle as the Eros of being a traveller in great city. The response of people… and the magazine… of asking to see more of this work has been personally affirming. I’m deeply grateful.”
For more information about Dave Alber, the Bedding Shanghai or Bad Year to Be a Cat comics, or Travel Art, please visit http://davealber.com.

#litfest, #bund, #shanghai, #comic, #comics, #art, #illustration, #traveling, #davealber
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INTIMATIONS 领悟丨Dave Alber个人特色画展 KunChef昆厨
领悟
Dave Alber个人特色画展
The art exhibition INTIMATIONS by Dave Alber
主办方丨Sponsor
昆 厨丨Kun·Chef
开幕时间丨Opening Date
2018年12月30日丨December 30 2018
15:30-16:30
地点丨Location
中国昆山杜克大道505号大渔湾商业广场D03
D03, No.505,Duke Avenue, Kunshan, 215300, Jiangsu
Are you fascinated by travel? What exciting images of exotic places come to your mind when you imagine adventuring in a new travel experience? Do you think of a relaxing time at the beach or the enjoyment of viewing art in one of the world’s great cities? Do you hear the sound of wild birdcall or smell the fragrant scent of a delicious meal created just as you like it?
The art exhibition INTIMATIONS is coming to KunChef in Kunshan. It features the Travel Art and Travel Writing of Dave Alber.
Dave’s art and writing touch our curiosity, speak to our sense of wonder at the world we live in, and offer - through colorful paintings - a sense of shared fascination and delight in our travel discoveries. Dave shares a traveler’s wonder and pleasure in China and other Asian countries.
Read full article:
https://lnkd.in/g65QjQ9 hashtag#paintings hashtag#exhibition hashtag#art hashtag#artexhibitions hashtag#travelwriting hashtag#kunshan hashtag#fineart hashtag#suzhou hashtag#painting hashtag#travelart hashtag#davealber hashtag#artopening #2019 hashtag#opening hashtag#chinaart
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Intimations: An Interview with Dave Alber
Dave Alber is an illustrator, graphic designer, writer and traveler. Having been living in Suzhou for two years, he is now having an exhibition of his travel art from January 1 to March 31 in Kunshan.
When did you start painting?
It starts when I was a child. I went into my father’s study, he had some paints there, because he used to paint when he was younger. My brother and I were like, “oh my god, we’re painters today.” So I stuck with painting. I studied art in university, so I have an associate in art degree and then a bachelor in art degree, a BFA.
Does that mean you major in watercolor painting?
I major in print making. Like Chinese woodblock printing. I like woodblock and lithography the best.
Where have you traveled in China?
West China, a little bit Sichuan, Suzhou, Henan, and Shanghai. I guess I like Shanghai the most--all the contemporary, modern buildings. I think it is amazing.
Like Suzhou, it has one foot in the old and one foot in the new. There is a Buddhist temple in walking distance from here which is very old, and from there you can take the subway to SIP or SND, to see the new within an hour. It is amazing.
How many paintings will be exhibited this time?
About 17 paintings.
Were these paintings all painted in China?
Most of them were painted in China, but some were painted in Myanmar and Nepal. The cover of the catalog was painted in Nepal. It is an oil painting. I dressed in local clothes. I picked up some recent paintings for the exhibition.
How often do you paint?
It depends from week to week. But with a good painting week, I can paint maybe three or four days a week, at least two hours per day.
What stimulate you to pick up your brash? How do you pick what to paint?
I think I want to paint the emotion of wonder. When you see something new, you are surprised, something magic happens in your emotional experience. The open moment when you go, when you see something new, you have an experience that opens you.
When you go to a new place, being a traveler, what strikes you the most? It can be everything. Here I have a painting of a street cleaner. For me it is very interesting. For someone living in China, it's something you see everyday. But for a traveler, it is new. It’s surprising. I saw this street cleaner in Suzhou. He reminds me a garuda. It is Nepal legendary bird. To me, the broom in the back in my eyes looked like the bird feathers, the little cart like its body. So the street cleaner seemed like riding on the magical bird, like a god.
I think the continuity of culture is very important. It informs us a type of pleasure and joy that we are part of something that is larger than going to work everyday. We are part of this enormous human continuity. We really share it. As a traveler you get to share this experience with other people of different cultures.
What is the theme of the exhibition?
Intimation means ‘suggestion’, ‘hints’. Like what we’ve been talking about, looking at a painting of the Chinese street sweeper or a temple, it hints the experience of wonder.
With every single painting my intention is to express the open experience of wonder at having a new experience, experiencing something new as a traveler. With each specific painting, whatever it is, in that moment with that experience. So seeing that street sweeper riding on the three-wheel cart, I said, ‘wow, it looks like a garuda.’ Just having that experience of, when you see something, that feeling two cultures mixing in one image.
I think for a lot of times the reflection of water. Here’s a Chinese temple on Chinese New Year’s Eve. I painted a special place at a special moment about it. Here they have the incense burn. So there was the smell of the incense, the sound of chanting, the ceremony going on inside, as we walked toward it, there was a beautiful reflection. We saw the temple reflected in the water. I just want to capture that moment.
So the exhibition is still a bit private, about yourself, about recording what you feel?
Definitely. But I really hope to communicate about that. So when a person walks away from that experience with what image where something of the open experience of wonder is transmitted to them. If that is communicated, I’d feel very happy with people’s responses to it.
Who you expected to be the audience of your exhibition?
Local people. Kunshan local people.
What about the books you wrote?
I want to combine both travel writing and travel painting. I’ve written a book on world mythology. Studying culture, I look at culture. Not just at the surface level, but at deep cultural level. What the stories that people are shaped by. What the stories that we live with.
In China, for example, the “Journey to the West”, and San Guo (the “Romance of the Three Kingdoms”), are stories that inform people’s lives. There is a friend of mine. She’s a young Chinese business woman. She has an English school. San Guo is part of who she is. The stories in San Guo are all about being smart. How to outsmart the component. That’s who she is as business woman. Not she’s competing with people, but to operate business, one has to be a smart person. And I think the Monkey King is the same. I think that is a very lovely part of Chinese culture.
Touching some of that is important to me. Putting these together, I wrote an article about temples for Suzhou Review. A traveler or a local person may see it everyday, but not really understand it. Is it a Buddhist temple or a Confucius temple or a Taoist temple? So I wrote the article so that people’s mind can go beyond to the next level down, and say ‘that’s a Confucius temple, I know what that is.’ There is a type of history and culture associate with the building.
Will mythology help you understand local people of a new place you travel?
Yes. I do it everywhere I go. I read local people’s history, mythology, religious literature. I went to Sri Lanka two years ago. I read a book, I forgot the name of it, but it’s like a history of Sri Lanka from a Buddhist perspective. So when I was there, it was what I read before going sleep. It gave me a stronger impression about the whole island and the whole cultural experience.
The feeling of identity that we carry with us comes from this long continuity of culture, history, and mythology.
Is there any legendary story that helped you to understand Suzhou people?
I haven’t thought about that. About Suzhou people, not so much about mythology but I think of history. I think people are certainly being more soft spoken and more polite. There is a care for aesthetics that Suzhou people have that I haven’t discovered maybe anywhere else in China. I think in China, Suzhouren have the care for the Chinese ink paintings, for the Chinese gardens, and for ‘cha dao’ (tea ceremony). There is a sense of cultural continuity that relates to Chinese arts, and Chinese aesthetics that is alive in Suzhou. I think that comes from the Ming and Qing democratization of arts. So the arts were not only for the aristocrats, but as a general, as military people began to get more money in the Ming Dynasty, they set up little homes in Suzhou, set up gardens, and started to learn painting, and all studied music. I think that were very alive in Suzhou. It is one of the things that make Suzhou very unique. I see it also very much in Hangzhou—in Hangzhou and Suzhou are both very strong—but I think that in Suzhou is stronger now. I heard some people from manufacturing say that they find competing with Hangzhou people very difficult, because Hangzhouren want the cheapest quality with cheapest materials, but they can make good money from it. But Suzhouren feel reservation about making something cheap. They want to make something quality. So some of that sense of aesthetic sensibility has been kept alive from the continuity of Suzhou history.
Do you often embed local mythology into your painting about a certain place?
Not always but it’s there. For example, the ‘nian’, the New Year, story. The New Year is coming up. In China there is the story about the ‘nian’. Nian is a legendary monster that eats people. But what is the ‘nian’. This is how mythology works. It’s metaphorical type of language. Nian is time. What eats people. Time eats people. Every year the ‘year’ eats someone. The nian monster has some feast. We are all sadder because that feast. So every year we can say we escaped the year.
Full article here:
https://mp.weixin.qq.com/s/ZIe8VTS5YpnUCL94IGbkig
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New Years Eve EVE... December 30th. Exhibition opening, print and catalogue signing. INTIMATIONS exhibit. Travel Art. Isn't that all we really see... intimations and suggestions that we do our best to make sense of? We build stories and life narratives around this exuberant light show flashing in front of our eyes. The paintings in this show attempt to trace the edge of that interaction.
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