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cuneyd Uneri
Attended hacettepe tip fakultesi
Lives in raleigh, istanbul
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Two Headed Snake

I remember seeing a GIF of this a while ago. Pretty cool :)
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Is seeing Believing? : The McGurk effect is a compelling demonstration of how we all use visual speech information. The effect shows that we can't help but integrate visual speech into what we 'hear'
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+cuneyd Uneri It also demonstrates exactly how prejudice and bias towards other people works. People don't hear the words, they hear what their preconceived stereotypes tell them is being communicated.
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Ok!
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I shot this pic. at dawn
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Anyone who tries to write a scientific paper must read!
A seasoned editor gives advice to get your work published in an international journal
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Researchers at UC Berkley and UCSF have found that a pill used to treat Parkinson's disease makes people more empathetic.
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presentation, being conditioned , management of perception .......
we are all biased 
 
"A man sat at a metro station in Washington DC and started to play the violin; it was a cold January morning. He played six Bach pieces for about 45 minutes. During that time, since it was rush hour, it was calculated that 1,100 people went through the station, most of them on their way to work.

Three minutes went by, and a middle aged man noticed there was musician playing. He slowed his pace, and stopped for a few seconds, and then hurried up to meet his schedule.

A minute later, the violinist received his first dollar tip: a woman threw the money in the till and without stopping, and continued to walk.

A few minutes later, someone leaned against the wall to listen to him, but the man looked at his watch and started to walk again. Clearly he was late for work.

The one who paid the most attention was a 3 year old boy. His mother tagged him along, hurried, but the kid stopped to look at the violinist. Finally, the mother pushed hard, and the child continued to walk, turning his head all the time. This action was repeated by several other children. All the parents, without exception, forced them to move on.

In the 45 minutes the musician played, only 6 people stopped and stayed for a while. About 20 gave him money, but continued to walk their normal pace. He collected $32. When he finished playing and silence took over, no one noticed it. No one applauded, nor was there any recognition.

No one knew this, but the violinist was Joshua Bell, one of the most talented musicians in the world. He had just played one of the most intricate pieces ever written, on a violin worth $3.5 million dollars.

Two days before his playing in the subway, Joshua Bell sold out at a theater in Boston where the seats averaged $100.

This is a real story. Joshua Bell playing incognito in the metro station was organized by the Washington Post as part of a social experiment about perception, taste, and priorities of people. The outlines were: in a commonplace environment at an inappropriate hour: Do we perceive beauty? Do we stop to appreciate it? Do we recognize the talent in an unexpected context?

One of the possible conclusions from this experience could be:

If we do not have a moment to stop and listen to one of the best musicians in the world playing the best music ever written, how many other things are we missing?"

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Logical Fallacies (Part 4)

Welcome back to my logical fallacy guide. If you haven't read the previous parts of the guide, you can read them here:

Part One: http://goo.gl/auAeT5
Part Two: http://goo.gl/0gSwRd
Part Three: http://goo.gl/orU4aC

This part of the guide will be slightly different. Instead of writing about more fallacies, I'd like to share some resources instead.

Resources

https://yourlogicalfallacyis.com/ - This is a very basic list of fallacies, and the website isn't great to navigate. However, the explanations are good, and they include examples.

http://www.logicallyfallacious.com/index.php/logical-fallacies - This is a much more comprehensive list of fallacies, and it's much easier to navigate. The explanations are good, and so are the examples.

http://www.logicallyfallacious.com/index.php/b-list-fallacies - This is from the same author as the previous link. This is his B-list of fallacies, and it's arranged as a list. The descriptions are very brief, as are the examples, but it does give you the gist. Some of the fallacies on the list, like The Burden of Proof Fallacy, deserve a bigger entry in my opinion. But it's a minor detail.

http://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Main_Page - This wiki covers logical fallacies as well, and their examples and explanations are excellent. It goes much further than that, though. It delves into lots of things relating to pseudo-science and religion, and it really gives you a feel for critical thinking.

http://www.snopes.com/info/whatsnew.asp - This link doesn't go into logical fallacies, but it does test myths and urban legends. It's a massive resource and it can be really useful when you're trying to work out if something is valid.

Well that's it folks. I hope you've enjoyed this series. Have you spotted any of these fallacies in the wild? Feel free to share them in the comments. Thanks for reading.
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