Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Montana Skin Cancer and Dermatology Center
33 followers
33 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment

Vitiligo (vit-uh-lie-go) causes the skin to lose color. Patches of lighter skin appear. Some people develop a few patches. Others lose much more skin color.
 
Vitiligo usually affects the skin, but it can develop anywhere we have pigment. Patches of hair can turn white. Some people lose color inside their mouths. Even an eye can lose some of its color.

Learn more about vitiligo... https://www.aad.org/dermatology-a-to-z/diseases-and-treatments/u---w/vitiligo
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Weekly Dermatology Lesson | EXCESSIVE SWEATING (Hyperhidrosis)

Excessive sweating happens when a person sweats more than is necessary. Yes, it’s necessary to sweat. Sweating cools the body, which prevents us from overheating. People who have hyperhidrosis, however, sweat when the body does not need cooling.

What is hyperhidrosis? https://www.aad.org/dermatology-a-to-z/diseases-and-treatments/e---h/hyperhidrosis

Tips for managing hyperhidrosis - https://www.aad.org/dermatology-a-to-z/diseases-and-treatments/e---h/hyperhidrosis/hyperhidrosis-tips-for-managing
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Weekly Dermatology Lesson  |  Skier / Boarder Sun Protection

If you’re hitting the slopes this weekend, here are some sun protection tips from professional skier Julia Mancuso: http://ow.ly/H0OdP
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Weekly Dermatology Lesson  |  PREVENTING FROSTBITE

With much of the country experiencing below freezing temperatures, keep these tips in mind to prevent frostbite when outdoors: http://ow.ly/GWPUz
Info from the American Academy of Dermatology
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Weekly Dermatology Lesson  |  MELANOMA

Melanoma is a type of skin cancer. Anyone can get melanoma. When found early and treated, the cure rate is nearly 100%.

Dermatologists believe that the number of deaths from melanoma would be much lower if people:
◾Knew the warning signs of melanoma.
◾Learned how to examine their skin for signs of skin cancer.
◾Took the time to examine their skin.
 
It’s important to take time to look at the moles on your skin because this is a good way to find melanoma early. When checking your skin, you should look for the ABCDEs of melanoma.

More people getting melanoma.
Fewer people are getting most types of cancer. Melanoma is different. More people are getting melanoma. Many are white men who are 50 years or older. More young people also are getting melanoma. Melanoma is now the most common cancer among people 25-29 years old. Even teenagers are getting melanoma.

What causes melanoma?
Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a major contributor in most cases. We get UV radiation from the sun, tanning beds, and sun lamps. Heredity also plays a role. Research shows that if a close blood relative (parent, child, sibling, aunt, uncle) had melanoma, a person has a much greater risk of getting melanoma.
Skin Cancer Diagnosis:
If you notice a suspicious change on your skin, it's important to see a dermatologist for a skin cancer screening as soon as possible. Examining your skin on a monthly basis is the best way to catch skin cancer as early as possible. Pay attention to any changes. Get to know the pattern of your moles, scars, spots, freckles, and other marks on your skin so you can detect any changes. Early diagnosis and treatment increase your chances of curing the cancer.
The most common way to diagnose skin cancer is through a biopsy. The dermatologist will numb the area, then remove all or a portion of the suspicious area. The tissue is usually sent to a lab to be examined under a microscope by a dermatopathologist. Your doctor will want to know when you first noticed the change in your skin, your symptoms, and your history of sun exposure.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Weekly Dermatology Lesson  |  SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA

Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a common skin cancer in humans. About 700,000 new cases of this skin cancer are diagnosed in the United States each year.

This skin cancer tends to develop on skin that has been exposed to the sun for years. It is most frequently seen on sun-exposed areas, such as the head, neck, and back of the hands. Women frequently get SCC on their lower legs.

It is possible to get SCC on any part of the body, including the inside of the mouth, lips, and genitals.

People who use tanning beds have a much higher risk of getting SCC. They also tend to get SCC earlier in life.
SCC can spread to other parts of the body. With early diagnosis and treatment, SCC is highly curable. 

Skin Cancer Diagnosis:
 If you notice a suspicious change on your skin, it's important to see a dermatologist for a skin cancer screening as soon as possible. Examining your skin on a monthly basis is the best way to catch skin cancer as early as possible. Pay attention to any changes. Get to know the pattern of your moles, scars, spots, freckles, and other marks on your skin so you can detect any changes. Early diagnosis and treatment increase your chances of curing the cancer.

 The most common way to diagnose skin cancer is through a biopsy. The dermatologist will numb the area, then remove all or a portion of the suspicious area. The tissue is usually sent to a lab to be examined under a microscope by a dermatopathologist. Your doctor will want to know when you first noticed the change in your skin, your symptoms, and your history of sun exposure.
PhotoPhotoPhoto
2014-12-22
3 Photos - View album
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Last minute Christmas gift idea ... Sunscreen

Looking for a useful, thoughtful stocking stuffer or gift? Elta MD Skin Care offer a great line of Sun Care products. We sell Elta MD products in our office (just stop in, no need to be a patient). Help reduce and prevent photoaging, sun damage and skin cancer.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Weekly Dermatology Lesson | BASAL CELL CARCINOMA

These images show some of the many faces of basal cell carcinoma. They often start as small, painless, pink or flesh-colored pearly bumps. If they are neglected, they continue to grow, expanding both deeper and more broadly. While BCC does not tend to spread to other parts of the body, they can be locally destructive, effectively invading any tissue in its immediate path.

Skin Cancer Diagnosis:
If you notice a suspicious change on your skin, it's important to see a dermatologist for a skin cancer screening as soon as possible. Examining your skin on a monthly basis is the best way to catch skin cancer as early as possible. Pay attention to any changes. Get to know the pattern of your moles, scars, spots, freckles, and other marks on your skin so you can detect any changes. Early diagnosis and treatment increase your chances of curing the cancer.
The most common way to diagnose skin cancer is through a biopsy. The dermatologist will numb the area, then remove all or a portion of the suspicious area. The tissue is usually sent to a lab to be examined under a microscope by a dermatopathologist. Your doctor will want to know when you first noticed the change in your skin, your symptoms, and your history of sun exposure.
PhotoPhotoPhotoPhotoPhoto
2014-12-17
5 Photos - View album
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
CONGRATS! CDT's
Congratulations to our Medical and Surgical Assistants in completion of the "Association of Dermatology Techs" program! Your are now CDT's (Certified Dermatology Techs)! Our goal in the completion of this program is to provide advanced education that results in exceptional care for our patients and our community.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Weekly Dermatology Lesson  |  HOW YOUR SKIN GROWS

Your skin grows really fast. Here are some cool facts about your skin and how it grows:
You have a ton of skin cells. There are about 19 million skin cells in every inch of your body.
New skin cells replace old ones. Your body is always making new skin cells and getting rid of old ones. Your body gets rid of 30,000 to 40,000 old skin cells every day! The skin you see now will be gone in about a month.
Dead skin cells are on top. The top 18 to 23 layers of your skin are made of dead cells.
New skin cells form at the bottom of the epidermis, which is the top part of your skin.
Skin cells change shape. They start off kind of fat and square. Over time, they move to the top of the epidermis, flattening out as they go. When they get to the top, they flake off.
In 1 inch of skin, you have about:
650 sweat glands.
20 blood vessels.
60,000 melanocytes (the stuff that makes melanin and gives your skin its color.)
1,000 or more nerve endings.
Wow!
Photo
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded