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David Schuck
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Wage Claim Lawyer
Wage Claim Lawyer

59 followers
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Oregon employers cannot allow you to work for free. Sometimes called "free time", "off-the-clock" time, or simply asked as a "favor", many employers manipulate employees to performing work that they must be paid for without recording it on the time clock. This does not comply with Oregon law. Under Oregon law, all time the employer suffers or permits an employee to work, and all time the employee is "authorized" to attend, must be paid.

In fact, Oregon has new laws to protect employees from this exact issue. It is so common that a special law had to be put in place regarding employers coaxing employees to work for free. If your employer is asking you work for free, track it, and call us at (360) 566-9243.
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Don't let your Oregon employer steal from you. Electronic clocks can be weapons to steal your wages. Employers can program the punch clock to steal time by changing the punch times, deleting time for lunches, or simply changing the total hours to reduce your wages. You are not defenseless. Track your time. In addition to the unpaid wages you find, you are likely due civil penalties, and if your employment has ended, penalty wages. Each of these penalties can exceed several thousand dollars. If your boss is stealing your wages call Schuck Law for a free consultation at (360) 566-9243.
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The minimum wage in Oregon is currently either $11.25 or $9.50 depending upon whether you work in the Portland Metro area or elsewhere in the state. These rates were just recently increased to this amount. If your employer did not increase your pay on July 1, 2017, or if it still is not paying you your minimum wages, you have a claim. In addition to the unpaid wages, you could be entitled to a minimum wage civil penalty. This penalty can equal up to 30 days of wages. So for Portland workers, the minimum wage civil penalty could equal $2,700. Employers also violate the minimum wage laws by forcing employees not to record all their time, deducting the cost of uniforms or normal business expenses from employee's minimum wages. Some employers even change electronic time clocks to avoid paying minimum wage. If you have issues getting your full minimum wages for all hours worked, call one of our attorneys at (360) 566-9243.

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Oregon wage claim attorneys - Oregon wage and hour law dictates when the employee must be paid all their final wages or paycheck. When an employee quits after giving not less than 48 hours notice, excluding weekends and holidays, all wages are due immediately. It should be noted, that simply receiving a paycheck timely is not sufficient. That final payment of wages must cover all wages that were due and owing at the time the employment ended. This includes, but is not limited to, minimum wages, overtime wages, off the clock wages, deducted wages, vacation wages, PTO wages, etc. If your boss does not pay all your final wages immediately after you quit with notice, then Oregon wage and hour law likely entitles you to penalty wages. Penalty wages are the continuation of your wages, at 8 hours per day until paid, or 30 calendar days have expired. Thus, an employee earning $10.00 per hour, would have a maximum penalty of $2,400.00. Our Oregon wage claim attorneys regularly prosecute Oregon wage claims to collect penalty wages due the employee because the employer did not timely pay all final wages. Call the Oregon wage claim attorneys at (360) 566-9243 for a free no obligation consultation. The Oregon wage claim attorneys at Schuck Law generally take Oregon wage claim cases on a contingency fee basis, essentially being paid by your employer to win your Oregon wage claim.
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Oregon unlawful wage deductions.
Oregon wage and hour law severely limits what an employer may deduct from its employee's wages. Many unlawful wage deductions are the results of employers attempting to offset their normal business losses through payroll. Unlawful deductions I commonly see are for items such as: employee broke something owned by employer (dishes or product), employee allowed customer to leave without paying, employee held responsible for till shortages, or employee was allegedly overpaid wages. These common deductions are often called self-help. Even fewer types of deductions are allowed to be taken from minimum wage. Authorization by the employee in such instances is irrelevant. For instance, tools, equipment, and uniforms cannot be deducted from minimum wage.

Where an employer violates these wage deduction laws, the employee is entitled to their damages or $200, whichever is greater. The employee may also be due civil penalties, and/or penalty wages depending upon multiple other factors. Each of these penalties could equal up to 30 days of wages. The maximum amount of each penalty is calculated by multiplying the employee’s hourly rate, by 8 hours per day, for 30 consecutive days. At $13.00 per hour, the 30 day penalty would equal $3,120. For a free consultation call (360) 566-9243 or view our website at http://www.wageclaim.org/or-wrongful-deduction/. Oregon Wage Claim Attorneys.
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