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John Payne
170 followers -
They say I learned to run before I learned to walk. I can't dispute this.
They say I learned to run before I learned to walk. I can't dispute this.

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“Without going into detail, what constitutes ‘best practices’ can look very different depending on the goals to be served, but even leaving that aside there's still the issue of ‘best practices’ implying that the matter is already decided.”

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“This is essentially a problem in complex swarm engineering, complex because of the variety of devices involved. Solving it in a way that creates a multi-device platform capable of following rules, carrying out plans, and recognizing anomalous conditions is the all-important first step in enabling the kind of robotics that can then go one to enable scalable regenerative practices in farming (and land management in general).”

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“Together, robotics and regenerative agriculture can do much to drive each other's development, and to improve humankind's prospects for the future. But, of course, the near-term bottom line is that, together, they can make a more compelling case for adequate funding.”

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How technology can help keep farmers relevant

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What's left for farmers to do when machines ‘do it all’?

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Tipping Point, Bottleneck, or Quantum Tunnel between paradigms

I love Malcolm Gladwell, as much as I love any man I've never met in person and to whom I am not closely related, but I wonder about the central metaphor of his book The Tipping Point (published in 2000), although I do think the implication of leaving behind the possibility of going back to the way things were before is altogether accurate.

What for me seems to be missing from this metaphor is the limited capacity of any culture to process change. You might think of it as being analogous to inertia or friction, but I think it might better be characterized in terms of density and pressure.

It's as though we are being forced, by the pressure of innumerable events, into a conical channel with what at present remains a tiny opening at the pointy end, like the nozzle of an acetylene torch, being accelerated into an unpredictable future beyond anyone's control. The effect is rather like an extreme roller coaster, both exciting and terrifying.

Perhaps we should be reaching back 30 years further to the publication of Alvin Toffler's Future Shock to find the other side of the Tipping Point coin, and the explanation for why so many people are so ready to support such regressive public policies.

Afterthought: Perhaps an even more apt metaphor is quantum tunneling, in this case between paradigms. Any individual has some probability of finding themselves in an alternative paradigm at any moment, and should they find a place there they may make the transition to that new paradigm permanent.

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Over the past weeks, I've written two series of posts, the first titled "Biological Agriculture for Roboticists" and the second "Robotics for Gardeners and Farmers", with the intention of helping to bridge the gap between these occupations and those engaged in them. What appears below is a table of contents for those series.

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Imagine you're a newborn tree squirrel, nearly devoid of usable senses, that somehow fell from the nest but survived the fall. Without sensory hardware or some other source of information about its environment, this is essentially the situation faced by any computing device, except that it doesn't experience distress; it just runs code.
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