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Kartik Soni
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First Contracting Human Muscle Grown in Laboratory

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/bioengineering-muscles-neuroscience-1699/.

Researchers at Duke University report the first lab-grown, contracting human muscle, which could revolutionize drug discovery and personalized medicine.

The research in in eLife. (full open access)

Research: “Bioengineered human myobundles mimic clinical responses of skeletal muscle to drugs” by Lauran Madden, Mark Juhas, William E Kraus, George A Truskey, and Nenad Bursac in eLife. doi:10.7554/eLife.04885  (http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04885)

Image: A microscopic view of lab-grown human muscle bundles stained to show patterns made by basic muscle units and their associated proteins (red), which are a hallmark of human muscle. Image adapted from the Duke press release.

#biology   #bioengineering  
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Why are we born...... Young ??
An intriguing question that was
recently asked by one of the scientists at my departmental retreat. Although
simply stated I believe this is a rather important question that would be asked
by several biologists . If you look deeply into the question it has ...

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Turning basic stem cell research into clinical therapies for treating human disease is highly desirable. However, a recent article in the New York Times argues that “enthusiasm for stem cells sometimes outstrips the science…” and discusses some cautionary notes regarding the development of current clinical stem cell-based therapies, and the expectations that come with them: http://ow.ly/Bz2W0

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Researchers Explain How Neural Stem Cells Create New and Varied Neurons

A new study examining the brains of fruit flies reveals a novel stem cell mechanism that may help explain how neurons form in humans. A paper on the study by researchers at the University of Oregon appeared in the online version of the journal Nature in advance of the June 27 publication date.

More at http://bit.ly/12Wa3ec.

The Drosophila neuroblast diagram is credited to Chris Doe.
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Scientists discover stem cells which could treat blindness

University of Southampton researchers have discovered a well of stem cells in a part of the eye called the corneal limbus, and have shown that these cells can be changed into photo-receptor cells with the ability to react to light.

#scientists   hope that the implantation of the cultured stem #cells   into damaged eyes could reverse #blindness   .

This could be a potential cure for the thousands of people suffering from retinitis pigmentosa or macular degeneration, both of which are caused by the loss of photo-receptor cells within the eyes.


https://www.healthnewsuk.co.uk/medical-news/scientists-discover-stem-cells-which-could-treat-blindness/

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Effects of Age on Remyelination are Reversible

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/neurology-remyelination-ms-1392.

Like conducting an errant orchestra to play together, researchers are guiding processes that go awry in multiple sclerosis to repair themselves.

Image: Oligodendrocytes are formed by a type of stem cell in the brain called oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), and are responsible for re-wrapping, or remyelinating, the bare axons with myelin in response to injuries or diseases. This image is for illustrative purposes only and shows and artist’s representation of an oligodendrocyte. Credit Holly Fischer.

#neurology   #multiplesclerosis   #neuroscience  
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Medical first. Embryonic stem cells first foray into major fatal diseases.

In the most rigorous test of embryonic stems cells' potential yet, six people with heart failure will be treated in France with a patch of immature heart cells made from hESCs (human embryonic stem cells), and 40 people with diabetes in the US will receive pouches containing immature pancreatic cells made from hESCs.

The hope is that the heart patch will help to regenerate heart muscle destroyed by heart attacks, while the pancreatic cells are supposed to mature into beta cells, which produce the hormone insulin. These would act as a substitute for the cells that are destroyed by the immune systems of people with type 1 diabetes.

Read more: http://goo.gl/RXfx17
NIH, Stem Cell Basics, http://stemcells.nih.gov/info/basics/pages/basics3.aspx
Image credit stemcellgurus.wordpress.com
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