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Bill Anderson
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The last paragraph of Cass Sunstein in the New York Review of Books: It Can Happen Here:

In their different ways, Mayer, Haffner, and Jarausch show how habituation, confusion, distraction, self-interest, fear, rationalization, and a sense of personal powerlessness make terrible things possible. They call attention to the importance of individual actions of conscience both small and large, by people who never make it into the history books. Nearly two centuries ago, James Madison warned: “Is there no virtue among us? If there be not, we are in a wretched situation. No theoretical checks—no form of government can render us secure.” Haffner offered something like a corollary, which is that the ultimate safeguard against aspiring authoritarians, and wolves of all kinds, lies in individual conscience: in “decisions taken individually and almost unconsciously by the population at large.”

https://www.nybooks.com/articles/2018/06/28/hitlers-rise-it-can-happen-here/
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One key quote is something every researcher and scientist needs to keep in mind about their work: ‘Well, this could be wrong.’
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This February 2017 article is a required splash of cold water in my face. The last headlines from the Munich Post are the kinds of headlines we need from our current media. But I am not holding my breath!
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2018-05-21: ~17:00hrs: Cumulus Congestus, Austin, Texas, USA
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Informative and generative.
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"Karl Polanyi, in his landmark book, ‘The Great Transformation’, famously posited the ‘double movement’ of industrial civilisations, characterized by periodic swings between liberal and more labour oriented periods, such as the welfare state model vs the neoliberal period. Yet, though the latter is in deep crisis, it is not very clear that there are workable alternatives at the nation-state level, that won’t be derailed by transnational capital movements and strikes. Perhaps this means that social movements need to radically re-orient themselves to translocal and trans-national solutions and create adequate counter-power at the appropriate level to counter the increasing corporate sovereignty of ‘netarchical capital’? Just as capitalism is moving from the commodity-labor form to commons-extraction, perhaps now is the time for commoners to practice reverse cooptation? As a case study, we will look at the situation of the thousands of cognitive workers living and working in the global capital of digital nomadic workers, Chiang Mai in northern Thailand, but also about the new solidarity mechanisms being developed by a new wave of labour mutuals (such as SMart) in old Europe, who are organizing solidarity mechanisms for autonomous workers. Reviewing the emergence of new trans-local and trans-national organized networks, including how the token economy is used by sectors of cognitive labor to reclaim surplus value from capital investors, we will inquire into potential alternatives at different scales of governance (urban, bio-regional, nation-state, and beyond).

Our review of the emerging answers will lead to the concept of the Partner State, i.e. a community-state form that enables and scales commons-based cooperation at all levels.
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The Presence of Totalitarian States-of-Mind in Institutions: How human social-dynamics in organizations push these institutions to embody authoritarian structures and behaviors. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.6227252.v1
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Some down-to-earth thinking from Howard Becker regarding impact factors of journals and their content.
Howard Becker on journal impact factors

Dagmar Danko, Editor of The European Sociologist: "To what extent is publishing in a journal [with a high impact factor] 'evidence' for the paper's quality or relevance?"

Howard Becker: "Well, I hate to be so negative but... I have to say zero per cent. Why? Because 'impact factor' is a phony measurement. It pretends to measure scholarly or scientific quality. But to argue that would require – this is common practice in any serious science – showing that the impact factor, however it’s calculated, is correlated with an independent measure of quality or relevance or whatever anyone is claiming it measures. Without that demonstration, and no matter how many people accept or act on such a specious claim, it’s not proof of anything until they validate it that way. Absent that, it’s just a gimmick that the publishers of scientific journals use to persuade their customers to pay outrageous prices for their products. And in the same way 'impact factors' give academic administrators a specious 'measurement' they use to justify decisions on hiring, promotions, etc."

https://www.europeansociologist.org/issue-41/%E2%80%98errors-measurement%E2%80%99-or-%E2%80%98impact-factors-are-just-gimmick%E2%80%99-interview-howard-s-becker

#jif, #metrics, #impact
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Sandor Weores, the Hungarian poet, discerned the shadows the future cast before it when he wrote: 'Time for black prophecies are over: the Winter of History is whistling around us.' cf. Lawrence 'Presence of totalitarian states-of-mind in institutions': http://human-nature.com/free-associations/lawren.html
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We need to keep working on what we value and how that can be sustained. One key quote from this review: "The ability to value a healthy, sustainable planet, fairness, community and quality of life must be returned to the heart of economics."
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