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Avro Pet Hospital, Your Veterinarian in Vaughan
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Lifestyle Vaccines: What Are They and Which Does Your Pet Need?
Pet vaccines. For most pet owners, they are something we do regularly but don’t think much about. As a veterinarian, however, vaccinations are something I am always thinking about. At the top of my mind is usually this: How can I best protect my patients while minimizing any risk of over-vaccinating or asking clients to spend money unnecessarily?
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5 Ways to Help a Hiding Cat
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Affenpinscher
The Affenpinscher is a wiry-haired terrier-like toy dog. It makes a good house pet due to its intelligence and cordialness towards other animals. The Affenpinscher is distinguished from other terriers by its quality of being good with pets and other dogs. This small dog is at its best with its family, which enjoys humor and entertainment
Some lively indoor games, short walks on a leash or outdoor romps can meet the exercise requirements of the active and energetic Affenpinscher. The dog cannot live outside but loves to play outdoors. The Affenpinscher, which has an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, has a tendency to suffer from minor diseases like patellar luxation and corneal ulcers. Respiratory difficulties, patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), and open fontanel are sometimes seen in this breed as well. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run knee and cardiac tests on the dog.
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Affenpinscher
Affenpinscher
petmd.com
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Vinegar can be safely used for treating many common health issues that affect pets, here are seven vinegar uses for pet owners.
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French Bulldog Breed
The French Bulldog has always been a companion dog: small and muscular with a smooth coat, short face and trademark "bat" ears. Affectionately known as the Frenchie, it is loved for its endearing nature and even disposition.
The French Bulldog loves playing and enjoys entertaining its family. It is fond of snoozing with and cuddling its favorite person. Although the Frenchie is a fun-loving dog, it has minimal exercise needs. It loves an outdoor romp but does not enjoy hot and humid weather. In fact, the French Bulldog is not suited for outdoor living and cannot swim.
The Frenchie, which has an average lifespan of 9 to 11 years, is prone to major health problems like brachycephalic syndrome, intervertebral disk disease (IVDD), allergies, and canine hip dysplasia (CHD), and minor problems like patellar luxation, and hemivertebra. The French Bulldog breed is also sensitive to heat and anesthesia, and dogs of this breed must be delivered by Caesarean section. Knee, eye hip, and spine tests are advised for this breed of dog.
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The Top 10 Signs Your Dog May Be Sick

As is the case with people, a dog’s health changes with age. Unfortunately, our pets age much faster than we do.

Symptoms
Regardless of your dog’s age, you play a key role in helping her combat illness and remain as healthy as possible. Remember, your dog cannot describe symptoms to you, but she can show you signs of disease. Awareness of the signs of the most common diseases is one way to help reduce your pet’s risk of being affected by them. It’s a little scary to consider that at least 10% of pets that appear healthy to their owners and their veterinarians during annual checkups have underlying diseases.1

The top 10 signs that your dog may be ill:
1.Bad breath or drooling
2.Excessive drinking or urination
3.Appetite change associated with weight loss or gain
4.Change in activity level (e.g., lack of interest in doing things they once did)
5.Stiffness or difficulty in rising or climbing stairs
6.Sleeping more than normal, or other behavior or attitude changes
7.Coughing, sneezing, excessive panting, or labored breathing
8.Dry or itchy skin, sores, lumps, or shaking of the head
9.Frequent digestive upsets or change in bowel movements
10.Dry, red, or cloudy eyes

If your best friend shows symptoms of being ill, you should contact your veterinarian immediately.

Unfortunately, you may not always recognize that your dog is sick. Often, even the most well-intentioned dog owners attribute the subtle signs of disease to aging.
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Rabies is a scary viral disease that is transmitted through a bite or scratch—saliva or blood from an infected animal must pass into your dog’s bloodstream. Rabies can also be passed to dogs if infected saliva comes in contact with their eyes, mouth, or nose. Worldwide, dogs are the most likely animal to infect humans with rabies, due to their close contact with each other.

Once symptoms of the disease develop, rabies is fatal. There is no cure, only prevention. Here are five steps you can take to reduce the risk of your dog contracting rabies.
Rabies is a scary viral disease that is transmitted through a bite or scratch—saliva or blood from an infected animal must pass into your dog’s bloodstream. Rabies can also be passed to dogs if infected saliva comes in contact with their eyes, mouth, or nose. Worldwide, dogs are the most likely animal to infect humans with rabies, due to their close contact with each other.

Once symptoms of the disease develop, rabies is fatal. There is no cure, only prevention. Here are five steps you can take to reduce the risk of your dog contracting rabies.
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Rabies is a scary viral disease that is transmitted through a bite or scratch—saliva or blood from an infected animal must pass into your dog’s bloodstream. Rabies can also be passed to dogs if infected saliva comes in contact with their eyes, mouth, or nose. Worldwide, dogs are the most likely animal to infect humans with rabies, due to their close contact with each other.

Once symptoms of the disease develop, rabies is fatal. There is no cure, only prevention. Here are five steps you can take to reduce the risk of your dog contracting rabies.
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Cats are notoriously difficult to medicate. Unlike their less discerning canine counterparts, cats are sophisticated and discreet about what they eat. You typically can’t hide a pill in a meatball or a piece of cheese and expect a cat to wolf it down on command. That just ain’t happenin’. Here’s a few pointers on how to get your cat to take pills.

Hide the pill in tuna

Although most cats won’t eat a pill hidden in food, there are a few fish fanatics who will indeed scarf down a pill that is camouflaged in the center of a chunk of tuna. This often works for a while, until the cat expertly learns to eat the tuna and leave a spotless pill behind.

Use pill pockets for cats

Pre-packaged soft cat treats with a hole cut in the center are available, designed specifically for administering pills or capsules. Drop the medication into the hole, then pinch the treat closed. Some cats love the treats and will scarf them down — until that day when they bite right into the center and taste the medication. Trust me, they will forever look at these treats with disgust, and they will never eat another one again. You’re back to square one.

Hide the pill in crushed food

Crushing the pill into a fine powder and mixing it into their wet food sometimes works; however, if the cat decides to only eat 60 percent of her food that day, then she’s only gotten 60 percent of her medication dose. I often tell my clients to mix the powdered medication into a teaspoon of something very palatable (baby food usually works like a charm) and, once they see that the entire dose has been administered, the rest of her breakfast (or dinner) can be given.

This may or may not work. Cats are finicky about their food, and what is caviar to a cat on Monday may become Brussels sprouts on Tuesday. Many pills are bitter, and trying to mask a bitter powder with tuna or sardines often misses the mark. Rather than make the medicine taste better, it only makes the food taste worse.

Clients often ask if they can crush the pill into a powder, and then mix it with a little milk or water and syringe it into the cat’s mouth. In theory, this sounds promising but, again, many medications are bitter, and milk or tuna juice is not enough to mask it.

More tips on how to get your cats to take pills:

There’s no way around it: At some point in your cat’s life, she is likely going to need to be administered some pills. Here’s the method I prefer (The description below assumes that you’re right-handed. If you’re left-handed, substitute the word “left” for “right”):
1.Put your cat on a stable, flat surface, like a table or desk. Ideally, you’ll have someone else to help hold your cat steady. If not, wrapping a towel around your cat’s body often helps to steady her.
2.Hold the pill between your right thumb and index finger.
3.With your left hand, grasp your cat’s head as if you were holding a ball — your left index, middle and ring fingers are on your cat’s left cheek, and your left thumb is on your cat’s right cheek.
4.While gripping your cat’s head, aim her nose upward. Not just up, but waaay up, so that the nose is pointing right at the ceiling. This will cause her mouth to naturally drop open a little bit.
5.Use your right middle finger to push her lower jaw open a little wider, then drop the pill (which is between your thumb and index finger) down the back of her throat. This is the most critical step. If the pill lands on your cat’s tongue rather than the back of the throat, she may kick it out with her tongue, and you’ll have to repeat the entire process.
6.Keep grasping her head, but let go of her lower jaw as soon as you drop the pill. Gently stroke her neck, and/or blow on her nose. When she licks her lips a little, it usually indicates that she has swallowed the pill. It’s a good idea to syringe a small amount of water into your cat’s mouth right afterward to ensure that the pill has gone down. Some pills, if they adhere to the esophagus, can cause irritation and swallowing problems later on. Water helps alleviate that.

Videos on pilling your cat:

There is no shortage of videos online that show you what I’ve just described. These two illustrate how to get your cats to take pills:

How To Give Your Cat A Pill – VetVid Episode 020

How to Give a Cat a Pill or Tablet

Of course, they manage to find the most cooperative and well-behaved cats for these videos, so don’t feel like a failure if things don’t go as smoothly. As with everything in life, the more you practice, the more proficient you’ll become.

Read more about cat health on Catster.com:
•What Causes Sudden Death in Cats That Are Otherwise Healthy and Young?
•Your Cat’s Butt Is His Health Barometer
•What We’re Talking About: Facts on Feline Dental Health

Thumbnail: Photography by Shutterstock.

Dr. Arnold Plotnick is the founder of Manhattan Cat Specialists, a feline-exclusive veterinary practice on Manhattan’s upper west side. He is also an author of The Original Cat Fancy Cat Bible. Dr. Plotnick is a frequent contributor to feline publications and websites, including his own blog, Cat Man Do. He lives in New York City with his cats, Mittens and Glitter.
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What might your puppy’s checkup include?
The first thing your veterinarian will likely do is perform a complete, physical examination. Most veterinarians will start using their hands to palpate or feel your puppy from nose to tail. You will notice that your veterinarian will feel the puppy’s tummy and listen to the puppy’s heart and lungs using a stethoscope. Other visual inspections may include:
•Checking the puppy’s ears for infection
•Checking the puppy’s genitals to be sure they are normal
•Checking the puppy’s teeth and discussing brushing and oral hygiene

Much of what your veterinarian does may go unnoticed. Your puppy’s movement and disposition will probably be evaluated too.

What should I ask my veterinarian?
One of the most important things your veterinarian will do is answer your questions. Puppies can be a real challenge and it is important to be comfortable asking questions of your veterinarian. Don’t be shy; this is a great opportunity to strengthen the bond between you, your puppy and your veterinarian.

Like with children, your puppy will need to see your veterinarian every few weeks and your veterinary practice will set a schedule for your next appointment.

Your veterinarian is your puppy’s health advocate. Together, you can make sure that every system is checked and all of your questions are answered.

If you have any questions or concerns, you should always visit or call your veterinarian -- they are your best resource to ensure the health and well-being of your pets.

Your New Puppy Checkup
Your New Puppy Checkup
pethealthnetwork.com
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