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Prof. David A. Weitz, Harvard University

This talk will discuss the use of microfluidic devices to precisely control the flow and mixing of fluids to make drops, and will explore a variety of uses of these drops. These drops can be used to create new materials that are difficult to synthesize with any other method. These materials have great potential for use for encapsulation and release and for drug delivery and for cosmetics. I will also show how the exquisite control afforded by microfluidic devices provides enabling technology to use droplets as microreactors to perform reactions at remarkably high rates using very small quantities of fluids.

The Wulff Lecture is an introductory, general audience, entertaining lecture which serves to educate, inspire, and encourage MIT undergraduates to take up study of materials science and engineering and related fields. The entire MIT community, particularly freshmen, is invited to attend. The Wulff Lecture honors the late Professor John Wulff, a skilled, provocative, and entertaining teacher who conceived of a new approach to teaching general chemistry and inaugurated the popular freshman subject, 3.091 Introduction to Solid-State Chemistry.
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Speaker: Prof. Michal Lipson, Cornell University

The tool box of integrated nanophotonics is rich: from the ability to guide and amplify multiple wavelength sources at GHz bandwidths, to optomechanical MEMS and opto-fluidics devices. Using highly confined photonic structures, much smaller than the wavelength of light, we demonstrated ultra-compact passive and active silicon photonic components that enhance the electro-optical, mechanical and non-linear properties of the material. I provide an overview of recent advances and challenges in the field. As an example of silicon photonics capabilities, I describe ultrahigh speed devices that enable one to dynamically modulate the structure's optical properties on the same time scale as the photon time of flight, leading to unique applications such as optical isolators on a silicon chip. 

Prof. Lipson has B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in physics in the Technion - Israel Institute of Technology. Her research involves novel on-chip nanophotonic devices. She is the inventor of over 15 patents regarding novel micron-size photonic structures for light manipulation. She is coauthor of more than 200 patents regarding novel micron-size photonic structures for light manipulation. She is coauthor of over 200 papers in physics and optics. Dr. Lipson is a MacArthur Fellow, an IEEE Fellow, and a Fellow of the Optical Society of America. She has received the NSF CAREER, IBM Faculty, and Blavatnik Awards.
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Professor Darrell Irvine and his collaborators have recently published research on a new vaccine technology that could help fight cancer and HIV. The story is on the MIT homepage today!
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Check out the foundry on the MIT homepage today!
They're spotlighting this video made by the MIT News Office
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I wish I had that in my faculty. 
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Check out this Forbes list of 30 under 30 in Energy and Industry— David Cohen-Tanugi and Sophie Ni are both DMSE students!  We are so proud of them.
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G.A. Botton
Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering,
Canadian Centre for Electron Microscopy,
Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research,
McMaster University

Electron energy loss spectroscopy is an invaluable technique to study the detailed structure and the chemical state of materials at unprecedented spatial resolution. In today’s modern electron microscopes, it is possible to tackle problems requiring the highest energy resolution, down to 60meV, and highest spatial resolution, down to the angstrom level, so that atomic resolved spectroscopy with high spectroscopic sensitivity and resolution can be obtained. This leads to the potential of covering excitation phenomena from the mid-infrared, soft-X-rays and even hard-X-ray regime.

In this presentation, various examples of applications of electron microscopy will be given based an ultrastable double aberration-corrected and monochromated electron microscope. First of all, the detection of low-loss features in plasmonic nanostructures and nanoantennas, down to the mid-infrared part of the electron energy loss spectrum will be given, and this by directly imaging resonances down to 0.17eV, the lowest features currently detected with EELS [1,2]. After an overview of the imaging conditions used to detect core-shell ordering changes in PtFe, PtRu, PtAu alloy nanoparticles [3] and graphene [4] used for fuel cell catalysts, using a combination of high-angle annular dark-field STEM imaging, EELS elemental mapping and simulations, we will discuss the application of atomic-resolved EELS mapping in the study of interfaces in quantum material that exhibit orbital ordering and in high-temperature superconductors. From the energy loss near edge structures, it is clearly demonstrated that symmetry breaking can be resolved within two monolayers from a buried interface and that valence can be deduced at the atomic level. This powerful technique can also be used to study of the structure and substitutional effects from single atom dopants in phosphors and metallic alloys.

Additional examples will highlight the application of microscopy technique to the analysis of perovskite structures. These examples demonstrate that compositional and chemical state (valence and coordination) information can be obtained down to the Ångstrom level on surfaces [5].

[1] D. Rossouw, et al., Nano Letters 11, 1499-1504 (2011),

[2] D. Rossouw, G.A. Botton, Phys. Rev. Letters 110, 066801 (2013)

[3] S. Prabhudev et al., ACS Nano 7, 6103-6110,  (2013)

[4] S. Stambula et al., Journal of Physical Chemistry C, on-line (2014), DOI: 10.1021/jp408979h

[5] G.-Z. Zhu, G. Radtke, G.A. Botton, Nature, 490, 384, (2012)

The Materials Science and Engineering Seminar is jointly sponsored by CMSE, DMSE, and MPC.  Please join us!
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William A. Curtin, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne

Low ductility in Al alloys is a major barrier to their replacement of steels in automotive and other applications where failure by localization limits component design.  Low ductility in Al-Mg alloys has long been associated with Dynamic Strain Aging – the material is stronger at lower strain rates, which encourages localization and instabilities – but no quantitative or predictive models exist.  Here, we present a hierarchical, mechanistic, multiscale model that quantitatively predicts the ductility and enables the design of new higher-ductility alloys.  The components of the model, all new to the metallurgy field, are:

(1) first-principles solute/dislocation interaction energies for arbitrary solutes in Al;

(2) predictive theory for solute strengthening in the absence of aging mechanisms;

(3) atomic-scale “cross-core diffusion” mechanism of aging;

(4) effects of cross-core diffusion on two mechanisms of dislocation strengthening; 

(5) full thermo-kinetic constitutive model for thermally-activated plastic flow;

(6) implementation with an FEM model to predict coupon-scale response.

The model quantitatively predicts the entire scope of steady-state flow behavior as a function of strain-rate, plastic strain, temperature, and alloy composition in Al-Mg alloys, with all key inputs coming from quantum, atomistic, or dislocation-level computations.  In particular, the predicted reduction in ductility of Al-Mg 5182 alloys at room temperature and strain rate of 10-3/s is predicted in good agreement with experiments, tying the ductility loss directly to atomistic-scale phenomena. The model is then used to design new Al alloy compositions that have higher ductility at room temperature while maintaining the same yield and hardening behavior of the commercial alloys.




The Materials Science and Engineering Seminar is jointly sponsored by CMSE, DMSE, and MPC.  Please join us!
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Great profile of a terrific undergrad!
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Minh Dinh is a double major: Materials Science and Engineering and Nuclear Science and Engineering
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Professor Ceder and his collaborators find that contrary to conventional wisdom, cathodes made of disordered lithium compounds can perform better than perfectly ordered ones.
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See Professor Jeff Grossman explain photovoltaics
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MIT Department of Materials Science and Engineering (DMSE)
Introduction
MIT's Department of Materials Science and Engineering studies all aspects of materials, over the entire materials cycle from mining and refining of raw materials, to production and utilization of finished materials, and finally to disposal and recycling. The research ranges from the purely scientific to applied studies and involves perspectives of chemistry, physics, electronics, the artistic and historical aspects of materials, design, and entrepreneurial ventures. Research done here will change our use of metals, polymers, ceramics, glasses, electronic materials, biomedical materials, composites, and other materials.