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RAD Optometric Care, Inc.
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Study tackles ticklish issue of tallying young athletes with concussions.
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Getting a handle on how many adolescents sustain sports-related concussions is complicated. Athletes aren't necessarily eager to self-report for fear that they will be pulled from contests-and they may not spot the symptoms in themselves.

"Post-concussion vision symptoms include convergence insufficiency, accommodation disorder, saccadic abnormalities and unsmooth pursuit-tracking."

However, a study, published Sept. 26 in the online journal The JAMA Network tries to tackle the issue. In a research letter, titled "Prevalence of Concussion Among US Adolescents and Correlated Factors," researchers at the University of Michigan say they have found that 19.5 percent of students in grades 8, 10 and 12 self-reported sustaining at least one concussion.

The results were gleaned from the Monitoring the Future survey, which looks at the behaviors, attitudes and values of secondary school students in the U.S. More than 13,000 adolescents, ranging in age from 12 to 18, responded to the 2016 survey.

"Involvement in competitive sports was associated with greater odds of lifetime diagnosis of concussions," the researchers wrote. "These findings are consistent with those from emergency department and regional studies that show that participation in sports is one of the leading causes of concussions among adolescents, and that youth involved in contact sports are at an increased risk for sustaining concussions."

In the study, contact sports were identified as football, ice hockey, lacrosse and wrestling. Semi-contact sports in the study referred to baseball, basketball, field hockey and soccer.
Source: http://www.aoa.org/news/clinical-eye-care/youth-concussions
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Doctors of optometry offer tips for safe trick-or-treating!!!
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Doctors of optometry don't want to rain on the parade of galloping goblins, primping princesses and soaring superheroes on the sidewalks and streets of their communities this Halloween.

But they do want trick-or-treaters to see their way to a safe and ghoulishly good time. Better safe than end up in the emergency room after a close call with a car whose driver doesn't see you in the dark, or land at your optometrist's office with an irritation in your eye from the makeup complementing your costume.

"Studies have shown that a child's risk of injury or death, as a result of being hit by a car, in particular, is significantly higher around Halloween, so be sure that your children are able to see well and be seen when they begin trick-or-treating," says Sue Lowe, O.D., chair of the AOA's Health Promotions Committee.

Review the following tips on how to have a safe Halloween:
- Trick-or-treat during the day to ensure proper lighting and
better navigation of the sidewalks.
- If you are going trick-or-treating at night, bring a flashlight so
paths are clearly lit. Flashlights also make children more
visible to drivers.
- Ensure that costumes are bright by adorning them with
reflective tape for increased visibility by drivers.
- Young trick-or-treaters should be accompanied by an adult so
that they can be assisted.
- Wear costumes that fit properly or do not drag on the ground
creating a tripping hazard.
- Ensure that any hats, scarves or ties are secure so as not to
hinder vision. Masks can create blind spots.
- Be careful with pointed or sharp props, such as swords or
wands.
- Be careful when using decorative contact lenses. Contact
lenses are medical devices and can cause vision loss if not
used safely. See your optometrist who can evaluate fit and
contacts.
- Obey all traffic laws, whether driving or walking
- Use makeup with care. Use hypoallergenic makeup and avoid
the eyes. Have wipes handy should the makeup begin to run
or melt.

Source: http://www.aoa.org/news/clinical-eye-care/safe-halloween-2017
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How vaping affects the ocular surface
Smoking and health
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Tobacco smoking, as we all are aware, is detrimental to overall health and is associated with ocular surface disease. A 2016 meta-analysis suggests that smoking may associate with the risk of dry eye in general population. Furthermore, a separate study concluded that smoking might decrease tear secretion, goblet cell density, and tear MUC5AC concentration. These studies corroborate a 2008 study by Matsumoto.

Also, consider secondhand smoke. Secondhand smoke (also called environmental tobacco smoke, involuntary smoke, and passive smoke) is the smoke given off by a burning tobacco product and the smoke exhaled by a smoker.

The National Cancer’s Institute’s Fact Sheet on Secondhand Smoke notes that there is no safe level of exposure, with even low levels of secondhand smoke being harmful.

The Johnson & Johnson Ocular Surface and Visual Optics Department at Keio University of Medicine in Japan investigated the effects of acute passive cigarette smoke exposure on the ocular surface and the tear film in healthy non-smokers. Researchers found that even after brief exposure, adverse effects on ocular surface health was evidenced by an increase of tear inflammatory cytokines, tear instability, and damage to the ocular surface epithelia.

Similarly, Ward et al showed that passive exposure to cigarette smoke is associated with an increase in tear instability and damage to the ocular surface epithelia in soft contact lens wearers and non-contact lens wearers.

Of added concern, passive smoking represents a significant risk factor of dry eye in children.

Source: http://optometrytimes.modernmedicine.com/optometrytimes/news/how-vaping-affects-ocular-surface?page=0,1&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-_vpi1SD3r4-mNPCb6tUF8vVjnDafyfJ3bl-jL9xNuT_giEVmc4Gh8A_ju9AKwZ4L0hhgqdjU2dj50g7FFtYi4vR7gQ-A&_hsmi=57384031&utm_campaign=Issue%20Alert%3A%20Optometry%20Times&utm_content=57384031&utm_medium=email&utm_source=hs_email
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Learn About Low Vision
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What is low vision?
Low vision is a visual impairment that cannot be corrected with standard eyeglasses, contact lenses, medication, or surgery. With low vision, activities like reading, shopping, cooking, writing, and watching TV may be hard to do.
What are the signs of low vision?
Difficulty with any of the following—even when wearing glasses or contact lenses—could be an early warning sign of vision loss or eye disease:
Recognizing faces
Getting around the neighborhood
Sewing or fixing things around the house
Selecting and matching the color of clothes
The sooner vision loss or eye disease is detected, the greater a person’s chance of keeping his or her remaining vision.
Source: https://nei.nih.gov/nehep/programs/lowvision/learn-about
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Study: Disease-fighting T cells hold promise of treatment for preemies born with eye condition.
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A novel study on disease-attacking white blood cells, called regulatory T cells (Tregs), in the retina could provide hope for premature babies and diabetic adults with neovascular retinopathies.

The study by researchers at Monash University in Australia was published in a Sept. 29 article online in Nature Communications. The study sought to determine if a boost in T cells in the retina would reduce the disorganized, compensatory growth of new blood vessels (called neovascularization) in retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). The growth can cause the blood vessels to leak and scar the retina. In some instances, the retina may detach.

In their study, researchers found that an insufficient number of T cells were reaching the preemies' retinas due to the neovascularization. Recruited to the retina in their mice studies, however, the T cells reduced the vasculature, they say.

"Here we show that the expansion of Treg numbers results in their penetration into retinal tissue and a reduction in vision-threatening retinopathy, including vaso-obliteration, neovascularization, and vascular leakage," the researchers say. "These results indicate that harnessing the immunosuppressive capacity of Tregs is a potential therapy for the treatment of neovascular retinopathies."
Source: http://www.aoa.org/news/clinical-eye-care/t-cells-hold-promise-of-treatment-for-preemies-born-with-eye-condition
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Study: Early intervention can pay dividends in the classroom
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Recent study underscores how vision can contribute to children's academic success and the role of doctors of optometry.
Published in the International Journal of Educational Research, the study looked at the impact of impaired vision on the academic success of 109 schoolchildren, specifically 8- and 9-year-olds in the third grade. "Multi-sensory stimulation is essential in early development, as it encourages learning and brain plasticity," researchers at Queensland University of Technology wrote.
Up to 70 percent of daily classroom learning demands visual input-distance and near-vision acuity, contrast and sustained use of accommodative convergence, according to an earlier Australian study of fifth and sixth graders published in Clinical and Experimental Optometry.
Source: http://www.aoa.org/news/clinical-eye-care/childhealthday
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CALLING ALL MILLENNIALS!
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Did you know that we use our eyes much differently than any generation before us? This dramatic shift in digital usage and media consumption are exposing our eyes to blue light from electronic devices, which could adversely affect your vision in the future. Today the average American spends about 2 hours and 19 minutes online plus another 2 hours and 20 minutes conducting non-voice activities on tablets as well as mobile phones every day, according to a survey by eMarketer.

WHAT DOES THIS MEAN FOR OUR EYES?
It means that blue light, which radiates from digital sources like computers, smartphones, and televisions, can have an adverse effect on visual cells. In fact, researchers are learning blue light exposure plays a key role in the incidence and severity of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which destroys central vision and is the leading cause of vision loss in people over age 50, according to the American Optometric Association.

To showcase our new macular analysis instrument we are offering FREE MPOD (macular pigment optical density) testing on Friday 10/6 from 10am-7pm and Saturday 10/7 from 10am-6pm. Come find out if you are at risk and let us tell you how your doctors at Rad Optometric Care CAN help!!!
http://radeyes.com/contact/
CALL US AT: (818) 461-0595
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Does research support macular supplementation?
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Absolutely! Dr. John Herman who studied more than 500 subjects over a two-year period – the first and only study of its kind – documented changes in patients’ MPOD (Macular Pigment Optical Density) score following a healthy diet and regimen of 2 tablets of EyePromise Restore vitamins per day over a two-year period. Whether patients had a lower or higher baseline, MPOD scores continued to rise significantly every 6 months! The main conclusions of Dr. Herman’s study were as follows:
1) Subjects with lower MPOD scores achieved the highest % increase
2) MPOD scores increased in ALL sub-groups and the increase continued even at 24 months!
3) Subjects reported functional & structural improvements correlated with MPOD score increase
To showcase our new macular analysis instrument we are offering FREE MPOD (macular pigment optical density) testing on Friday 10/6 from 10am-7pm and Saturday 10/7 from 10am-6pm. Come find out if you are at risk and let us tell you how your doctors at Rad Optometric Care CAN help!!!
http://radeyes.com/contact/
CALL US AT: (818) 461-0595
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I have low macular pigment - now what?
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CALL US AT: (818) 461-0595
78% of the population has less than optimal macular pigment, but rest assured, significant increases can be achieved through nutritional intake and supplements containing Zeaxanthin and Lutein, such as EyePromise® Restore eye vitamins. EyePromise Restore vitamins are a macular health formula designed to increase macular pigment, providing vision protection and enhancement. All EyePromise eye vitamins are science-based, prescription-strength eye vitamins which support eye health. With more than 40-million doses consumed and counting, EyePromise products are made in the U.S.A. from only high quality all-natural ingredients and contain the highest levels of dietary Zeaxanthin available on the market. Additionally, these are the ONLY eye vitamin brand which is clinically guaranteed to increase MPOD score within 60-days or you will get 100% of your money back, no questions asked! To learn if eye vitamins may benefit your vision please consult your optometrist at Rad Optometric Care.

To showcase our new macular analysis instrument we are offering FREE MPOD (macular pigment optical density) testing on Friday 10/6 from 10am-7pm and Saturday 10/7 from 10am-6pm. Come find out if you are at risk and let us tell you how your doctors at Rad Optometric Care CAN help!!!
http://radeyes.com/contact/
CALL US AT: (818) 461-0595
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What are the benefits of increasing my MPOD score?
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CALL US AT: (818) 461-0595
Results may be patient dependent, however many patients
report:
- reduced sensitivity to bright light (photophobia)
- increased contrast sensitivity
- increased color saturation
- improved fine detail discrimination
- improved night vision and night driving
- better visual acuity
- better dark adaptation
Healthy macular pigment level has also been scientifically demonstrated to reduce risk of age-related eye disease, such as Macular Degeneration.

To showcase our new macular analysis instrument we are offering FREE MPOD (macular pigment optical density) testing on Friday 10/6 from 10am-7pm and Saturday 10/7 from 10am-6pm. Come find out if you are at risk and let us tell you how your doctors at Rad Optometric Care CAN help!!!
http://radeyes.com/contact/
CALL US AT: (818) 461-0595
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