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Addressing Cloud Computing Security Issues and Challenges – Part 3

Addressing cloud computing security issues and challenges is a complex subject and this series of blog posts barely scratches the surface.  It all stems from the fact that when you store your files in the cloud, you are storing them on a computer that is owned by someone else.  In the first two posts of this 3 post series we looked at issues of ownership, data residency, legal jurisdiction, legal access by law enforcement and third party control, access and inspection of your stuff.  In this post we will take a look at the additional security considerations, breaches and outages.
 
Security Considerations

People use the cloud to store documents, pictures and videos. In business, employees store spreadsheets, word documents and presentations, many of which contain company confidential or client confidential information.  According to a study from Skyhigh of 18 million users, 21% of files uploaded to cloud providers contain confidential information such as personally identifiable information (PII), protected health information (PHI), payment card data, or intellectual properly and 34% of users have uploaded sensitive data to the cloud. One of the least recognized cloud computing security issues and challenges is that cloud storage holds a treasure trove of information from many users and organizations and is thus a honey pot and high value target for both hackers and national security agencies.

Breaches

Probably the most publicized cloud computing security issues and challenges is that of the data breach. Google Drive, iCloud and Dropbox have all suffered different forms of data breach.
For example iCloud was recently breached using a social engineering (or phishing) attack.  This is a vulnerability not from hacking Apple’s defenses, but from tricking users into giving up their user name and password credentials through a fake email and/or website.  Once an attacker tricks you into giving up your username and password, they simply take on your identity to access your account.  This is how hackers obtained explicit photos of Jennifer Lawrence from her iCloud account.  It is hard for even the largest of cloud providers to defend against users giving up their credentials.  To mitigate, you can either use a two-factor authentication process or encrypt the data you store in the cloud.  Two factor authentication ranges from answering an additional security question to inputting a randomized PIN from an RSA token, but most people don’t want the inconvenience of an additional security step and think they are safe behind the sophisticated defenses of a Tier 1 provider.  Encryption of data requires some degree of technical sophistication that average users lack.

In another example, in 2012, customer email addresses were stolen from a Dropbox employee’s account using credentials breached from hacking another site.  Most people use the same password at multiple sites.  Hackers know this and will go after soft, relatively unprotected targets to get passwords then use those passwords to get information from sophisticated sites that employ the best security.  Likewise, hackers stole the credentials of almost 5 million accounts and published them online forcing Google to ask users to change their passwords.  Most people believe they are safe storing their files with these large companies, but if a hacker tricks you into giving him your credentials or if they steal your credentials from a soft unprotected site, there is not much the cloud provider can do other than offer two-factor authentication.

Here are some headlines I found about big company cloud provider breaches.  You can read them for yourself.

“Hackers hold 7 million Dropbox passwords ransom” – CNET
” Dropbox and Box leak files in security through obscurity nightmare” – TechRepublic
“Google Drive Found Leaking Private Data” – Collaborista Blog
“Google warns Gmail users to change passwords after hackers post millions of account details online” – Mirror
“Dropbox Password Breach Leads To Mass Security Alert” – Huffington Post
“Dropbox confirms security breach” – Information Age
” Jennifer Lawrence, Victoria Justice, Other Celebs Victims Of More Leaks, Apple Denies Breach” – BuzzFeed
“iCloud leaks of celebrity photos” – Wikipedia
“Attackers use Google Drive, Dropbox to breach companies” – Help Net Security
“Attackers can access Dropbox, Google Drive, OneDrive files without a user’s password” – ZDNet
“Google Drive phishing is back — with obfuscation” – CSO Online
“Major cloud services such as Google Drive and Dropbox at risk from ‘man-in-the-cloud’ attack” – V3
“How Box.com allowed a complete stranger to delete all my files” – IT World
“Dropbox passwords leak: Hundreds of accounts hacked after third-party security breach” – The Independent
 
Outages – The Cloud Will Go Down

One of the cloud computing security issues and challenges that affects almost all users are the outages.  True that as the cloud matures, cloud providers become more sophisticated and overall uptime improves, but there will be outages even from the biggest cloud players.  Here are some notable outages over the past 3 years.
Google’s Infrastructure-as-a-Service was down in March 2015 for 45 minutes and February 2015 for 1 hour. In both May and March 2015, Apple’s iCloud was down for 7 hours affecting 200 million users.  That followed an outage in June 2014 of several hours and August 2013 of 11 hours. In January 2015 Verizon took its cloud offline for 40 hours for maintenance.

Dropbox was down for 1 hour in March 2014, 2 days in January 2014, 90 minutes in May 2013 and 16 hours in January 2013.  Google Drive was down 5.5 hours in March 2014, 25 minutes in January 2014, 5 minutes in August  2013, 40 minutes in July 2013 and 17 hours in March 2013.

Microsoft Azure cloud services was down twice in March 2015 for more than 2 hours.  Amazon Web Services was down in for 7 hours in September 2015, as well as 49 minutes in June 2013, 1 hour in August 2013, and 2 hours in September 2013.

Even though adoption of cloud services continues to increase, outages like these are among the factors that hinder their full embrace. These outages are only a small example of what is going on.  A host of other cloud services have also gone down such as Yahoo Mail, VMware, Jive, Microsoft BPOS, Microsoft Exchange, T-Mobile, Adobe Creative Cloud, Joyent, and Microsoft Lync.  Smaller services have outages as well, but because they don’t affect as many people, aren’t tracked the same way.

Addressing Cloud Computing Security Issues and Challenges – The Better Way

There is a better way to address cloud computing security issues and challenges.  The better way is access, share and stream from your own existing storage instead using FileFlex.

FileFlex enables secure remote access to all of your storage devices. It is differentiated from Enterprise File Sync and Share (EFSS) services through its proprietary file access virtualization technology. File access virtualization abstracts files from their physical locations to enable remote access of files from their source locations. The location of the file can be anywhere on a corporate infrastructure – corporate servers, server attached storage – Direct Attached Storage (DAS), Storage Area Network (SAN), and Network Attached Storage (NAS) –  FTP, PCs, laptops, private clouds and virtual private clouds.
All your files can be accessed from any computer, any laptop, any tablet or any smart phone, from anywhere. You don’t have to build a private cloud or upload and sync files to a third party. FileFlex can be set up so that your data stays on your storage, on your premises, behind your firewall and under your control.

How to Get Started

FileFlex is free to try. Click here to see for yourself.
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Addressing Cloud Security Issues – The Better Way – Part 2

Addressing cloud security issues can be daunting. In the first post of this series we saw that the cloud is simply a computer where you store your files and documents over the internet. Problems arise when you copy your files to a computer owned by a third party cloud provider. You lose control of your data, the provider can access your stuff at any time and can inspect your files. But these are just the tip of the iceberg. In this post we will take a look at the issues of ownership, data residency, legal jurisdiction and legal access by law enforcement.

Ownership

The first of the cloud security issues that we will look at in this post is that of ownership. When you store your stuff on your own computer, you alone are responsible for keeping it safe. But when you upload and copy it to the cloud provider you are essentially publishing it – even if it’s just for you. For the cloud service to work as designed, you give the service permission to store and make copies of stuff you stored. When it comes to ownership, it is simple – you own the data stored in the cloud. But you are giving rights to the cloud provider that erodes your ownership. Here’s what Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak says about consumer clouds and the erosion of data ownership.

“Nowadays in the digital world you can hardly own anything anymore. It’s all these subscriptions… and you’ve already agreed that every right in the world belongs to them and you’ve got no rights. And if you’ve put it on the cloud, you don’t own it. You’ve signed away all the rights to it. If it disappears, if they decide deliberately that they don’t like you and they cut that off, you’ve lost all the photographs of your life… When we grew up, ownership was what made America different than Russia.”

Google states your ownership like this.

“You retain ownership of any intellectual property rights that you hold in that content. In short, what belongs to you, stays yours.”

And then Google states their rights to the stuff you own like this.

“When you upload, submit, store, send or receive content to or through our Services, you give Google (and those we work with) a worldwide license to use, host, store, reproduce, modify, create derivative works (such as those resulting from translations, adaptations or other changes we make so that your content works better with our Services), communicate, publish, publicly perform, publicly display and distribute such content. The rights you grant in this license are for the limited purpose of operating, promoting, and improving our Services, and to develop new ones. This license continues even if you stop using our Services (for example, for a business listing you have added to Google Maps).”

According to Google, it retains these rights in order to give you the services you want – for example to enable you to share a document or to open it on a different device and according to the terms of service that permission continues, even if you stop using the service.

Data Residency

In light of the Snowden revelations and in order to safeguard the privacy of its citizens, the European Court of Justice struck down the 15 year old ‘safe harbor” agreement with the U.S. forcing Europeans to store their files on cloud servers located in Europe, under European jurisdiction and European law. In other words, they cannot store files in the U.S. under U.S. law nor under any other foreign jurisdiction.

When it comes to cloud security issues, some countries such as China and Russia have strict data residency requirements for maintaining control over the location where data and documents physically reside. Other countries such as Australia, Hong Kong, Canada, Germany, Italy, Luxemburg, Mexico, the Netherlands, Singapore, Switzerland and the U.K. regulate data residency for some types of information such as government files and healthcare records. Australia for example has the Privacy Amendment Act, Germany has The Federal Data Protection Act and the UK has The UK Data Protection Act. In addition, many professional associations such as law, accounting, finance, mortgage brokers and banking have professional standards for their members that include data residency requirements to govern the use of cloud service providers and to keep information within a defined geographic jurisdiction. The reason is simple. To maintain professional standards, they do not want personal and confidential files to come under the jurisdiction of a foreign power.

Legal Jurisdiction

But wait – even if you comply with data residency, you may still have cloud security issues when protecting your confidential files from foreign jurisdictions. When it comes to legal jurisdictions and cloud storage, you will find that who has jurisdiction over the files stored in the cloud is, well a bit cloudy. Are the files under the jurisdiction of the country where the physical storage is, under the jurisdiction of the country of the owner of the files or under the jurisdiction of the cloud service provider?

Even though the European court struck down the safe harbor agreement with the U.S., European law is meaningless to the U.S. judicial system. If the cloud provider is a U.S. company, it can be served with a U.S. search warrant for content it has in its possession regardless of where that content is located. As a U.S. company, in the eyes of the U.S. courts, it is under U.S. law. U.S. courts simply do not recognize the laws of other countries.

For example in late 2013, Microsoft was served with a search warrant by the U.S. Department of Justice for all content it had related to an email account of an Irish citizen held on its Microsoft servers located in Ireland. In order to comply with EU law, Microsoft responded by telling the DOJ that it should make its request to Irish authorities instead. The DOJ however argued that it doesn’t need to go to the Irish government because Microsoft is a U.S. based company and therefore must comply with U.S. law. Although this particular case is still before the courts it highlights the tensions between conflicting jurisdictions. Can the U.S. government reach into a European data center to obtain the personal communications of EU citizens without paying attention to EU law? If Microsoft obeys the DOJ request, it will be in violation or EU law. If it refuses the DOJ request, then it is in violation of U.S. law. The semblance that users actually own the files they stored on the cloud is gone. Because Microsoft owns the servers where the files are stored, for all intents and purposes, the DOJ is treating Microsoft as the owner of the files. Legally speaking, the concept of custodian and tenant that we looked at in part 1 of this series is also irrelevant.

The lesson is, when you store your stuff in the cloud, even if the files are stored on servers located in your own country, they may still be under the jurisdiction of a foreign power.

Law Enforcement

What about law enforcement trying to access your stuff? With a computer in your home or business, you’d have to be served a warrant and law enforcement would need to enter your premises to physically access or confiscate the computer. You would know and can involve your own lawyers. But with remote storage, you may not know that the cloud provider was served a subpoena or warrant or security order. In fact, the provider may be prohibited by law from telling you. The technology of cloud storage is what makes secret access by law enforcement viable. If you offer a service for example where client privilege is protected or assumed such as the attorney-client privilege of a lawyer, that privilege has the potential of being violated if you use a third party cloud provider.

Although nearly every provider’s terms read differently, one thing remains the same. They all tell you explicitly they must and will comply with legal requests from law enforcement and are not responsible for any loss you experience.

Addressing Cloud Security Issues – The Better Way

Because of tremendous productivity gains, we all use the cloud. Big companies with privacy and security concerns have built their own private clouds. But private clouds are expensive and require an IT department to set up and maintain. So what about those who do not have the resources to build their own cloud. Well there is a better way. The better way is this – Keep your files right where they are, on your own storage, under your own control, behind your own firewall and on your own premises. Securely access, share or stream that content from its source location using FileFlex. You don’t need to build a private cloud or copy anything to a third party provider.

Use FileFlex To Address Cloud Security Issues

The easiest way to address cloud security issues is FileFlex. FileFlex allows secure remote access, sharing and streaming of your own storage – all your storage – server storage, server attached storage such as NAS, SAN and DAS, desktops, laptops and FTP from any device, from anywhere.

What Are You Waiting For?

Use FileFlex to address cloud security issues by remote access, sharing and streaming of your own storage. It’s Free to Try. Click here to see for yourself.
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Remote File Access - The Better Way

For most of my working life I have had one primary computer that I used for all my work.  It was a laptop.  In case I had to work late or in case I was unable to go the office the next day I carried it home every night and  I carried it on every business trip so that I could work from the airport lounge or hotel room. Every file that I ever created was on that primary computer.  Sure I also had a home computer, but that was for my wife and kids to use.  I didn't have any meaningful files on it and rarely if ever used it.  I operated under what I would now call a device centric data paradigm.

With the introduction of the tablet and smart phone, my needs and paradigm have evolved.  I want to work using these small but powerful mobile devices as well.  The problem is that they don't have much storage and copying files back and forth between them and my laptop is inconvenient.  Well as it turns out, I am not alone in my evolving need from device centric data to data continuity.  

Industry Response

The industry has come up with lots of different ways to remotely access files stored on a primary computer.  They range from remote control and management of that primary computer over the internet, to Virtual Private Networks (VPNs), to syncing (or copying) some of the important files stored on that computer to cloud storage.  Remote desktop and VPN solutions have been used by IT departments and corporations for years.  They are expensive, technical and best left to the professionals.  The easy and practical solution for the rest of us has been to turn to the cloud.

Copying Your Stuff To The Cloud

When you access your files using the cloud you are essentially making a copy of your files and storing that copy on a computer operated by the cloud provider.   If you are using Google Drive, your are copying your files to servers owned by Google.  If OneDrive, you are copying files to Microsoft and iCloud to Apple.  You get the idea.  You then access the copy stored on their servers, not the source file stored on your computer.  They have technology on these servers which virtualize file access.  The technology abstracts the files from their physical location so that they can be accessed over the internet from your computers, tablets or smart phone from anywhere.

The Cloud is Problematic

Well as you can imagine, that although this process is easy, it is also problematic.  You are creating duplication and the process of creating and using sync folders can be confusing.  You have limited space, cannot copy all your files and can easily run out of storage.  It is easy to miss copying important files so that they are not available when you need them.  There are also privacy and security risks that are inherent with storing your files on someone else's computer. Besides issues of legal jurisdictions, third party inspection, access and ownership, they have all had service outages and even the most sophisticated have been breached.

The Better Way - Virtualize Your Storage

The better way to remote file access is to virtualize your own storage.  Instead of copying files to a server owned by Google, Microsoft or someone else, leave it where it is - access, share or stream it right from where it is stored to your tablet, smart phone or other computer by virtualizing access to your own storage. That is what FileFlex does for you. You don’t have to upload or sync your stuff to third parties. Your files stay on your storage – private, secure and under your control.

FileFlex File Access Virtualization

FileFlex virtualizes access to your own storage so that you can access, share and stream all your files from any device from anywhere. You can also let your family, friends or any email contact, by permission, access your stuff directly from its source location.

It’s Free to Try

Still not convinced.  Why not take FileFlex out for a test drive.  We have made it free to try.  Go to http://fileflex.com/remote_file_access

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Streaming - The Better Way

Do you remember how music went mobile? It all started with the Sony Walkman. The Walkman changed music forever because it allowed you to take your own music with you wherever you went and listen to it privately through your own ear buds. From the walkman we moved to the Discman and from the Discman to the MP3 player and the iPod. With the MP3 player, music storage itself changed from physical tapes and disks to digital files. This shift from physical tapes and disks to digital files didn't just change music, but videos and movies as well. Today they are all digital.

The Age of the Smart Phone and Rise of the Cloud

The introduction of the smart phone changed our paradigm from device centric data to data continuity and from storage to accessible storage. We expect all of our data to be at our fingertips and available to us wherever we are. That includes our digital files like personal music, movies and family videos. In response to our needs for accessible digital media we have turned to the cloud. The cloud solutions have virtualized their storage for digital media. What I mean by that is media stored in the cloud is abstracted from its physical location so that it can be accessed from any of your devices. Media stored on your storage devices however is not virtualized. They have the technology, so you copy your music, movies and videos from your un-virtualized storage to their virtualized storage.

The Better Way – Virtualize and Stream Your Own Storage

The better way is to virtualize and stream your own storage. When you use FileFlex file access virtualization you can access, share or stream your files from any computer, any laptop, any tablet or any smart phone, from anywhere. You don’t have to upload or sync your stuff to third parties. Your media data stays on your storage - private, secure and under your control.

FileFlex File Access Virtualization

FileFlex virtualizes access to your owned storage so that you can access, share and stream all your files including your music, movies and videos, from any device from anywhere. You can also let your family, friends or any email contact, by permission, access or stream your stuff.

It's Private and Secure

Remote access, sharing and streaming media with FileFlex is private. FileFlex has a layered approach to the security of your files. First, files stay in their source locations and nothing is moved or copied to a third party. Privacy and security of information can be contained completely on your own storage without worrying about breaches, outages, ownership or who has access to data when it is stored and maintained by third parties.

Secondly, streaming and sharing is by permission only and is not link based. You control who can access your stuff. And thirdly, users have high level encrypted direct access to the files with trusted certificates. This is the same level of protection offered by financial institutions to protect transactions over the internet.

What About My Music Streaming Service

Sure you can subscribe to a cloud music streaming service, however cloud music can't match listening to your own personal music collection on your smart phone. Sure you can upload them to the cloud and then stream them to your phone and it is great in theory, but in real life, it just doesn't stick. The upload process is slow and a hassle and do you really want your personal stuff stored on someone else's computer? We may start off this way with good intentions, but sooner or later the method breaks down.

You Want To Stream From Your Own Storage

Building and maintaining a media collection is most convenient on your own PC or NAS (Network Attached Storage) device. That's particularly true if you have a mix of MP3 backups from your CDs, digital downloads and MP4 files from your video camera. Once organized neatly, you want to access, stream or share them as easily as possible from all your devices - smart phone, tablet or other computer.

The easiest way to take your entire media library with you, no matter where you go or what device you are using is FileFlex of course.

It’s Free to Try

Still not convinced. Why not take FileFlex out for a test drive. We have made it free to try. Click the link below and see for yourself.

http://fileflex.com/streaming_with_FileFlex

http://fileflex.com/streaming-the-better-way/

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How To Get More From Your NAS - Virtualize It

Everyone needs more storage than typically available on the PC - home users for movies, videos, music and media and small businesses for shared files and backup. Enter the Network Attached Storage or NAS device. A NAS is a small, inexpensive Linux-based server specialized and built for storing and serving files over a network. The basic concept is this - here is a big storage repository that everyone over a network can use and requires no management, only a little configuration and it works pretty darn good. The NAS allows you to automatically store, backup and share files from, or to any PC on the network and is a great media server.

We Need Accessible Storage

The introduction of the smart phone and tablet has changed everything. According to comScore, in early 2015 over 75% of adults in the U.S. owned a smart phone and now penetration is estimated at between 80 and 85%. Seventy-five percent (75%) of our workforce is now mobile, essentially requiring only a laptop and phone and able to work from any location. Sixty percent (60%) of online adults use at least 2 devices a day and 40% start an activity on one device and finish it on another. 

As we travel with our shiny new mobile devices, we expect and demand that all of our information travels with us. We expect all of our files and folders to be at our fingertips. With the rise of the mobile worker our needs have shifted from storage to accessible storage and our paradigm shifted from device centric data to data continuity.

The Rise of the Cloud

In response to our needs for accessible storage and data continuity we have seen the rise of public clouds such as Google Drive, OneDrive and Dropbox, EFSS (Enterprise Private Sync and Share), private cloud and virtual private cloud solutions. These cloud storage solutions virtualize their storage. What I mean by that is files stored in the cloud are abstracted from their physical locations so that they can be accessed and shared from your devices. Files stored on your storage devices however are not virtualized. They have the technology, so you copy the files from your un-virtualized storage to their virtualized storage.

The Better Way – Virtualize Your NAS

The better way is to virtualize your own storage. You already own a NAS. Virtualize it. When you virtualize your NAS, you abstract the files stored on it from their physical location. Instead of accessing files stored on the NAS only through the network, when you virtualize it you can access share or stream your files from any computer, any laptop, any tablet or any smart phone, from anywhere. You don’t have to upload or sync to third parties. Your data stays on your storage, on your premises, behind your firewall and under your control.

FileFlex File Access Virtualization

FileFlex virtualizes your NAS so that you can access, share and stream your files from any device from anywhere. You can also let your family, friends or any email contact, by permission, access or stream your stuff. In fact, when you install FileFlex on your NAS, it becomes a gateway to all the devices and storage attached to your network. FileFlex doesn’t just stop there. You can also use it to virtualize your PC, FTP and server. Finally, you can link to your cloud providers so that all of your storage is at your fingertips through one dashboard.

My NAS Already Has Software – Why Do I Need FileFlex?

Some NAS manufacturers already have software that allows users to access, share and stream files stored on the NAS to remote devices. Unfortunately however, that is where your device manufacturer’s software ends. It virtualizes access to the NAS, but nothing else. When you virtualize your NAS with FileFlex, you are also virtualizing access to all the devices and storage that are attached to the same network. You are virtualizing access to your server, any server attached storage such as a SAN, DAS, private cloud or other NAS and every PC and laptop on the same network. A NAS with FileFlex becomes a powerful gateway into all of it. With FileFlex on your NAS, you can use that NAS to access, share, stream and perform remote multi-device file management functions to any and all your storage on your network. (Watch the demo to understand this better.)

It’s Free to Try

Still not convinced. FileFlex is free to try and easy to install. Click the link below to try it yourself.

http://fileflex.com/virtualize-your-NAS

http://fileflex.com/nas-virtualization/

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Secure File Sharing - The Better Way

We all have files that we want to share with our colleagues, family and friends – photos, videos, movies and documents. Back in the early days of file sharing, if you had something to share, you had to physically copy the file to a floppy drive, carry it over to your friend’s computer and then copy it over to his hard drive. This meant you had to physically transfer the files. (We still share files using a physical device today, however instead of floppy disks we use USB sticks.)
With the advent of email, sharing became a lot easier – all you had to do was attach the file to an email and hit send. The problem with email was that you could not send big files such as high resolution photos, or videos or large PowerPoint presentations. Even today, for small files email is still by far the most popular method of file sharing.

The Rise of Cloud Based File Sharing

The introductions of the smart phone and tablet have brought disruptive change to file sharing. Seventy-five percent (75%) of workers are now mobile, 60% of online adults use at least 2 devices a day and 40% start an activity on one device and finish it on another.1
As we travel with our shiny new devices, we expect and demand that all of our information travel with us. We expect all of our files and folders to be at our fingertips. With the rise of the mobile worker our needs have shifted from storage to accessible storage and our paradigm shifted from device centric data to data continuity.

The industry response to the data requirements mobile workers, smart phones and tablets has been massive. The industry has responded with public clouds such as Google Drive, OneDrive and Dropbox, EFSS (Enterprise Private Sync and Share), private cloud and virtual private cloud solutions.

Shortcomings and Limitations of Cloud File Sharing

In order to share from the cloud, you have to copy your file to the cloud or you have to create a sync folder and sync to the cloud. You are creating duplication. Sync folders can be confusing. You cannot sync everything and can easily run out of sync space. And it is easy to miss important files so that you do not have them when you need them. There are also inherent privacy and security risks. Even the most popular such as Dropbox have been breached and Google, Microsoft and Amazon have all had service outages.

Cloud storage solutions virtualize their storage. Files stored in the cloud are abstracted from their physical devices so that they can be access and shared from your devices. Files stored on your storage devices are not virtualized. They have the technology, so you copy the files from your un-virtualized storage to their virtualized storage.

Secure File Sharing Using File Access Virtualization – The Better Way

Secure file sharing using file access virtualization technology is the better way. The technology allows you to virtualize your own storage with file sharing directly from source locations. The technology abstracts your files on your storage devices and from their source locations so that they can be accessed and shared from any computer, any laptop, any tablet or any smart phone, from anywhere. You don’t have to upload or sync to third parties. Your data stays on your storage, on your premises, behind your firewall and under your control.

Also, when you use file access virtualization technology for file sharing, you do not run up against storage limits, file size limits or quality degradation.

File sharing using file access virtualization technology is very secure. FileFlex has a layered approach to the security of your files. First, files stay in their source locations and nothing is moved or copied to a third party. This means that it stays under your control or in the case of corporate clients under the umbrella of the corporate owned infrastructure, behind the corporate firewall and under the control of IT. Privacy and security of information can be contained completely on-premise without worrying about breaches, outages, ownership or who has access to data when it is stored and maintained by third parties. Second, users have high level encrypted direct access to the files with trusted certificates. This is the same level of protection offered by financial institutions to protect transactions over the internet. And third, FileFlex provides a log of data-in-motion activities (even for in-app activities via public clouds) for audit and regulatory compliance issues.

FileFlex File Access Virtualization – It’s Free to Try

Still not convinced. Well seeing is believing and we have made FileFlex free to try. To get your 12 month FREE upgrade go to:

http://fileflex.com/file-sharing

http://fileflex.com/secure-file-sharing-the-better-way/
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