Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Alex Garcia
22,771 followers -
“Truly great friends are hard to find, difficult to leave, and impossible to forget.”
“Truly great friends are hard to find, difficult to leave, and impossible to forget.”

22,771 followers
About
Posts

Post is pinned.
ABOUT ME
Don't be disappointed if I ignore your hangout request. I can't be available 24 hours and I can't have long conversations. I mostly use hangouts with family. Private posts are the best alternative if you don't want to post public questions
I don't work for Google but I am a Google Top Contributor for Google+, meaning I get to work for free but I don't have secret contacts to make things happen. For more information go to http://www.google.com/get/topcontributor/
Born in Argentina
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argentina
Lived in 3 different countries
Blood type: Red
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Club_Atl%C3%A9tico_Independiente
Married, 2 kids.
Accountant.
Personal Computer user since 1981
Internet user since 1995.
Social network user since 2007.
Facebook disliker since Feb 2009, but stucked in there until Google entered the ring.
Have driven on both sides of the road.
Bilingual: Spanish and English
Favourite movies: Singing in the rain, Back to the Future, Gattaca.
Favourite music: Too many to make a list.
These days I listen to 97.3fm Brisbane.
http://www.973fm.com.au
Love reading. Always a book in hand. Ebook lately.
Interested in: Singularity and understanding what's the next step in human evolution.

My favourite quotes
LEARN from yesterday, LIVE for today and HOPE for tomorrow"
"Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery. Today is a gift, that's why it is called 'the present'."
"Consider the postage stamp. Its usefulness consists in the ability to stick to one thing till it gets there."--Josh Billings
"I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be."--Douglas Adams
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted" - Albert Einstein (disputed)

Bragging rights
I am a proud user of Google+ since July 1st, 2011.

Post has attachment
November 18, 1967
Pound in your pocket.
The UK government of Harold Wilson devalued the Pound from $2.80 to $2.40 (a devaluation of 14%). It was a major political event because the government had tried hard to avoid a devaluation, but felt forced into the decision because of a trade deficit, a weak domestic economy and external pressures from creditors.
Harold Wilson went on radio and television to reassure consumers that devaluation “does not mean, of course, that the pound here in Britain, in your pocket or purse, or in your bank, has been devalued”. It didn’t take an economist, however, to tell you that this statement was nonsense.
He added: "What it does mean is that we shall now be able to sell more goods abroad on a competitive basis."
After the devaluation, there was no economic miracle, growth remained below UK competitors, inflation rose and it did not solve the underlying issues in the UK economy. However, without a devaluation, the economy would have had more serious problems and may needed to have higher interest rates and a prolonged period of deflationary pressures.
#50yearsago #year1967
Photo

Post has attachment
November 17, 1967
Philadelphia students walk out.
On November 17, 1967, 3,500 students walked out of their classes and marched to the Board of Education to present their demands. The students called for the teaching of African American history, the right to wear African dress and the renaming of several predominantly Black high schools after African Americans who have contributed to US history.
Assembling peacefully at the Board of Education headquarters at 21st and the Parkway, the students were confronted by two busloads of police, led by then Commissioner Frank Rizzo. The result was that 22 people were seriously injured and 57 were arrested.
The School District did respond positively to many of the students’ concerns. Following the student demonstration, an Ad Hoc Committee for the Infusion of African and Afro-American Heritage was created. The Committee made a series of recommendations which became the basis for School District policy.
In 2005, African American History became a requirement for high school students in the School District of Philadelphia to graduate.
#50yearsago #year1967
Photo

Post has attachment
November 16, 1967
Queen of Malta.
Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip arrived on November 14, 1967.
Valletta, capital of Malta, was in festive mood and Palace Square, roofs, balconies and windows were crowded as the Queen of Malta drove in State through Kingsway to the Palace.
In reply to an address of welcome by the Prime Minister Borg Olivier, the Queen said: “Things have changed since I was here last, and this time it is my particular pleasure to be here as Queen of Malta.”
Highlights in the programme in­cluded the State opening of Parliament by the Queen of Malta, the presentation of new colours to the 1st Battalion King’s Own Malta Regiment, a children’s rally at Independence Arena, Floriana, a tour of St John’s Co-Cathedral, a Royal appearance at Manoel Theatre for part of a special performance by Maltese artists and musicians, a visit to the new University of Malta campus at Msida, the presentation of banners to the King’s Own Band Club and La Valette Band Club and the laying of the foundation stone of the new hospital in Gozo.
At the end of that visit on November 17, 1967, Her Majesty sent a message to Governor-General Sir Maurice Dorman: “It has been a moving experience for us to revisit Malta and Gozo, and we have greatly valued the opportunity of seeing at first hand something of the difficulties and possibilities which the future hold for you. ...I send my heartfelt good wishes for the happiness and prosperity of all my people in Malta and Gozo.”
Malta became a republic within the Commonwealth in 1974, and the Queen was replaced as head of state by the President of Malta.
#50yearsago #year1967

Post has attachment
November 15, 1967
Michael J Adams: The only death in the X-15 program.
Considered among the most successful research aircraft ever built, the X-15 was designed to explore flight at supersonic and hypersonic speeds, and at altitudes up to more than 60 miles, effectively reaching the edge of space. Spanning a decade, and total of 199 flights, the program only suffered a single fatality.
X-15 Flight 3-65-97, also known as X-15 Flight 191, was a test flight of the North American X-15 experimental aircraft. It took place on November 15, 1967, and was piloted by Michael J. Adams. It ended in tragedy when the aircraft broke apart minutes after launch due to technical difficulties, killing the pilot and destroying the plane.
At 10:30 in the morning on November 15, the X-15-3 dropped away from underneath the wing of NB-52B mothership at 45,000 ft (14,000 m) over Delamar Dry Lake.
At 10:33 he reached a peak altitude of 266,000 ft (81,000 m). In the NASA 1 control room, mission controller Pete Knight monitored the mission with a team of engineers.
At 230,000 ft (70,000 m), while descending into the rapidly increasing density of the atmosphere, the X-15 entered a Mach 5 spin.
In the NASA 1 control room, there was no way to monitor the heading of the aircraft, so the situation was unknown to the engineers monitoring the flight. Normal conversation continued between Knight and Adams, with Knight advising Adams that he was "a little bit high," but in "real good shape." Adams radioed that the aircraft "[seemed] squirrelly," and moments later repeatedly told Knight that he had entered a spin.
The ground controllers sought to get the X-15 straightened out, but there was no recommended spin recovery technique for the X-15, and engineers knew nothing about the aircraft's supersonic spin tendencies. The chase pilots, realizing that the X-15 would never make Rogers Dry Lake, headed for the emergency lakes, Ballarat and Cuddeback, in case Adams attempted an emergency landing.
Adams held the X-15's controls against the spin, using both the flight controls and the reaction control jets in the nose and wings. He managed to recover from the spin at 118,000 feet and went into an inverted Mach 4.7 dive at an angle between 40 and 45 degrees.
In theory, Adams was in a good position to roll upright, pull out of the dive and set up a landing. However, due to high gain in the adaptive control system, the X-15 went into a limit-cycle with rapid pitching motion of increasing severity, still in a dive at 160,000 feet per minute. As the X-15 neared 65,000 ft (20,000 m), it was diving at Mach 3.93 and experiencing more than 15 g vertically, and 8g laterally.
The aircraft broke up northeast of the town of Johannesburg 10 minutes and 35 seconds after launch. An Air Force pilot, who was filling in for another chase pilot, spotted the main wreckage northwest of Cuddeback Lake. The aircraft was destroyed, and Adams was killed.
My previous article about the X-15
https://plus.google.com/u/0/+AlexGarcia66/posts/Rdd3BMEkFUG

#50yearsago #year1967
Photo

Post has shared content
How to preview your profile card
Apologies for the mistake. Yesterday I said that you can't see your own card.
Actually you can. Thanks +Aakheperure Merytsekhmet for the tip.
It shows everything when you look at it, but information marked private won't show to others.
How to preview your profile / about me
Thanks to +Aakheperure Merytsekhmet for this tip.
This is not how everyone will see your profile card, unless you selected public on everything. If you marked some information as private it won't show up to others.
To access this view, go to profile and select about or aboutme.google.com.
From there top left menu, select preview.
Photo

Post has attachment
How to preview your profile / about me
Thanks to +Aakheperure Merytsekhmet for this tip.
This is not how everyone will see your profile card, unless you selected public on everything. If you marked some information as private it won't show up to others.
To access this view, go to profile and select about or aboutme.google.com.
From there top left menu, select preview.
Photo

Post has shared content
New profile cards
New profile cards on desktop
Hi all. Google profile has a new card layout when you click ABOUT in any profile or page. Unfortunately you can't see how your own looks like unless you look at it from another account.
Next time you are deciding if you want to add/follow someone give it a try.
Also don't abuse hangout requests, emails, calls and any other form of contact.

Post has attachment
New profile cards on desktop
Hi all. Google profile has a new card layout when you click ABOUT in any profile or page. UPDATE: Unfortunately you can't see how your own looks like unless you look at it from another account. To preview yours see https://plus.google.com/u/0/+AlexGarcia66/posts/UJR955HLqbt
Thanks +Aakheperure Merytsekhmet for the tip.
Next time you are deciding if you want to add/follow someone give it a try.
Also don't abuse hangout requests, emails, calls and any other form of contact.

Post has attachment
November 14, 1967
From maser to laser.
On this day, electrical engineer Theodore Maiman received a patent for his invention of the first laser, a device for creating a high-energy beam of artificial light that would have widespread application in medicine, industry, space travel and much more.
Theodore Harold Maiman’s knowledge of electronics and electricity, which he acquired in his father’s laboratory, enabled him to work in a repair shop at the age of 12. At 17, he passed the examination for a first class commercial radio–telephone licence as the youngest person in USA to hold it. He completed PhD in Physics from Stanford University.
In January 1956, Maiman started work at Hughes Atomic Physics Department (Culver City , California), where he headed the ruby maser (microwave amplification) project for the US Army Signal Corps. He dramatically improved the performance and design of the maser (reducing its weight from the original 5,000 lbs to 25 lbs) and delivered it on time.
He further refined the maser design, so that the final version worked with liquid nitrogen cooling (previous versions required lower temperatures and worked with liquid helium), and weighed only 4 pounds. He completed the maser project in the summer of 1959 and in August he was finally able to divert his attention to the laser (Light Amplification by Stimulated Emision of Radiation)concept, despite of lack of support from Hughes. The “race” to build the laser was in full speed.
Thanks to his independent attitude, he won the “race”. In May 1960, he demonstrated the laser in action, from a ruby crystal in his laboratory at Hughes in Malibu, where the company had recently moved. It is important to note that Hughes’ total expenditures in the period of laser development amounted to about $50,000, while other research groups spent millions of dollars in their unsuccessful struggles to obtain the coherent light. He sent a short version of his paper to the British journal “Nature”. Consequently, the first scientific report about the first laser appeared on August 6, 1960.
In 1962, Maiman founded Korad Corporation to develop and manufacture a line of high-powered laser equipment. Korad became the market leader in its field. He also co-founded Laser Video, Inc., where he developed unique large-screen, laser driven color video displays. He is the author of the basic patent on the ruby laser (the world’s first laser), and has authored patents on masers, lasers, laser displays, optical scanning, and modulation.
#50yearsago #year1967
Photo
Wait while more posts are being loaded