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Granite State Physical Therapy
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Elbow injuries of the ulnar collateral ligament don't require surgery: The number of surgeries for these injuries is increasing significantly at all levels of play The ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) is a band of tissue that connects the inside of the upper arm bone to the inside of the forearm at the elbow. It helps to support and stabilize the arm during movements like throwing a ball, but is commonly injured in sports that require lots of overhead motions, particularly baseball. In fact, UCL injuries are often considered the most prevalent overuse injury in baseball, meaning it results from too much time throwing without enough rest. The number of UCL injuries in baseball has been steadily increasing in recent years, and along with it, so has the rate of surgeries to address them. This is true on all levels of play, as the incidence of UCL reconstruction (surgery for UCL injuries) is increasing in the major leagues and down to the level of 15-19-year-olds. However, it's important to point out that the majority of injuries to the UCL do not actually require surgery. Research has shown that 84% of professional baseball players with partial UCL tears have been able to successfully return to play after completing non-surgical treatment like physical therapy, yet many players continue to have surgery. For this reason, a review was published to explain why non-surgical treatment should be used for most UCL injuries and what can be done to ensure a safe return to baseball. Players should be carefully examined to confirm the UCL injury After a baseball player is injured, an athletic trainer, physical therapist or some other medical professional must examine him to diagnose the problem. Common symptoms of a UCL injury include swelling, tenderness, loss of throwing speed or control, and pain in the middle of the elbow that is particularly strong while throwing. UCL tears usually develop gradually over time and are noticed by a gradual decline in the ability to throw, although some players experience them suddenly during play with a "popping" sensation. If a UCL injury is suspected, an imaging test like an X-ray, MRI or ultrasound is often needed to confirm it. Non-surgical rehabilitation usually broken down into three phases Most experts recommend that non-surgical care should be used at first to treat most UCL injuries. Non-surgical rehabilitation of these injuries is usually guided by a course of physical therapy and broken down into three phases. The goals of phase 1 are to reduce pain and restore pain-free elbow and shoulder motion through a variety of strengthening exercises. Once the patient can perform certain movements with no pain and minimal tenderness, they may progress to phase 2, in which the goals are to normalize strength and to start performing sport-specific activities. In this phase, the intensity of the strengthening exercises should be increased and patients should begin preparing for throwing again with medicine ball exercises. Finally, phase 3 is the return-to-sport phase, which can begin once the patient has a satisfactory exam, usually after about six weeks. The central part of phase 3 is a return-to-sport interval-throwing program (ITP), in which players are instructed on how to throw and pitch properly in order to avoid future injuries, which may last several weeks. This should also be accompanied with the physical therapist identifying any other factors that may increase the risk for injury-such as pitching too many fastballs, pitching through pain and not taking enough time off each year-and offering advice on how to address them. If all of these components are followed, most patients with UCL injuries can expect to recover safely and return to baseball at a similar level as before the injury. Baseball players with these injuries are therefore encouraged to visit a physical therapist for an evaluation and treatment recommendations before considering surgery. -As reported in the September '17 issue of The Physician and Sportsmedicine http://dlvr.it/QnTKzy
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What are the most common injuries in field hockey? #SeeApt1st: What are the most common injuries in field hockey? How can you prevent them? #SeeAPT1st Click Here for the Article http://dlvr.it/Qn52Xr
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Hands-on movement by PT have a positive effect on tennis elbow: Lateral epicondylitis, often referred to as tennis elbow, is a painful condition that results from overuse. It occurs when the tendons that connect the muscles of the forearm to the outside of the elbow become damaged and inflamed, which leads to pain or a burning sensation in this region. Tennis elbow is-unsurprisingly-most common in tennis players, but can also affect other athletes and anyone who repeatedly performs movements that involve the elbow. Most patients with tennis elbow are treated conservatively (non-surgically) at first with various interventions that are often part of a treatment plan designed by a physical therapist. Although many of these interventions have been studied, most reviews focus on several of them being used at once, which makes it difficult to determine the effectiveness of each one individually. For example, the effectiveness of joint mobilization-a technique in which the therapist moves the elbow in a number of specific ways-has not yet been evaluated in a comprehensive manner. Therefore, a powerful pair of studies called a systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to determine if joint mobilizations are effective for improving pain, grip strength and disability for patients with tennis elbow. Three medical databases are searched for relevant studies Researchers performed a search of three major medical databases for studies that investigated the use of any type of joint mobilizations being used to treat adult patients with tennis elbow. A total of 257 articles were originally identified and assessed to determine if they were eligible, of these 20 met the necessary criteria and were accepted into the study. Once these studies were identified, researchers analyzed their findings and compared them to one another with the goal of finding trends about joint mobilizations. The quality of each study was also assessed so that a consensus could be made as to how reliable their findings were. High-quality evidence shows that two types of joint mobilization are beneficial Overall, results were supportive of the effectiveness of joint mobilizations for tennis elbow. In particular, high-quality evidence was found that showed two types of joint mobilization-mobilization with movement (MWM) and Mill's manipulation-were more beneficial than comparison groups for improving pain in the short term and intermediate term. There was also strong evidence that MWM is more beneficial than no treatment at improving grip strength in the short term. MWM consists of a technique in which the therapist glides the forearm while securing the shoulder with the other hand, during which the patient simultaneously performs a pain-free gripping action. In Mill's manipulation, the therapist performs a maneuver that quickly stretches out the painful tissue from tennis elbow with a thrust mechanism. Based on these findings, researchers felt confident recommending either MWM or Mill's manipulation for a moderate-sized positive effect on pain and grip strength. Patients with symptoms that suggest tennis elbow may therefore want to consider seeing a physical therapist for their condition, since they can provide these types of mobilizations and other techniques that will help them improve in the fastest and safest manner possible. -As reported in the April '18 issue of the Journal of Hand Therapy http://dlvr.it/QmlQKy
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Motivational Monday: -Earl Nightingdale http://dlvr.it/QmdZQS
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Recipe Wednesday - Whole-Wheat Bow Tie Pasta With Puttanesca Sauce: Capers, anchovies, and olives! Oh my! Click here for this great recipe! http://dlvr.it/Qm7sdk
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October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month http://dlvr.it/Qlvxww
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6 Common Cycling Injuries.: 6 Common Cycling Injuries. #SeeAPT1st Click Here for the Article http://dlvr.it/QldMwl
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Motivational Monday: -John Neal http://dlvr.it/Ql9lzk
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Fall Equinox Today http://dlvr.it/Ql0r1B
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Recipe Wednesday - Red Snapper Provencal: Sounds yummy! Click here for the recipe! http://dlvr.it/Qkfgdj
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