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Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt
2,524 followers -
Research scientist working on ecological, forestry and biocultural diversity issues in rural and forest landscapes
Research scientist working on ecological, forestry and biocultural diversity issues in rural and forest landscapes

2,524 followers
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4 JOBs - The united Nations University institute for advance studies +UNU-IAS (Tokyo, Japan) is recruiting 4 motivated people to work on the International Satoyama Initiative (ISI) - full time, 1 to 6 years, starting date 04/2017, negotiable, competitive salary:
- 1 Programme associate (https://unu.edu/about/hr/administrative/programme-associate-2.html#overview).
- 1 Senior Programme associate (https://unu.edu/about/hr/administrative/sr-programme-associate.html#overview)
- 1 Academic programme officer (https://unu.edu/about/hr/academic/academic-programme-officer.html#overview)
- 1 administrative assistant (https://unu.edu/about/hr/administrative/administrative-assistant-12.html#overview)

The Satoyama Initiative is a global effort to realise societies in harmony with nature, through promoting the maintenance and rebuilding of socio-ecological production landscapes and seascapes (SEPLS) for the benefit of biodiversity and human well-being. Several members have in the past posted in the community on the satoyama initiative (use the search community box to access the previous posts and have a better idea of the biocultural context). 

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I'm not really into stats and numbers but I was surprised about the recent brutal growth of our community. I just discovered last weekend that http://circlecount.com was tracking the growth rate of all the communities on Google+ since day 1. The number of new members is updated daily and reported on a table. Nothing really sophisticated but enough to realize that our community is now growing exponentially (50-150 members a day, av=70/day) since few months and is doing awesomely well compared to other similar communities I could find: Ecology (9250, av=20/day), Conservation (8700, av=2/day) Anthropology (2400, av=2/day) or Climate change (26500, av=15/day). Even if it is a specialized environmental community, it has the fastest growth rate of all the one I checked . As a comparison the oldest and largest ecological community is "Biodiversity professionals" on Linkedin with 30000 members but with flat growth rate since 2 years. Other more generalist environmental communities are geoscience on Google+ (55000, av=200/day), environmental impact assessment on Linkedin (80,000, av=flat), and of course the titan Science on Google+ ( >650000, >1000/day). Simple conservative calculation suggest that our community will become the largest ecological and socio-cultural science community on the web by the end of this year, even larger than the main national and international webmail lists on these same topics (e.g., INTECOL, ECOLOG-L, EANTH-L, Jeconet). Well I guess the topic of biocultural diversity starts to be popular on social media, which is not a bad thing I guess. I will show in another post how this compares to web search or google scholar history.

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Story teller, poet, drawer and comic-book artist Jiro Taniguchi just passed away today (1947 – 2017 Feb 11th). I'm not used to publicly express private feelings in public, but his death means that something that I deeply valued, and that only Taniguchi could express so well, will no longer be expressed. Like many Frenchmen of my generation, I grew up with Taniguchi's stories (for me late 90's during my first year of uni). Every year since then I was waiting for the next story to read. That was my present for Christmas. Every year. To me, Taniguchi's depth and unique poetic depiction of a large diversity of social and human-nature relationships will be remembered as a unique combination of artists like Jack London, Miyazawa Kenji, Jean-Henri Fabre, Jules Verne and Kawabata Yasunari, Yasujirō Ozu (all my favorite authors, with of course the fabulous and crazy correspondences of Erik Satie). Taniguchi is at that level. Simply put it that way, if there is one comic-book artist on Earth who could have pretended to be nominated for the Nobel price of Literature or equivalent, it would have been him, Jiro Taniguchi. so ありがとうお別れ.
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2/12/17
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Do you know a program that supports sustainable agricultural practices? Solution Search: Farming for Biodiversity is seeking innovative solutions that conserve biodiversity on agricultural lands. Submit your entries by March 10 to win up to $30,000 in prize money and in additional programmatic support. Entries submitted by February 10th will be eligible to win an additional $5,000 towards your solution. www.solutionsearch.org


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Do you know a program that supports sustainable agricultural practices? Solution Search: Farming for Biodiversity is seeking innovative solutions that conserve biodiversity on agricultural lands. Submit your entries by March 10 to win up to $30,000 in prize money and in additional programmatic support. Entries submitted by February 10th will be eligible to win an additional $5,000 towards your solution. www.solutionsearch.org


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Deadline January 23rd: send abstracts for future Volume 6, Issue 1 of Summer 2017 of the Langscape Magazine edited by NGO +Terra Lingua led by +Luisa Maffi . Topic: "Through a Different Lens: The Art and Science of Biocultural Diversity". Contributions may take different forms, either text or artwork-driven—or, in this particular case, both:
- Thought pieces for our "Ideas" section
- Personal accounts, dialogues, stories, or poetry for "Reflections"
- Reports from the field for "Dispatches"
- Discussions of policy interventions or practical solutions for "Action"
- Photo essays, video essays, or other visual art for "Louder Than Words"
- Or surprise langscape with something different, and they will have to create a new section for you!

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Inhabiting Planet Earth: Milan (with English, Spanish, Italian or German subs). Fantastic documentary from the French-German tv channel +ARTE on novel nature-culture pathways in the city of Milan. You will discover how in one of the quarter of the city, the ongoing tensions between two local communities (with their own distinct set of knowledge, beliefs and practices) may likely lead to one of the most interesting and richerst process of biocultural diversification in Europe. Enjoy these 26mn. Guaranty not a waste of your time.

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Australian savanna landscapes are full of fire prone species. This diversity is called pyrodiversity. Many of those species became dominant in Australian landscapes after Aboriginal communities started to manage fire ~50,000 years ago in a highly context specific manner to ensure their own livelihoods. Most aboriginal people, including their unique fire culture were disseminated with colonisation. This loss of traditional fire knowledge became evident when pyrodiversity became vulnerable to large unpredictable fires that were not adapted to their life history traits. Without proper context specific fire knowledge, some ecologists and conservation agencies started the huge task to infer this context specific fire knowledge in various areas from the life-history traits and population/community dynamics of targeted fire prone plant species. Following this logic, a conservation biologist from the University of Melbourne and working with a Western Australian conservation agency and researchers needed my skills in matrix population modelling to estimate the vital rates, life-cycle and demography of seven fire-prone shrub/tree species (Banksia) from South West Australia (around Perth) and assess whether conservation agencies need to use an optimal fire frequency or a diversity of fire regimes to maximize the pyrodiversity of banksia species. This paper represents a synthesis of this work. You can download the pdf of this paper here: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jean-Baptiste_Pichancourt/publication/301907078_Fire_management_strategies_to_maintain_species_population_processes_in_a_fragmented_landscape_of_fire-interval_extremes/links/57302ad908ae3736095c23fd.pdf 

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In 2014, when I was still part of the CSIRO Conservation Decision Team, I have been involved as one of the organiser in the organisation of an elicitation workshop with experts involved in the management of invasive species in the large Lake Eyre Basin (Australia). The outcome was to make rough cost-effective estimates of the planning for controlling a large number of invasive species, such that the management group could communicate with politics about their needs. This paper published in 2015 in +Global Change Biology represents the elicitation process and outcomes of this workshop.
You can download for free the pdf of this paper here: http://eprints.qut.edu.au/86683/3/Firn_et_al-2015-Global_Change_Biology%20(3).pdf

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Such a non trivial and unexpected finding! A study showing that cultural elements of the landscape like roads can have positive impacts on certain long-live native species with important ecosystem functions. I'm now wondering whether we need to reassess the impact of the diversity and connectivity of roads on native biodiversity? Is it good? Is it bad? a bit of both? ... A bit of both I guess! Let see ...
Summary paper - Road networks are proliferating throughout biodiversity-rich regions. Developing conservation and management guidelines for species whose abundance is altered by roads requires understanding the demographic mechanisms that underpin these changes. The authors of this study published in JoAE demonstrate that roads increase the population growth rate of roadside populations of the Brazilian native ant species Atta laevigata, ecosystem engineers and dominant herbivores in Neotropical ecosystems of the Cerrado savannahs and also amongst the longest lived insects in nature. This increase in population growth was due to increased early-life performance. Using this case study, the authors suggest that the expansion of road networks could have major ecological and economic consequences by facilitating the increased abundance of ecosystem engineers and agricultural pests. Accounting for A. laevigata early life stages and careful planning of road placement should improve management strategies of protected areas and agricultural systems in Neotropical savannahs.
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