Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Epic Collectors
19 followers -
The Market Community for Collectors and Gamers
The Market Community for Collectors and Gamers

19 followers
About
Posts


Chicago Non-Sport Card Show Promotion

For those of you attending the Chicago Non-Sport Card Show, October 4-5, 2013 (www.nonsportcardshow.com), look for our promotional materials.

The featured artist for this event is Gabriel Bautista, Friday Only. Promo cards will be offered from Rittenhouse Archives, Breygent Manufacturing, 5FINITY Productions, Frank Eachus Publishing, Gabriel Bautista, Scifi Cards and Epic Collectors.

We created our very own promo card so be sure to look for the Epic Collectors promo card which includes a discount to our service.

Let us know what you think of the show!

EpicCollectors.com
info@epiccollectors.com
Add a comment...

For those of you attending the Philly Non-Sports Card Show, May 4-5 
(http://phillynon-sportscardshow.com), look for our promotional materials. 

The artist line-up includes Matt Glebe, Mick Glebe, Rhiannon Owens, Sean Pence, Dave Sharpe, Lark Sudol and Jeff Zapata. Promo cards offered include Star Wars Jedi Legacy P-5 from Topps, Star Trek TNG: Heroes & Villains P4 from Rittenhouse, Revenge Season 1 NSP-01 from Cryptozoic, Once Bitten: Art of the Vampiress PNS001 from Asylum Studios, Game of Thrones Season 2 P5 from Rittenhouse and many more. 

The Garrison Carida chapter of the 501st Legion (http://www.501stgarrisoncarida.org) will be at the show on Sunday, so don't miss your chance to get your picture taken with your favorite Star Wars villain.

Be sure to pick up the Epic Collectors promotional material which includes a discount to our service. 

Let us know what you think of the show!

EpicCollectors 
info@epiccollectors.com 
Add a comment...

For those of you attending the Chicago Non-Sport Card Show, April 19-20 (http://www.nonsportcardshows.com), look for our promotional materials. 

The featured artists of this event are Dan Gorman and Charles Simpson. Promo cards will be offered from Rittenhouse Archives, 5FINITY Productions, Scifi Cards, Largo Intergalactic VIE, and Marty & Boo's Cards. Game of Throne fans will be excited to learn that Rittenhouse has provided an exclusive P4 promo card for Season 2 of Game of Thrones.

Be sure to pick up the Epic Collectors promotional material which includes a discount to our service. 

Let us know what you think of the show!

EpicCollectors 
info@epiccollectors.com 
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
eBay's New Fee Structure Still Ridiculously Expensive

Recently eBay announced their new fee structure and it is still incredibly high. As long as they are the   biggest game in town they will charge whatever they like. We at Epic Collectors figured now would be a good time to do a cost comparison. Let us know what you think?

Here are three scenarios comparing eBay new fee structure to Epic Collectors:

Scenario 1
Jill currently lists 200 Star Trek trading cards and collectibles on eBay and on average sells 10 items per month with an average selling price of $50 including shipping.

Yearly fees on eBay: $852 per year
[$191.40 basic store for year (includes 150 free listings per month) + $120 in listing charges ($0.20 x 50 per month) + $540 (9% sales fee of $45 each month)]

Yearly fees on EpicCollectors.com: $75 per year
(limited time regularly priced at $120 per year)

Scenario 2
Jack currently lists 1,000 Magic the Gathering gaming cards on eBay and on average sells 50 items per month with an average selling price of $50 including shipping.

Yearly fees on eBay: $3,900 per year
[($599.40 premium store for year (includes 500 free listings per month) + $600 in listing charges ($0.10 x 500 per month) + $2700 (9% sales fee of $225 each month)]

Yearly fees on EpicCollectors: $75 per year
(limited time regularly priced at $120 per year)

Scenario 3
Janet currently lists 5,000 Star Wars trading cards, autographs and collectibles on eBay and on average sells 200 items per month with an average selling price of $50 including shipping.

Yearly fees on eBay: $14,460 per year
[$2159.40 anchor store for year (includes 2500 free listings per month) + $1500 ($0.05 x 2,500 per month) + $10,800 (9% sales fee of $900 each month)]

Yearly fees on EpicCollectors: $75 per year
(limited time regularly priced at $120 per year)

These pages were used to calculate eBay fees:
http://pages.ebay.com/sellerinformation/news/springupdate2013/springfeesimplification.html 
http://pages.ebay.com/sellerinformation/news/FeeIllustrator.html 

Cold Hard Facts

You are paying a fortune selling your collectibles on eBay.


You can come to Epic Collectors and pay a very, very reasonable rate to list all of your items. Perhaps for the first time you can actually know what you own because you can list everything without having to worry about listing fees. You can even list items you are not selling and use our site as an inventory management program. We even let you download a spreadsheet of all your items.

We are even giving away sealed boxes of cards (Star Trek, James Bond and coming soon Star Wars) to the first 25 users who open a web store. Conditions apply. Details (http://www.epiccollectors.com/news/free-cards-promo_6

Compare how much you pay a month to list your items to what it would cost to list all your items on Epic Collectors for a year. Pay our small subscription rate and you get a customizable web store that functions like a personal web site with a unique web address you can share with others in addition to the more affordable fees.

Please give us some feedback.

Create a store on Epic Collectors today!
Add a comment...


Responsible #Password #Security  

Epic Collectors implements robus password security measures, because a password is much less useful in protecting one's information if anyone other than its creator knows it. The goal of our password security is to process each password in such a way that the data we save on our systems makes it extremely difficult for anyone to determine them, even for us here at Epic Collectors. This protects members' Epic Collectors accounts as well as their other online accounts. We use strong, proven standardized tools to do this, including cryptographic hash algorithms, a layered security approach, and cryptographically secure pseudo-random numbers.

How We Process Passwords
Cryptographic hash algorithms (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryptographic_hash_function) transform their input, in this case passwords, to a standard-length jumbled string of characters. Even a small change in a password will drastically change the resulting string of characters, commonly referred to as a hash. A hash cannot be produced from any other password, nor does it trivially reveal the password. Even if an attacker can see the hash he or she can only guess at the input that created it. This is commonly referred to as a brute-force attack, because there are no shortcuts to aid in making better guesses against a secure hashing algorithm.

By saving only the hash, it becomes exceedingly difficult to learn the original password, but one verifies a password simply by jumbling it and seeing if its hash is the same as the saved hash. We use the SHA512 (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sha512) secure hash algorithm to jumble passwords and create hashes.

Salt (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryptographic_salt) is extra input we add used to uniquely change how the algorithm jumbles each password. If two members use the same password, they will have different hashes because their salts are different. Also, each password cannot be identified by its hash if that password's hash is discovered or leaked by another system using a different salt or no salt at all. The salt is based on a cryptographically secure pseudo-random number (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CSPRNG), or CSPRN, generated each time a password is created or reset, which means it is nearly impossible to guess.

Key stretching (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Key_stretching) processes a password through the algorithm thousands of iterations before outputting a hash, increasing the processing time needed for each password. The increase in time is short when checking a single password, but for billions of passwords entered in a brute-force attack, it will take months or years, even on a supercomputer. And changing the number of iterations performed, even by one, radically alters the hash.

Pepper, or an application-wide secret key, is another value used to change the final hash. We enter the pepper, also based on a CSPRN, along with the hash generated by the first algorithm to a related hash algorithm used for authentication with a secret key (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMAC). The result from this HMAC-SHA512 authentication with our pepper is the hash we save in our system.

The Result
Here is an example of what a hash we store looks like:
jjnBkmlhyy30eFDZSPaPfFPor62qGqUgt05AdcWnsBLfvu0L3bfzKbhCW4tasIklELUySbI8A+hMm0hnb3mnwg

There are 86 characters, with 64 possible characters in each position, which results in 86^64 possible combinations, approximately 6 followed by 123 zeroes. That is a lot of combinations to search through by guessing and why it can take a brute-force attack months or years. And remember, the results of the process are completely changed if any one of the key stretching iterations, salt, or pepper values is changed.

Layered Security
Each member's salt must be stored alongside the final hash of their password to be used when verifying their password input, but the number of iterations the hash algorithm performs and the pepper value are each stored in other secure locations. The separate storage of these three variables which each radically change the final hash saved for each password creates layers of security. If one variable becomes known, the others must still be guessed before a brute-force attack with even a remote chance of success in a realistic time frame can be made.

A Brief Review
Each time a password is created or reset, we create a new, unique salt based on a CSPRN and save it for that member. We process the member's password with this salt via the SHA512 hashing algorithm, configured to iterate thousands and thousands of times. We then pass the resulting hash to the HMAC-SHA512 algorithm along with the pepper. We store the hash from that algorithm in the system alongside the salt for that member. We process the input the same way when that member is asked to enter his or her password again. If the final hash is the same, the member is granted access because we know the input was the correct password.

Additional security posts covering how to choose good passwords, email security, and more coming soon!
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Over 2500 Non-Sports Trading Cards Now Available

Some of the things you can buy today are: Star Wars, Star Trek, Xena, Battlestar Galactica, and Babylon 5 cards; James Bond, and Outer Limits, Star Trek autographs; premium Star Wars and Iron Man cards; and much more.

If you have non-sport collectibles like trading cards, action figures or comics, start a free 30-day trial or pay the subscription fee ($25.00 per 4-month period for first 50 stores) to open your own store to sell, share, and organize your collection. List and sell all of your science fiction and fantasy cards, games, books, and memorabilia for one small subscription cost (plus PayPal fees). Join today and receive a free box of cards (Details: www.epiccollectors.com/news/free-cards-promo_6).
Photo
Add a comment...


We are offering a free 30-day store trial. Open your own personal web store for sci-fi and fantasy cards, games, and other memorabilia today.

What You Can Do With Your Trial

1. Add inventory. Experiment with the most fundamental controls for inventory management and see how your items will display.

2. Upload images. You can edit and change sharing options for up to 5MB of your images with the image manager.

3. Customize your workspaces. Inventory is organized by universe and type in tables in your inventory manager. With custom workspaces, you can add your own columns to these tables to connect related tags and improve the sorting and searching of your inventory for you and your customers.

4. Import inventory from a spreadsheet. If you have inventory in an eBay store, you can use the TurboLister program to save your inventory as an spreadsheet file and upload it directly to your Epic Collectors store. If you just keep your own spreadsheet, there are directions (http://www.epiccollectors.com/help/inventory/importing) on how to modify it so that you can use it instead.

5. Upload a unique banner image with your store's name on it. This banner will be seen on all of your store pages.

6. Enter location information so your customers know where you will be shipping from.

7. Add store policies and description information to describe why and how you do business.

Benefits Of Upgrading To A Full Subscription

1. Your web store and inventory become visible to others and you can make sales.

2. Some of your new and featured items may be advertised on the front page.

3. All inventory in your store can be exported as an Excel spreadsheet.

4. Space for image storage for your account increases from 5MB to 250MB.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
New Star Trek cards for the give away are here! Open a store to get a box. Read more - http://www.epiccollectors.com/news/free-cards-promo_6
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Some of the boxes for the free cards promotion have come in! Open a store now and we'll send you one on us. Details apply - http://www.epiccollectors.com/news/free-cards-promo_6
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
We are introducing a highly flexible way to label and organize content, a system to replace traditional tagging.

A New Way To Tag
Most systems that support tagging simply allow you to add keywords to content. While this practice helps with basic searches, it does little to help organization because the tags have no explicit relationship to other tags. To categorize data, we need to know how one piece of content relates to another. Epic Collectors uses tag grouping to overcome for its inventory management.

How To Group Tags
Say there are five tags: Red, Blue, Green, Yellow, and Orange. We know that these are all colors, but a typical tagging system can understand neither one tag's relation to another nor what kind of tag it is. Epic Collectors created groups as a simple way to identify them. By adding a tag group (really just a tag for other tags) called "Color" and associating each of the five color tags with the group, we can:

1. Organize, sort, and search our data by color as if using the group as a custom category and the color tags as options in that category.

2. Use custom fields for specific types of items instead of predefined ones that are global, vague, and not necessarily applicable to everything (i.e. Size is useful for figurines but often meaningless with trading cards)

You can read specifically how tag grouping works with workspaces in our inventory management system at http://www.epiccollectors.com/help/inventory/workspaces.
Photo
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded