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Clarissa Ryan
721 followers -
I'm interested in everything.
I'm interested in everything.

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I love the ship designs in "Bodacious Space Pirates." The anime itself is like a roomful of #scifi geeks were dared to write a girls' adventure show. (Never mind the name.)

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I ran across a piece of sf art that I liked and followed it to this artist's account:
http://tylercreatesworlds.deviantart.com/gallery/

His favorites by other DA artists look good, though I haven't had time to go past the first page yet:
http://tylercreatesworlds.deviantart.com/favourites/ (It's DA, so don't be shocked if there's an R or X-rated favorite somewhere in there.)

Don't know if you can see large-size images without an account, but I hope so. :)

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This happens to me, and I'm not even a professional. (It's one aspect of my professional life. It's not something I was specifically trained to do, nor is it the primary aspect.) Recently, I saw in passing some term from another language meaning "leaving things unread," with the implication that you don't want to spoil something. I do that; I think out of a fear that it won't be as good as I'd hoped. I had a couple of serious letdowns last year and the year before! But the copy-editing infestation in my brain, along with the tendency to analyze things from a sociological point of view, is also an issue. That's definitely part of why I put off reading a couple of friends' works way, way too long in the past few months. (At least now that I'm older, I know one doesn't HAVE TO mention errors that slipped through, unless an upcoming reprint is announced or feedback is solicited! It's good to grow...)

Anyway, it's a good piece. Hat-tip to languagehat, oddly enough.

"There is a danger to copy-editing. You start to read in a different way. You start to see the sentence as machinery. You focus on the gears and levers that connect words to one another; you hunt for the wayward semicolon, the unintentionally ambiguous phrase, the clunky repeated word. You even hope they appear, so you can kill them. You see them when they’re not even there, because you relish slashing your pen across the paper. It gets a little twisted.

As with any kind of technical knowledge or specialization, it is possible to take copy-editing too far, to be ruled by it, to not quite be able to shut it off when it ought to be shut off."

Any suggestions on how to do a more thorough, realistic cost of living comparison than the generic one that most sites give you?

For example, most have a standard number for groceries that isn't accurate at ALL for me. They always claim groceries cost more in the SF Bay Area than where I used to live, but it's not true for the way I shop. (Produce at the farmer's market, cereal at Trader Joe's, etc.: a lot of the staples I buy are cheaper in California, where they're produced, than in the South, and a lot of the organic/Asian/etc. items I buy are cheaper in California, where they're standard/there's competition/etc., than in the South, where they may be specialty/luxury/local monopoly items.)

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I won't read a book that's all world-building (I have to have great characters, and I hate a badly-done infodump), and I've enjoyed books that skimped on it. But for all that, I love it and I sometimes don't think it gets its due these days. (For that matter, that's some of the appeal of "clutterporn" in things like the Harry Potter films. Well-done clutter gives the viewer a sense of the world beyond the scene's edges.)

I can do without it in comic books, movies, and TV series (obviously, or I wouldn't be able to deal with Doctor Who--1-3 new civilizations a week, sometimes!) because they're generally so bad at it. But even then, I enjoy those telling details.

It's tempting to start just by writing a ton of world-building. It's equally common to be warned off of that, but if it's what's compelling to you, why not start there? You can always move it, work it in, or even cut it later (or rather, save it in a different file!). 

Oddly, what I'm working on at the moment is all dialogue and action. Heh.

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7 minutes of Rube Goldberg fun from Pythagoras Switch (Adult Version -- I don't know, I guess they're more complex or something than the usual ones). I find these strangely relaxing/meditative.

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