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John Payne
Lives in Boulder, Colorado
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Dispatcher for a circulator bus route (The HOP) which operates without a fixed schedule.
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Technical journalism. Programming in Swift for iOS and OSX. Dynamic balancing of distribution of buses in circulator bus route.
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Gender
Male
Other names
My radio handle while working for Transfort, which came to feel like a name, was "five-eleven", I've also used "Sam" as a radio handle, and still answer to it about as quickly as to my own name.
Story
Tagline
They say I learned to run before I learned to walk. I can't dispute this.
Introduction
I was born in Nebraska, raised from the age of three in southern Kansas, moved to Colorado shortly before my twentieth birthday, and have lived here, mainly in Boulder, for most of my adult life. I have long-standing interests in the martial arts (what brought me to Colorado in the first place) and in robotics, having come to this by way of the potential for robotics to radically transform agricultural practice for the better. More recently I've developed an interest in musical scales built from integer ratios of frequencies (Just Intonation), enough so that it drove me to learn to program for iOS, culminating in an iPad app in 2010 (long overdue for an update), and building upon that initial skill-set consumes much of my spare time, although I am now at least as interested in applying it to other things, including robotics.
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Boulder, Colorado
Previously
Fairmont, Nebraska - Freeport, Kansas - Denver, Colorado - Plainfield, Vermont - Boulder, Colorado - Portland, Oregon - Fort Collins, Colorado
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John Payne

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Over the past weeks, I've written two series of posts, the first titled "Biological Agriculture for Roboticists" and the second "Robotics for Gardeners and Farmers", with the intention of helping to bridge the gap between these occupations and those engaged in them. What appears below is a table of contents for those series.
Robotics for Gardening and Farming: A Guide to Two Recent Series Over the past weeks, I've written two series of posts, the first titled "Biological Agriculture for Roboticists" and the second "Robotics for Gardeners and Fa...
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John Payne

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The reason I believe her vision and my own are complementary is that devices using cultivation techniques sufficiently meticulous and noninvasive to enable mechanization of intensive polycultures could also allow some selective wildness (something other than aggressive and/or noxious weeds) back onto land used for production, intermixed with crops grown for harvest.
I first learned about Emma Marris from another video, posted in conjunction with the publication of her book Rambunctious Garden... ...which I have previously linked to here. The reason I believe her vision and my own are...
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John Payne

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This is not meant to be a comprehensive list of resources, far from it, just enough to get you over the hump of having no idea where to start. First, let me quickly mention three sources from which you can get parts and kits, in alphabetical order: Adafruit, RobotShop, and SparkFun. You should also know about Make: and DIY Drones.
This is not meant to be a comprehensive list of resources, far from it, just enough to get you over the hump of having no idea where to start. First, let me quickly mention three sources from which you can get parts and kits...
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Okay, now back down to the bottom of the stack for a look at how computers do what they do. This will be more than you need to know to just use a computer, but when you're wiring up sensors or other hardware to or programming a microcontroller or single board computer it could come in handy.
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“In a previous installment, I said that identifying weeds based on what's left standing after a patch of ground has been grazed won't control low-growing plants, using goatheads as an example.” … “I also promised to get back to the use of sound, in the context of fauna management and pest control. This by itself could easily be the subject of a lengthy book. Information about the environment can be gleaned from ambient sounds as well as from active sonar, and a robot might also emit sounds for the effects they can produce.”
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To be most useful, agricultural robots need not only to be able to distinguish plants from a background of soil and decaying plant matter, but to be able to distinguish them from each other, and to quickly model their branching structures, at least approximately, if only so they can locate the main stem and the point at which it emerges from the soil.
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Have him in circles
170 people
Cia Suprema's profile photo
Matthew McClure's profile photo
Robohub's profile photo
Melisa Vogel's profile photo
Tom Howard's profile photo
ABBA MAHAMAT AHMAT's profile photo
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John Payne

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Imagine you're a newborn tree squirrel, nearly devoid of usable senses, that somehow fell from the nest but survived the fall. Without sensory hardware or some other source of information about its environment, this is essentially the situation faced by any computing device, except that it doesn't experience distress; it just runs code.
Imagine, for a moment, that you are a baby chipmunk, emerging from the burrow for the first time and having your first look around. The world is amazing, full of light and sound, most of which doesn't make much sense at first...
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They call it a ‘farming machine’ and I see no reason it couldn't be scaled up to be that, but at its current scale it's more of a gardening machine, which is fine. The point is that they're using the open source paradigm, wit...
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What follows will begin with a whirlwind tour of topics at or near the bottom of the computing stack (the realm of bits and bytes), in the hope of tying up some loose ends at that level, followed by a few steps upwards, towards the sorts of things that technicians and hobbyists deal with directly.
What follows will begin with a whirlwind tour of topics at or near the bottom of the computing stack (the realm of bits and bytes), in the hope of tying up some loose ends at that level, followed by a few steps upwards, towar...
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John Payne

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Investment follows the perception of a potential market. Without the perception of a market into which to sell the fruits of product development, investment is hard to come by, hence little development happens and few products are forthcoming. To really get behind the application of robotics to horticulture and agriculture, in a manner that takes full advantage of the potential of robotics to leverage the very best practices and make them scalable, investors must be convinced that their money will at least accomplish something worthwhile, and preferably that it will bring them a nice return.
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John Payne

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Start with a seed ball, containing seeds of one or more drought tolerant plants. Next assemble some feathers or vanes, rather like those found on a badminton shuttlecock, but with an adaxial (inner) surface that is both a good radiator of thermal energy and hydrophobic, or having a branching network of hydrophobic veins which converge at the stem end.
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“So how can robotics contribute to agriculture, or, more generally, to land management? Let's start with a relatively simple example, where the robot need not concern itself with differentiating between crops and weeds, and the only required manipulations are of nonliving materials.”
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