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Bobbie Johnson
Works at GigaOM Media
Attended Queen Mary, University of London
Lived in haverhill, suffolk
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Bobbie Johnson

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What do you think of Wonga? People seem wildly divided, but I can't make my mind up either way.
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I think it is a good service for people who want to save their time.
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Bobbie Johnson

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I love this so much that I wrote about it: A clever chap called Martin O'Reilly used some number crunching to build a model of who would win Eurovision. He was right... but the citizens of Malta got a little miffed when they didn't finish as well as predicted.

http://gigaom.com/europe/big-data-eurovision/
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What's happening with Facebook and Lightbox? The London-based team behind the photo-sharing app has been bought by Facebook, but it seems that users and investors may be left out in the cold.

http://gigaom.com/europe/so-who-got-hosed-when-facebook-bought-lightbox/
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With the Facebook IPO just a few days away, I think people buying shares -- and Silicon Valley in general -- should be sending a letter of thanks to Russian investor Yuri Milner.

http://gigaom.com/europe/why-facebook-and-silicon-valley-owe-it-all-to-moscow/
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Just-Eat has raised another $64m for further expansion. They're likely to buy up more rival companies and expand into new countries.

Anyone use it regularly? (I don't)

http://gigaom.com/europe/just-eat-64m-funding/
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+Bobbie Johnson Aha, so it's not telephone based after all. I suppose the restaurants pay for the screens as part of set up costs? Don't suppose you have a picture of them?
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Bobbie Johnson

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I wrote a piece for the Times (of London) about the bizarre time I interviewed Steve Jobs. I thought it would be worth trying to write something about him that gave a different perspective than the rest of the coverage I've read over the last few days. Overall, it perhaps says as much -- or more -- about me as him. But I thought you might want to take a look anyway.

If you want to pay for access, you can read it here: http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/technology/article3146881.ece Otherwise, here's the original draft. It runs to about 2,000 words, so prepare yourself!



IT'S THE SITUATION that millions of technology devotees would give everything to find themselves in: sitting in a room opposite Steve Jobs, with the chance to engage him in an ordinary conversation. Except, of course, that whatever happened the conversation would never be classed as ordinary -- because Jobs is not just the head of a company, he's the leader of a religion: Apple.

Sitting opposite the master is precisely where I found myself one morning in Paris a few years ago. It was the culmination of a long campaign I'd been waging to gain access to him: in fact, as somebody who writes about technology, getting an interview with Jobs had become an obsession.

In recent years, particularly since his health has declined, he has barely talked directly to the media, and back then he was no more forthcoming. I'd been pestering Apple for years, trying to convince them that he should spare me even just a few minutes, only to be constantly told it was never going to happen.

But one day in September 2005, just as I had given up all hope of succeeding, the phone rang and I got the news: I'd been granted a one-to-one audience with the man himself.

Suddenly I started to panic about what it would be like, building it up in my head: after all, what exactly do you think you'll find when you meet a billionaire who has built a reputation for changing the world?

Over the years I'd built up a vague impression of what I could expect. There were stories detailing how he ruled the company with an iron fist. There were tales about the notorious "flamethrower" treatment he would give to anyone who made a mistake. His attention to detail and perfectionism were legendary.

Beyond this, I suppose I expected him to be something like the other captains of industry that I had come across as a reporter. Billionaires had a tendency to light up a room as soon as they walked in -- even if just because everybody else knew who they were.

Nearly all of them were blessed with magnetic personalities and enormous presence. The rest were possessors of a relentless, engaging intelligence that immediately dragged you in. Given what I knew about the levels of devotion given to Apple, I expected a leader so charismatic that his troops would die for him, somebody who could bend iron bars purely through the force of willpower. I expected fireworks.

Sitting in a hastily-constructed basement office in suburban Paris a week later, the reality turned out to be very, very different.

The interview took place during Apple's Paris Expo, a showcase of the company's latest and greatest technology. They had recently released some new gadgets -- including the now-forgotten Motorola ROKR, an ugly and unsuccessful precursor to the iPhone -- and Jobs had arrived to marshall a small press conference.

Once he had finished taking questions from the media, I was asked to accompany him and his retinue on a walk around the Expo, which had not yet opened. It was, I suppose, a chance to gaze upon a little piece of the empire that he had wrought.
Like everything else in Jobs's life, the schedule was meant to be tightly managed: a quick turn around the show floor, and then downstairs to his temporary office for our interview.
But just as I prepared for my big moment, fate threw two fingers up to my plans. Almost as soon as Jobs began his stroll, a wild gaggle of Apple fans suddenly appeared -- hooting, yelling his name and swarming all over us.

It emerged that somebody had left a door open at the other end of the building, and some Apple-zealots outside had spotted their man in the distance, and the length of the expo hall to try and get a quick shake of the hand or snatch a photograph with him.

Jobs, who had clearly not planned for this sudden brush with his faithful, visibly cringed as they approached. His bodyguards quickly realised he was unhappy, surrounded him and bundled him downstairs. A public relations officer grabbed me by the arm. "Give him a few minutes to sort himself out," she said. "Then you're on."

Suddenly I was in a room with the man I'd been chasing for years. But it wasn't what I expected at all.

Yes, the man sitting in front of me looked like the Steve Jobs I knew. He was dressed in the trademarked Steve Jobs uniform: a black turtleneck, loose blue jeans that never quite seem to fit, a pair of comfortable trainers. His hair was short, but not too closely-shaven. His thin, almost-invisible glasses gave him the air of a modern intellectual.

But the Steve Jobs I was used to seeing was always in command, always in control -- on stage, launching new products and telling the world to Think Different. This one, however, seemed shaken, and a little confused. As the interview was meant to begin, he sat at a computer near me and I watched as his face went blank. He went silent for five minutes or so. I studied him carefully as he lapsed into what seemed like a Buddhist trance.

We had half an hour scheduled to talk. I kept glancing up at the clock, the second hand slashing down my allowance with each movement. His assistant indicated that he still needed time to settle.

After a few more minutes -- each of them feeling like hours -- he suddenly roused. It was as if he'd just woken up, or as if somebody, somewhere had suddenly switched him on. It was startling. I half expected him to open his mouth and hear the sound of a computer booting up.

Though he was clearly still disturbed by his brief encounter with the real world -- even if they were the real people who bought his iPods and his iMacs -- he came to sit opposite me. He adopted a defensive, protective posture and motioned for me to begin.

We talked for the rest of that half hour in fits and starts. It was a stilted, jabby conversation, but the thing I remember most were his eyes: dark, penetrating things. I saw plenty of them, too, since he spent much of his time looking me directly in the eye -- his way perhaps of challenging me or batting back questions that he felt were impudent or inappropriate. As the minutes ticked by, that felt like most of them.

I asked him about Apple's environmental record, which had come in for some criticism recently. He rejected the claim that Apple's products were less green than its rivals with the same, precise line that he had used in the press conference.

"One automobile is, I'm sure, greater in impact than 100,000 iPods," he told me. "You can bring your iPod into an Apple store and get it recycled, and we run a battery replacement scheme. Even our packaging reflects these concerns: it's dramatically smaller these days, and we have removed styrofoam and such things."

When I pushed for more detail he simply refused to go any further. "I've said all there is to say," he responded. "Next question".

I mentioned his health. It was a year after he had undergone an operation to rid him of pancreatic cancer, and it seemed that he had beaten the disease into remission. Doesn't it feel good to be back in charge at Apple? He simply sat there and waited until the next question.

I asked him about his political ambitions. Apple, after all, had become a huge hit partly because it painted a picture of itself as the ambassador for a young, urban, progressive population. He was dismissive that this was representative of anything.

"We're not trying to sell belief," he answered, sharply. "We're just who we are. Apple has values we care about; Apple cares about tolerance. We are not a political company, but a company with a set of values."

But those values were close to his own, I pointed out, and he was well connected. Al Gore, a friend of his, had a seat on Apple's board. Jobs had volunteered himself as an advisor to John Kerry's unsuccessful campaign for the White House. He and his wife, Lauren, had given hundreds of thousands of dollars to Democratic causes over the last few years. So what did he think of the state of American politics? He just returned a cold, blank stare.

On more comfortable territory, he could let loose a little. He said people who messed around with Apple's software were tantamount to thieves. He said record label bosses were fat cats for wanting to make more money from iTunes.

"Music companies make more money when they sell a song on iTunes than when they sell a CD," he said. "If [record labels] want to raise prices, it's because they're greedy. If the price goes up, people turn back to piracy and everybody loses."

Those brief moments of light came every time he was on safe ground, when he had an enemy, and a narrative in which Apple was fighting the forces of darkness.

Still, things were hard. I knew Jobs was a notoriously secretive and private man who had little time for the press. But I had not expected every question to be met with such a dead bat. For most of my time with him, it seemed that he was barely even in the room. What was it?

Of course, he never speaks a great deal in public. Though Steve Jobs is known for his appearances on stage, he tends to let his products do most of the talking. And certainly he felt that his time could have been better spent than fielding questions from an irritating young journalist. But it wasn't just my awkward, artless interviewing that had discombobulated him.

My presence seemed to be another reminder that not everything could be controlled, in the same way that his unexpected brush with his fans -- an audience that he famously satisfies by ignoring almost everything they ask for -- had left him off-balance.

This is, after all, a man whose life is so carefully orchestrated that he rarely has to do anything he doesn't want to. He spends most of his life in or around Apple's headquarters in the Silicon Valley suburb of Cupertino, the same area where he has lived his entire life. He follows a strict routine. He is afforded great leeway by his thousands of staff, who interpret every word and action as if they were pronouncements from a prophet coming down from the mountain.

In fact, he is so used to getting his way that when his cancer first appeared, he and tried to beat it into submission simply through focusing on a diet of fruits and vegetables. It didn't work.

Perhaps, then, the disconnected Steve Jobs that I met was not simply dismissive or rude. Perhaps he was just a man who was desperately trying to assert control over an uncomfortable situation.

As Jobs's assistant called time on our rendezvous, he ground to a halt and wandered back over to his computer. I was ushered back out into the corridor left wondering what it was that had just happened.

Over the years I have met rich entrepreneurs and innovators of all stripes: Bill Gates, Richard Branson, Google's Eric Schmidt. I've interviewed people who have revolutionised the world through their work, like Sir Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the Web.

By reputation, I was supposed to have just met the most mesmerising character the business world had seen in decades. In person, Steve Jobs turned out to be the most inscrutable -- and the most peculiar -- of them all. §
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I met Jobs at a Homebrew Club meeting when he was just starting out. I was editor of a PC magazine and had a long talk with him. When he died, I wrote this account of the meeting:

http://cis471.blogspot.com/2011/08/steve-jobs-is-artist.html
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Have him in circles
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Bobbie Johnson

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Here +Loic Le Meur tells me that he's running LeWeb London because British prime minister David Cameron 'made him an offer he couldn't refuse'.

Reports of a horse's head in the Frenchman's bed are currently being investigated:

http://gigaom.com/europe/leweb-london-almost-happened-in-san-francisco/
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great post!
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Bobbie Johnson

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This is crazy. Not content with copying everyone's ideas, Rocket Internet's latest venture -- a Nigerian copy of Zappos -- was hastily taken down after it turned out the code was lifted directly from Fab.com!

http://gigaom.com/europe/rocket-nigeria-copies-fab/
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Bobbie Johnson

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Is Free Mobile's rapid acceleration proof that it's possible for a business -- even one in a market as competitive as mobile -- to go from zero to 60 pretty quickly, if it's interesting?

http://gigaom.com/europe/france-free-mobile-subscribers-unprecedented/
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I love disruption! Lets hope they can make it work and stick.
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Bobbie Johnson

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If you're a European broadband addict, where should you live?

Romania might not be the place that comes to mind, but perhaps you should take another look -- it's right up there with the Netherlands and Sweden in terms of broadband capability.

http://gigaom.com/europe/dutch-top-euro-broadband-table-but-things-are-slowing/
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Bobbie Johnson

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Vodafone is buying Cable & Wireless for £1bn -- but look at how much C&WW boss Gavin Darby (a former Vodafone executive who joined the company just a few months ago) is going to make from the deal. He's probably not even going to stick around once the deal goes through.

Is this just good business? Or is it profiteering?
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Interesting apology by +Robert Scoble - who basically called out Twitter's management for getting rid of a scad of people... until it was pointed out to him by Chris Sacca that they were still at the company, or had left years ago and that what he'd implied was quite possibly defamatory.

I'm sure he's genuinely sorry, and any apology slash correction has to be a good thing. But the real question is whether or not getting it wrong this time makes it less likely to happen again in the future? In addition, I'm interested in the implicit idea that transparency is an adequate remedy for errors -- something that his fans seem to have focused on -- rather than simply identifying the fault (not checking basic facts) and getting on with it.

"Unlike nearly every journalist, I write in a medium where you can refute my facts in real time and post the corrections right underneath for all to see. Also, unlike many other journalists I put my phone number right there for you to see... so anyone from anywhere can call me and ask "WTF?!"."

I'm challenging that: it's certainly not unusual for modern journalists to be responsive and transparent. Putting myself forward: my mobile number's on Twitter for anyone to call; almost everything I've written for the past six or seven years has had comments; I have made corrections both small and large on articles for my entire career, but cannot remember an incident where I failed to do the basic work of checking through information that I was given by a "source". And unlike Scoble, I never trained as a journalist: these things are just common sense.

To boil it down, we mustn't forget that transparency goes hand in hand with accuracy... it doesn't replace it.
Robert Scoble originally shared:
 
Apology to Twitter.


Chris Sacca, investor in Twitter, has blasted me on Twitter, saying I need to stop writing falsehoods about Twitter. Here's some of his Tweets:

https://twitter.com/#!/sacca/status/104957769383284736 @Scobleizer Maybe someday you'll do some actual research.@stevej&@robey still work at Twitter and @jeremy left in '09.

https://twitter.com/#!/sacca/status/104958409639608320 @Scobleizer You're in such a rush to be negative these days that you can't be bothered to write actual facts.

https://twitter.com/#!/sacca/status/104960152448409600 @Scobleizer If you have any integrity, you'll Tweet a correction, amend your G+ echo chamber post, and stop pretending you have "sources".

https://twitter.com/#!/sacca/status/104961358667325441 @cynthiaschames He started with a statement that just isn't true. He needs to correct it. People's reputations are hanging in the balance.

https://twitter.com/#!/sacca/status/104961664222363648 @cynthiaschames I think it's rude to write a post full of rumor and falsely include names of individuals in it. He should be embarrassed.

The Tweets go on at http://twitter.com/sacca

My phone is always on to clear the air. It's at +1-425-205-1921 I'd be happy to sit down with anyone from the company and any investor too to give their side of the story.

So, that all said, I'm sorry. I should have done fact checking as to the particulars of the story. Someone I trust sent me this list last night and I copy and pasted it in after verifying the first few were correct. That was lame and poor journalism.

I'm sorry for the harm that careless journalism did.

As to the negativity I'm showing around Twitter, well, I'd be happy to talk that out. But it's unfair to blast one of Twitter's longest-running users on that basis too. I've put literally thousands of hours into Twitter in my life and will continue to do so. I mention Twitter at the end of every one of my videos. I continue to use Twitter every day and continue to put many hours into putting good content into that service. The negativity I'm giving you is that tons of people in the valley keep talking to me about the problems at Twitter and I do have dozens of sources on that front.

Am I responsible? Absolutely. My reputation lives and dies on the accuracy of what I write. I was inaccurate today so my reputation has taken a huge hit. I'm sorry that I screwed up so badly.

Am I accountable? Yes I am. Why? Because unlike nearly every journalist, I write in a medium where you can refute my facts in real time and post the corrections right underneath for all to see. Also, unlike many other journalists I put my phone number right there for you to see +1-425-205-1921 so anyone from anywhere can call me and ask "WTF?" Already I see Twitter PR +Sean Garrett doing that. Sean, I'm sorry for the trouble I've caused you.

Also, my boss is +Rob La Gesse and his boss is +Lew Moorman and both regularly put their home numbers/cell phones on their blogs so you can call them and make it clear when I'm hurting either my reputation or that of my employer's, Rackspace (I must apologize to them too for making such a horrid mistake, this doesn't help them either and to the 3,000 employees at Rackspace and the hundreds of employees at Twitter, I'm sorry).

Robert Scoble
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I'd forgotten that, +Derek Powazek - but it's definitely a point worth making. He could have made the same argument very easily without trying to dress it up as a bit of reporting.

And +Timo Kataja I think you do a disservice to most journalists, but I know where the sentiment comes from. There's a lot of laziness out there (which is not new at all, merely more easily caught) but there's also a lot of very, very good and diligent work that doesn't get properly praised. Standards are important.
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People
Have him in circles
21,097 people
Work
Employment
  • GigaOM Media
    European correspondent, 2011 - present
  • Secret
    2011 - present
  • Guardian Media Group
    Technology correspondent, 2005 - 2010
  • Guardian Media Group
    Deputy editor, Technology, 2004 - 2005
  • Guardian Media Group
    Deputy production editor, MediaGuardian, 2002 - 2004
  • Daily Mail and General Trust
    Journalist, 2000 - 2002
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Previously
haverhill, suffolk - london - brighton - san francisco
Story
Tagline
Gadabout, troublemaker, cyborg, writer.
Introduction
I write things.
Education
  • Queen Mary, University of London
    English, 1997 - 2000
  • Castle Manor Upper
    A-levels, GCSEs, 1993 - 1997
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Male