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Royal Lane Baptist Church
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Diverse People United in Christ
Diverse People United in Christ

33 followers
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Saturday, January 21, will be our first rummage sale work day of the new year. Please join us from 9 a.m. to noon, noon to 3 p.m., or BOTH! We can use workers of any ability or skill level. Lunch will be provided. And don't forget, if you plan to go on mission trip this summer, every shift you work helps to reduce your fee!

Also, if you have furniture or other heavier items that need to be picked up on Saturday, please contact Garland Hamic.

5:30 pm Family Supper - Family Hall - Spaghetti Squash, Salad, Garlic Bread, Chocolate Cake; 6:15 pm Midweek Service - Bible Study with David Matthews - Family Hall

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From the Pastor (Jan 5 2012):


Do you know the source of these phrases? "Fell flat on his face." "Powers that be." "The skin of my teeth." "Let us now praise famous men." "Be horribly afraid." "Put words in his mouth." Of course you do. Shakespeare, right? Wrong, English majors! These familiar phrases, and many others, come from the Bible. They will not be found in all versions of the Bible, and first appeared in King James Version of 1611.

The December issue of National Geographic has an excellent article on the King James Version, how it came to be, and its amazing influence on the English language and world history. (Brought to my attention by our very own Bible scholar, Steve Box.) It was not the first English translation of the Bible, but became the alternative to the two most popular ones. When King James VI came to the throne, he favored the Geneva Bible, for its scholarship. The other English translation of the time was the Bishops' Bible, which had been hurriedly translated by a dozen bishops in 1568. This divided heritage was what King James hoped to resolve. In 1604, he gathered an enormous translation committee of 54 scholars, who ran the gamut from Puritans to the highest of High Churchmen. The translation, from the original languages of Hebrew and Greek, was completed in 1611. Its impact is almost impossible to measure.

Today there are countless versions of the Bible. Which one should you choose? For beauty of expression, the King James Version (KJV) has no rival. But it is not the language we speak, and can be confusing in 2012. The newer versions all represent more colloquial renderings of the language, but this is both their strength and their weakness. Accuracy in translation is often sacrificed in the name of communicating to today's readers. Also, for the most part these newer versions are not direct translations from the Hebrew and Greek, but are versions of earlier translations. The Revised Standard Version (RSV) or the New Revised Standard Version (NRSV) is my personal choice. It was completed around 1950 and is a translation of the original languages. The New Revised Standard Version is only slightly modified and a bit more readable. Finally, whatever version of the Bible you use, you would do well to keep a reputable commentary close by. We have commentaries in the church library.

David

Tonight: 5:30pm - Family Supper in Family Hall: Spicy Black-Eyed-Pea w/Bacon Soup, Salad, Cornbread, Cheesecake; 6:15pm - Bible Study with David Matthews - Family Hall

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