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Crossing borders of information
Crossing borders of information

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OPEN CALL for low-power FM radio stations #LPFM  to apply for FCC licenses in the US. Read more:
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Sound Immigration Policy vs. Border Insecurity. Read more here:
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I am sitting in a wealthy neighborhood in Mexico City called Polanco after my last class. For once, the breakfast I ordered was well worth the price! I ordered two poached eggs, and they were served on a slice of dark pumpernickel style bread, with roasted parsley leaves and strawberry chutney. When I saw it on the menu, I thought was the strangest thing ever,  but ordered it because the dark bread made me feel nostalgic about Germany. Honestly, wasn't sure what to expect. And when it arrived, there it was, a fusion of flavors that is hard to describe, the sweet-and-spicy touch of the chutney combined with the light, crispy parsley flakes and the earthiness of the bread base. A delight! The combination of tastes was amazing! I am usually skeptical about the pricier places here in Mexico, because the food at the affordable markets is usually much better than the expensive places, actually  Plus, in a country where 65 percent live below the poverty line, I feel strange going into such places very often, and I am not exactly rolling in it either. But this time was an exception. If you feel like venturing out to the well-heeled world on the west side of Mexico City, stop here: Giornale's, 820 Paseo de las Palmas in Polanco!
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Back-To-School in Mexico 

Last week’s traffic jams and long lines at the papelerías, or stationery and paper goods stores, meant back-to-school for Mexico’s 27.5 million pupils. But not every kid went back to school today.  According to INEGI, the national census institute of Mexico, 6 out of every 100 children ages 4 to 6 do not.

Families of the 27.5 million pupils returning to school this month are struggling to keep up with associated school expenses, which include school supplies, uniforms, and school quotas.

The public schools in Mexico charge quotas of 250 pesos per student.  Over 14 percent of the 800 families who responded to a government phone survey found public school tuition to be very high. These fees are otherwise known as ‘elective donations’ and they bring 7 billion pesos of revenue to schools in Mexico each year, according to the National Federation of Parents. If parents do not pay the quotas, the school tells them they cannot guarantee a spot for their child.  The overcrowded public primary schools only run half-days and in two shifts. Expensive private schools pose an alternative for those families that can afford them.

To make matters worse, the cost of school supplies has gone up this year.  Overall, Mexican families spent over 2,321 pesos (200 USD) in August 2011 for associated back-to-school costs, and another 150 USD a month thereafter for school supplies, transportation, etc. In Mexico, many families are supported by incomes as low as 500 USD per month. 

See slideshow on tierra.com (Spanish):

http://bit.ly/PNUoWs
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