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Robby Bowles
63,336 followers -
A Scientist at the University of Utah with a passion for photography and imaging.
A Scientist at the University of Utah with a passion for photography and imaging.

63,336 followers
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Delicate Arch

It has been quite awhile since a shared a photo, or anything, to google+.  I have been busy setting up my laboratory over the last year, but wanted to return to posting here on Google+.  My move to Utah has been fantastic and provided numerous opportunities for photography.  Here is a photo of an iconic Utah scene in Arches National Park.

I have also started an instagram account (utahwayoflife) recently where I will also be sharing my photography and Utah adventures.

#landscapephotography  
#utah   #HDR  
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Carry The One Radio: Tapping into the Brains Avoidance Centers.

Make sure to check out +ScienceSunday's content partner, Carry the One Radio,and their  most recent episode interviewing Dr. Garret Stuber from UNC - Chapel Hill.

Some good stuff in this interview on dopamine and avoidance.

#ScienceSunday  
Carry The One Radio:  Tapping Into the Brains Avoidance Centers
#ScienceSunday  

Check out +ScienceSunday's content partner, Carry the One Radio, and their new episode with Dr. Garret Stuber at UNC, Chapel Hill.

http://carrytheoneradio.com/episode/2014-02-01

The What - Traditionally, dopamine is known to transmit reward signals (food, sex, etc.) in the brain and promote behaviors that lead to that reward again. What you may not know, however, is that the area of the brain that releases dopamine, the ventral midbrain, also receives signals of aversion (things we find unpleasant or even dangerous) from a far-off brain region called the lateral habenula. These avoidance signals promote behaviors that lead us to avoid unpleasant or dangerous things in the world.

The Lab - These brain circuits are necessary for survival and are the focus of Dr. Garret Stuber and his laboratory at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill. Using a tool known as optogenetics, Dr. Stuber can excite specific populations of neurons within mouse brains and observe their effects on behavior. For example, by stimulating the neurons in the lateral habenula that signal aversion, he can cause mice to avoid the location in which they received that stimulation. He is essentially creating an aversive stimulus by stimulating the neurons that would normally respond to harmful or unpleasant cues in the world.

Why? - His work has important implications in addiction and psychiatric disorders

The episode can be found here:
http://carrytheoneradio.com/episode/2014-02-01

#ScienceSunday   #SciSunRDB  
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The Unexpected.

While out photographing Snowy Owls on Amherst Island this year, this hawk decided to get pretty close to me.  I always attempt to maintain my distance from the wildlife I photograph out of respect for them.  This hawk was not concerned about me and landed quite close to me.  I was appreciative of the great opportunity to get a close shot to this beautiful hawk.  You never know what to expect each day you go out to shoot, but I always enjoy it.  All in all, it was a great day of photography.

Cheers everyone.

Prints of this shot and other wildlife photographs available on my website at  http://www.robbybowles.com/Art/Wild

#WildlifeWednesday  (+Mike Spinak +Morkel Erasmus)
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Science in Action

I thought it would be fun to start snapping some photos of the science I'm doing on a daily basis. There are often cool visuals that we see everyday that you would never see unless you worked in a lab. This is a photo of our centrifuge as we purify plasmid for a lentiviral gene delivery experiment.

#ScienceEveryday
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Finally.

Happy New Year Everyone!

I have been hoping to photograph Snowy Owls for a few years now, but have come up empty.  This was finally the year and I was able to find a number of them over my Christmas vacation and get a few photos.  They are truly magnificent and it was special to see them in the wild.  I had as much fun observing them as I did photographing them.  I look forward to my next encounter with them, but for now will have to enjoy the photos I took of them.

You can find more of my wildlife photography and prints for purchase on my website at http://www.robbybowles.com/Art/Wild

#WildlifeWednesday  (+Mike Spinak +Morkel Erasmus)
#widewednesdaypanorama  (+WideWednesdayPanorama +Ken McMahon +David Heath Williams)
#WinterWednesday  (+Antoine Berger +Logan Miller)
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Solar Eruption.

May Your New Year be Filled with Science!

+Science Exchange shares one of the coolest science gifs of 2013.  This gif was produced from a video by NASA, which can be seen here: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sdo/news/coronal-rain.html

NASA states:

"On July 19, 2012, an eruption occurred on the sun that produced a moderately powerful solar flare and a dazzling magnetic display known as coronal rain. Hot plasma in the corona cooled and condensed along strong magnetic fields in the region. Magnetic fields, are invisible, but the charged plasma is forced to move along the lines, showing up brightly in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength of 304 Angstroms, and outlining the fields as it slowly falls back to the solar surface. Music: "Thunderbolt" by Lars Leonhard, courtesy of artist. Credit: NASA/SDO/Goddard Scientific Visualization Studio"

#ScienceEveryday  
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Home Sweet Lab

Always nice when you get views like this from your lab window in the evening.

#ScienceEveryday #MyLab
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Carry the One Radio: Pulling DNA.

Check out the most recent edition of Carry the One Radio (content partner with +ScienceSunday) on Sophie Dumont's work at UCSF. Her lab is working to understand how the chromosome (an organized structure of DNA) is divided and segregated into separate daughter cells. 

You can find the interview here: http://www.carrytheoneradio.com/episode/2013-12-01

#ScienceSunday  
Carry the One Radio: Pulling DNA.

We bring you the newest interview by Carry the One Radio (brought to you by +Sama Ahmed) of Sophie Dumont at the University of California, San Francisco.

Find the episode here: http://www.carrytheoneradio.com/episode/2013-12-01

The Process - When a cell divides (called a parent cell), it provides a complete copy of genes to each new cell that is formed (called daughter cells). This complicated process occurs repeatedly to accomplish an organism's development, repair, and replenishment. To reliably split the DNA correctly requires an orchestra of microscopic interactions among many molecules.

The Mechanics - While we know many of the molecules involved, scientists still know relatively little about the mechanical interactions that underlie this process. Our guest this month, Sophie Dumont, Assistant Professor in the Department of Cell and Tissue Biology at UCSF, hopes to understand these interactions. Specifically, her lab is working to understand how the chromosome (an organized structure of DNA) is divided and segregated into separate daughter cells.

The Implications - Her work has implications in various developmental disorders and cancer, which can result from errors in cell division. At the end of our talk she discusses what it’s like to be a woman in science and gives advice to listeners interested in a career in science.

#ScienceSunday   #SciSunRDB  
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Father of the Year?

Check out this fun #ScienceSunday  post from +Rich Pollett showing tadpoles moving around in the male Darwin's frog vocal pouch as they develop!  

As a new father, it's incredible to see how other species have evolved to nurture their offspring.

Update - Unfortunately, +Tommy Leung has pointed out that this species is likely extinct.  Check out Tommy's post on the subject here: https://plus.google.com/u/0/111479647230213565874/posts/43hNoKLxQPW

#ScienceSunday   

Look at this GIF of tadpoles wriggling around in their dad’s mouth 

A male Darwin’s frog with a vocal pouch full of tadpoles. He carries them around until they develop into froglets and hop out of his mouth. (Natural World - BBC)

Darwin's frog: http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/life/Darwin's_Frog

Darwin's frog: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darwin's_frog

ZSLEDGETV video> Movement of tadpoles within vocal sacs of Darwin's frogs

#sciencesunday  
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Seriously?

A Mantis eating a fish!  One of my favorite +ScienceSunday posts this week.  Make sure to join us each week for #ScienceSunday  and during the weekdays for #ScienceEveryday .

#ScienceEveryday  
Mantis Eating a Fish

This really has to be seen to be believed. A mantis (probably a very hungry one) pounces on and eats an actual fish. Although, given that they are capable of eating birds, it's not altogether too surprising. 

Praying Mantis vs Hummingbird

Learn more about mantises here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mantis

#ScienceSunday     #SciSunBS  

h/t +Michael Habib 
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