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Dmitry Vyukov
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Progress on meeting the Issaquah Challenge... http://www2.rdrop.com/users/paulmck/RCU/C++Updates.2014.09.11a.pdf
Getting there, some more work required.  (Presentation at CPPCON, and what I was hoping to have been able to present back at Collaboration Summit, but it wasn't working back then.  :-)
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Join us Jul 24!
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Каждый желающий прийти человек обязательно должен заполнить форму с одним полем: http://goo.gl/KuW1zE Обсуждение будет в рассылке.
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by Dmitry Vyukov, Synchronization Lookout, Google, Moscow Hello, I work in the Dynamic Testing Tools team at Google. Our team develops tools like AddressSanitizer, MemorySanitizer and ThreadSanitizer which find various kinds ...
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+Chris Thomasson Btw, it is possible to make Relacy much nicer using the same compiler instrumentation as ThreadSanitizer. Basically you would be able to unmodified program (no $, native understanding of atomic builtins and std::atomic)... but the user base is too small to spend time on it :(
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Benign data races: what could possibly go wrong? Shows how even the most innocent "benign" data races can break badly.
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Thanks! The scratch storage example is actually based on your example in +Bartosz Milewski blog ;)
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Why Google should buy Uber

What if we all gave up our cars for a 24/7 driverless Uber service?

Much has been written about autonomous cars and the implications they might have for our future. I find most of these musings to be fun and fairly obvious: safer roadways that handle more traffic because computers will drive with more precision than distracted humans; cars that navigate themselves to empty parking spaces; relaxing in splendor in a car that looks more like an office, so you can dedicate another hour of your day to sending emails.

We're missing the point.

Driverless cars will entirely respin the fabric of our communities in ways that play out for many decades

Let me start with a question: if Uber could reliably pick you up anywhere with only 5 minutes notice, in a vehicle entirely suited to your transportation needs of the moment, and deliver you to your destination (anywhere in the country) on average 25% faster than you can drive yourself, would you own a car? And how much would you pay for such a service? $500 per month? Think about it: No car payments. No repair. No insurance. No gas. 5 minute pickup - to anywhere. Would you pay $1000 per month?

Interesting. But its more fun to think about what if we ALL did it  - or at least a large fraction of us. What would our communities begin to look like?

Lets start with our homes:

No garages. Who needs a garage when you don't have a car? How about a free exercise room for every American family instead. Or at a minimum, garages could be used as they are here in the Bay Area: as storage rooms. We'd certainly design them differently.

Driveways for dropoff. No need to make room for your buddies to park at your house for your superbowl party. Just a convenient little curbside dropoff by the street will do the trick.

No on-street parking. That ugly car parked in front of your house by your annoying neighbor? Gone. City dwellers waking up early to move your car on street cleaning days? Gone.

The implications for our towns and cities are probably even greater. A report from MIT Media Lab states that about 40 percent of gasoline usage in urban centers is people looking for parking places. No more. How much time and gas would we save? Well, at least 40%. But maybe a lot more.

 Come to the think of it, who needs parking spaces? Or parking garages? Even moderately dense communities could be served by a fleet of vehicles that is perpetually in motion, assigned by an algorithm to scurry silently and efficiently to the next assignment. Only in rural or sparse suburban communities might there be the need for a small cache of vehicles stored in order to ensure a reliable and responsive quality of service.

Next time you're in a plane, look out on your departure city as you take off and notice the fraction of your city’s square footage that is dedicated to temporary storage of vehicles. Imagine if 90% of those vehicles - and the associated storage space - were gone. Some might actually become parks or urban farms. 

Speaking of planes, what about airports? No parking garages, no shuttles, no watching the rental car agent type stuff  into her OS2 computer for 30 minutes.

Carpools? That's easy. The software can do that. And your wallet is credited for your willingness to share space with your friends and coworkers.

These fleets of shared vehicles would naturally be mostly electric. A driverless Uber service would solve the basic challenges associated with today's electric vehicles (limited range and recharging time). Cars would be recharged as necessary by the algorithm, and assigned tasks based on remaining battery life. Longer journeys might be assigned to special vehicles designed for that purpose - either longer-range electric cars or maybe good old fashioned hybrids.

For the first time since the invention of the automobile, we might actually reverse the incessant paving over of America. Our communities would be safer, cleaner, and more beautiful. No more gas stations on every street corner. Shopping areas could be redesigned as pedestrian-only thoroughfares, where pickup/dropoff points are placed here and there to maximize access and minimize impact. From my own vantage point, there isn’t a reason in the world why University Ave in Palo Alto should have cars on it. We would have access to personal transportation when we need it - and only when we need it - in vehicles that are quieter, cleaner, and entirely suited to our task of the moment.

Now how much would you pay?

Last thought: Who could actually pull this off? Car manufacturers? Um yeah. IBM? Not so much. Apple? No sir. There is one company in the world with the technology, the resources, the influence, the passion, and the kahunas to pull this off. That would be my former employer, Google.

For 8 years, I worked at Google to bring about the revolution known as cloud computing, the impact of which the world is just beginning to understand. But I think the potential of driverless Uber cars is even greater - think of it as cloud commuting.
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That's an awesome car 
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#golang goroutine blocking profiler is finally in, if you are at tip try 'go test -blockprofile'
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A happy family visiting +The Go Programming Language Moscow Users Group meetup yesterday.
+Rob Pike +Renee French 
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Кто меня добавил
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Presenting on #WebConf  about #golang   this saturday. 1000+ web devs, no Go track, but 4 Go-related talks
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My brain dump about #profiling #golang programs
A comprehensive guide on performance debugging tools for the Go language.
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The issue that I've referenced in that note mentions the kernel patch.
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I wish you run 2013 in four goroutines and accomplish everything just in one quarter! My bag is full of new packages, features, compiler and runtime improvements! Happy and concurrent 2013! Go go go!
                                 - Santa Gopher
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This particular bag contains race detector :)
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Good news, everyone!

Go race detector is in pretty stable state now, and I am looking for beta users before Go1.1 release.

To date the race detector has found 100+ bugs in various Go code, including 33 bugs in std lib.

Currently it works on linux/windows/darwin amd64. You need tip >= r14902.

The usage is very simple -- you just need to add -race flag to go command:
$ go test -race mypkg // to test the package
$ go run -race mycmd // to run the command
$ go build -race mycmd // to build the command
$ go install -race mypkg // to install the package

You may start with running your tests. However sometimes tests have limited coverage, especially with respect to concurrency. So it may be beneficial to run the whole program built with -race under a realistic workload. If it find a data race, it prints an informative report to stderr explaining where the race has happened.

I would appreciate any feedback, in particular:
- if it does not work for you for any reason
- if you find anything non-obvious regarding the detector
- your success stories

And, yeah, it significantly increases both memory consumption (~5-10x) and execution time (~2-20x).

Thanks!

Please post comments here:
https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups=#!topic/golang-dev/CLsy3zmf9Ec
[ANN] Race Detector, Dmitry Vyukov, 11/16/12 8:35 AM, Good news, everyone! You might have seen my commits related to the race detector. Now it's in pretty stable state, and I am looking for beta users...
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Announce on golang-nuts will be later, potentially with Go1.1 (people on golang-nuts may not know how to use tip).
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