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Erwin Blumenfeld, Vogue (1941)
Very rare that an image would be used on a cover with so much background..but Blumenfeld tended to break the 'rules'.
Hats were very important in the 1940's, a key accessory in a woman's wardrobe. 
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Yasuo Kuniyoshi, New York, 1941
http://www.modernism101.com/brodovitch_new_school.php
"Yasuo Kuniyoshi was born in 1893 in Okayama, Japan. At the age of thirteen he came to the United States and a year later began studying at the Los Angeles School of Art and Design. In 1910 he moved to New York and took courses at the National Academy of Design, the Independent School of Art, and the Art Students League, where he studied with Kenneth Hayes Miller. He was married to fellow artist, Katherine Schmidt from 1919 to 1932, and after traveling throughout Europe, they moved to the Woodstock, New York in 1927 and took part in the Woodstock Art Colony. Kuniyoshi studied and later taught at the Art Students League summer school there. By 1930, he had established himself as an internationally known painter and graphic artist. In New York City he taught at the Art Students League, the New School for Social Research, and served as the first president of the Artists' Equity Association from 1947 to 1950. Kuniyoshi was active in social organizations, especially Japanese American organizations, such as the Japanese American Committee for Democracy, and took an active role in the war effort during World War II. Yasuo Kuniyoshi died in 1953 and was survived by his second wife Sara Mazo who preserved the legacy of his work." quoted from: http://www.aaa.si.edu/collections/yasuo-kuniyoshi-papers-9175/more
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Ilse Bing (German, 1899–1998) 
View from the Hotel Algonquin, New York, at Night ... in the shadow of World War II, she and her husband immigrated to New York City in 1941. There, she had to re-establish her reputation, and got steady work in portraiture. http://www.metmuseum.org/collections/search-the-collections?ft=ilse+bing http://www.moma.org/visit/calendar/exhibitions/1041 http://www.moma.org/explore/publications/modern_women/blog/float-the-boat-finding-a-place-for-feminism-in-the-museum
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http://www.cabinetmagazine.org/issues/2/rudolfarnheim.php
"Arnheim conducted some of the earliest experiments in the application of Gestalt theory in the perception of a work of art. Between 1928 and his departure from Nazi Germany in 1933, he was on the editorial staff of Die Weltbühne, the influential weekly magazine then edited by Carl von Ossietzky and suppressed with the advent of the Third Reich. It was in this publication that Arnheim ventured into film criticism, a medium that became central to his theories of vision. Between 1933 and 1938, Arnheim worked in Rome as an editor at the League of Nations' International Institute for Educational Film. With the declaration of the "racial laws" in Fascist Italy in 1938, Rudolf Arnheim went to
England, with the assistance of Herbert Read, where he worked as a translator at the Overseas Office of the BBC in London. Along his paths he termed "rises and descents, twists and vistas", he migrated to the United States in 1940. Assisted by a Rockefeller Foundation Grant, by 1941 he was associated with the Office of Radio Research at Columbia University and from 1942 to 1943 held a Guggenheim Fellowship in New York. The latter year also marked his entrance into academe. While on the faculty of Sarah Lawrence he also taught at the New School for Social Research and from 1959 to 1960 held a Fulbright Lectureship at Ochanomizu University in Tokyo." quoted from: http://post.thing.net/node/1607
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Ad Reinhard
"American painter and writer. He was renowned for his work as an abstract painter and for his influence on Minimalism; he also wrote and lectured throughout his life, using these forms to deal with matters he felt were best left out of painting. He set his date of birth in the context of a personal, cultural and political chronology, describing it as having taken place nine months after the Armory Show had ended, on the eve of Europe’s entry into World War I and during the year in which Kazimir Malevich painted the first geometric abstract painting. Extensive travel throughout the world fed his encyclopedic interests.
Reinhardt studied (1931–5) literature and then art history under Meyer Schapiro (b 1904) at Columbia University, New York, where he gained a broad-based arts education; also under Schapiro’s influence he became involved in what were then considered radical campus politics. Reinhardt was editor of the humorous campus publication Jester, for which he created covers in a flattened Cubist style.
Reinhardt’s decision to be an artist was strengthened by his years at Columbia, but his practical training as a painter came primarily after graduation, first at the National Academy of Design and, from 1936 to 1937, at the American Artists’ School on 14th Street. There he was affected by the alternatives proposed by the painters who ran the school, Francis Criss (b 1901) and Carl Holty (1900–73), to the then dominant Social Realism: Criss favoured asymmetrical geometry in his urban landscapes; Holty flattened and divided figures and objects into complex and broad shapes of solid colour. Reinhardt became a member in 1937 of the American Abstract Artists (AAA), of which Holty was chairman; Reinhardt also became affiliated to the Artists’ Union and the American Artists’ Congress, through both of which he met Stuart Davis, who became a great inspiration to him. Reinhardt thus allied himself with the forward-thinking American artistic–political groups of the late 1930s.
From 1936 to 1941 Reinhardt was among the relatively few abstract artists employed in the Easel Division of the Works Progress Administration’s Federal Art Project (WPA/FAP). His numerous paintings that resulted consisted of collage-based, solid-toned, linear, interlocking, geometric forms, such as Abstract Painting (1940; priv. col., see Lippard, 1981, pl. 20) in which his circular and rectilinear shapes were composed as variations on small, cut-paper collages. Reinhardt seemed to have reached immediate artistic maturity. During the early 1940s his original Cubist-derived geometry grew in complexity, as organic and gestural markings gradually replaced precise, hard-edged forms. Though the foundation of his art was collage, as the decade progressed his paintings and drawings were characterized by an embellished linear activity comparable to the incipient Abstract Expressionism of some of his colleagues, as in Number 18 (1949; New York, Whitney). Reinhardt’s work was included in The Ideographic Picture, the group exhibition organized in 1947 by Barnett Newman at the Betty Parsons Gallery in New York; among others taking part were Newman himself, Hans Hofmann and Theodoros Stamos. Apart from a year’s interruption for military service from 1944 to 1945, throughout the 1940s Reinhardt’s art focused progressively on a gestural and linear abstraction related to Abstract Expressionism.
When Reinhardt’s funding from the WPA/FAP came to an end in 1941 he began a period of commercial and industrial jobs and freelance graphic work. He was associated with the vanguard PM newspaper as an artist–reporter from 1942 to 1947, producing memorably incisive cartoons. His earliest solo shows occurred in 1943 and 1944 and recognition quickly followed. In 1944 his work was first acquired by a public collection, A. E. Gallatin’s Museum of Living Art (this collection was donated to the Philadelphia Museum of Art in 1946). Reinhardt joined the Betty Parsons Gallery in 1946, where he remained throughout his life. In 1947 he took up a post at Brooklyn College, teaching art history.
There are definite links between Reinhardt’s work and that of the Abstract Expressionists, particularly with Barnett Newman and Mark Rothko. Reinhardt’s abhorrence, however, of the biomorphism, emotionalism and cult of individuality favoured by the Abstract Expressionists led him to produce geometric paintings dominated by grid structures and by variations of a single colour, for example Red Painting (1952; New York, Met.) and Black painting (1952–3; see Colour interaction, colour pl. VIIId), signalling a break with them. Curved forms were eliminated in favour of horizontal and vertical brick-like strokes of paint. Ragged, sinuous edges were purged. His new perception of the work of Piet Mondrian and his personal contact with Josef Albers, with whom he taught in the Yale University Art Department from 1952 to 1953, were catalysts for this return to the geometric. The solid symmetrical blocks of colours characteristic of his late paintings appeared by 1952. These rectilinearly and then squarely structured monochrome paintings were first painted in shades of blue or red and culminated in Reinhardt’s final black series, for example Abstract Painting, Black (1960–66; London, Tate). With these ‘ultimate’ paintings, Reinhardt merged his art and his aesthetics, concentrating the viewer’s attention on gradations of colour of such subtlety that they were nearly impossible to see. Reinhardt’s early identification with the New York School was challenged by his more potent role as the precursor of Minimalism and conceptual art of the 1960s and 1970s. His reductive paintings, buttressed by some of his most complex prose, insisted on the primacy of direct observation unattended by literary or naturalistic association. These dark and seemingly invisible works were composed in nine-part, Greek cross blocks. Reinhardt pursued this form exclusively until his death."
Patterson Sims
From Grove Art Online
© 2009 Oxford University Press
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Start 2014 off on pointe: http://bit.ly/1hUSwX7 #FromtheArchives

Photographed by Horst P. Horst, October 15, 1941
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Untitled 1941-42. Untitled, Mark Rothko, 1941-42 
"Late 1940/Early January 1941: Mark Rothko and his wife move to mid-town. (RO153) Mark Rothko and Edith were living in their new mid-town apartment by early January 1941. Milton Avery referred to their new apartment as "a nice big apartment" that was "really swell" in a letter dated January 13, 1941. Their new apartment was on 28th Street near Fifth Avenue. Presumably, Edith's successful jewelry business was their main source of income at the time. (RO153)
After Rothko and Edith temporarily separated in 1940, Rothko returned to live with his wife and to work for her jewelry business. Edith had the front part of the loft as her jewelry workshop and Rothko painted in the back. According to their friend, Sally Avery (wife to Milton Avery), Edith "didn't want him [Rothko] to paint because he didn't sell anything."
quoted from: http://www.warholstars.org/abstractexpressionism/timeline/abstractexpressionism41.html 
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The Secret Life of Edward James (1978): Presented by George Melly
The Secret Life of Edward James, George Melly's documentary film from 1975. The film is a biography of surrealist art collector Edward James. James was patron of René Magritte, Leonora Carrington and Salvador Dalí (the Mae West Lips sofa was originally designed for his house Monkton), and lived the only life a responsible aristocrat can lead: inventing impossibilities and flouting convention.

James' life is a catalogue of incredible moments: the argument of his royal paternity, defacing his Lutyens-designed home with surrealist flair, his scandalous divorce and bisexual forays. All of this was a prelude to his final monument: Las Pozas. A surrealist sculpture garden filled with gigantic concrete structures that burst out of the Mexican jungle, it is full of needless and wonderful invention.

Not screened since its first appearance over 35 years, this film is a serious addition to the canon of British eccentricity. Jazz musician and art historian George Melly teases out James' unique character as only a fellow member of the rarefied clan could. The Coelacanth Journal's 7th issue on the theme of 'High Rise'. To find out more, go here: http://www.thecoelacanthpress.co.uk/The_Coelacanth_Journal.html
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Rosella Hightower
A Great Native American Ballerina To Remember - Part 1
A Great Native American Ballerina To Remember - Part 2 

"The footage is of this great native American ballerina on stage performing 'Piège de Lumière', a ballet created for her by John Taras. In it, she is a butterfly in a tropical forest who enchants a group of escaped convicts.
Hightower began her training with Dorothy Perkins in Kansas City. After seeing Léonide Massine performing in that city, she was invited by the Ballets Russes dancer to Monte Carlo to join a new company he was forming there. Arriving in Europe and finding the offer was only for further auditions, Hightower (ultimately) joined the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo and it was in that company that she met André Eglevsky, who was later to become her partner.
She joined Ballet Theatre in 1941 but returned to the Ballets Russes fold in 1946 to become a member of Colonel de Basil Ballet's Original Ballet Russe.
In 1947 she joined the Grand Ballet de Monte Carlo also known as the Grand Ballet du Marquis de Cuevas or simply the de Cuevas Ballet - a decision taken due to the presence there of Bronislava Nijinska, who was to choreograph the virtuoso 'Rondo Capriccioso' for her."
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Gertrude Lawrence - The Saga Of Jenny
Gertrude Lawrence - The Saga Of Jenny (Kurt Weill - Ira Gershwin). 23 feb, 1941. From 'Lady In The Dark'. Ms. Lawrence in her portrail of Lisa Elliot in the 1941 Broadway run of "Lady in the Dark." Lisa was the editor of a fashion magazine, so ironically is featured in Vogue from the same year.
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