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Kurt Cagle
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Aaron,

Thanks for the corrections. I had first been introduced to rich snippets from an SEO acquaintance of mine, who used the smart snippet nomenclature, so that's what I thought they were called.

As to the issues of RDFa and microformats. MFs provide some semantics, but in general the convention for converting them into RDF has always been limited. RDFa is a different case, of course. I've been a big proponent of RDFa from very early on, but in general adoption has been quite limited, both because good RDFa is remarkably difficult to write, and because it required a fairly extensive understanding of how RDF itself worked.

The use of JSON-LD has only really been prevalent through Google for about the last year, but it does provide a mechanism that makes it possible to create complex sets of triples via a compact notation. As such, these rich snippets are a decent (not great, but workable) implementation. Personally, I wish that I could write Turtle in a <meta> or <script> element, but I'm not going to hold my breath on that one.
"Communication can only take place when a common language exists"

Compelling article from +Kurt Cagle in +Forbes that discusses the importance of schema.org, and how the knowledge graph it helps create "fulfills one of the basic visions of the Semantic Web".

My only beef with this fine article is Cagle's coining of the phrase "smart snippet" which isn't, you know, a thing. Emphasis mine.

"Beginning in 2017, both Google and Bing (Microsoft's search engine) announced that they would be supporting the use of embedded smart snippets in web content. A smart snippet is a bit of JSON (and common web standard for data interchange) that uses schema.org tags to identify what a web page contains. Google (and likely all other major search engines) would read the snippet and create a much more comprehensive record about that page than is done now for SEO searching. Smart snippets would have greater weight in search algorithms, and because such snippets could in fact be fairly complex, it would be possible to describe individual resources within these snippets in machine readable ways."

From a nomenclature perspective "smart snippet" is potentially confusing because of its linguistic association with the long-standing name for a structured data enhanced search feature, a "rich snippet" (now a "rich result" in
Google parlance, but the term "rich snippet" is still widely used). And that Cagle is referring to the mechanism that provides structured data to crawlers rather than the appearance of such a page makes the phrasing that much more unfortunate.

More egregiously is that this paragraph starts with the sentence "Beginning in 2017, both Google and Bing (Microsoft's search engine) announced that they would be supporting the use of embedded smart snippets in web content." This is factually incorrect no matter how you interpret this sentence.

Google and Bing have, of course, been supporting schema.org markup for many years prior to 2017. Cagle seems to be referring to an "embedded smart snippets" as JSON-LD-provided markup, but I'd certainly argue that schema.org data provided in RDFa and microdata also qualifies as "embedded smart snippets". Even is Cagle is being more restrictive in this, referring only to JSON-LD, it'd be easy to see how a casual reader would come away with the impression that search engines only started using this data in 2017.

And if by "embedded smart snippet" Cagle means only JSON-LD? Then this too is incorrect, as Google's support for JSON-LD extends at least back to 2015 (http://bit.ly/1GaxKSY), whereas Bing only started supporting JSON-LD in 2018 (http://bit.ly/2nfox5r).

The hopefully-soon-to-be-retired phrase "smart snippet" aside, however, a thoughtful article that puts schema.org in a broader context than the often narrower SEO lens on the vocabulary.

#schemaorg #jsonld #semanticweb
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Some thoughts about how organizations learn from the experiences of its employees.
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The problem with data metaphors is that they are all wet. 
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Making documenting Javascript just a wee bit less onerous.
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There are many good reasons to write a book
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Driverless cars are coming, but it will be an evolution, not a revolution.
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I've been thinking a lot about this. Programming should be a passion, not a requirement.
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This was a fun conference, but more importantly, it was I think a breakout conference showcasing the increasing maturity and sophistication of the MarkLogic 8 Server.
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